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560Ti a bottleneck to 2600K?

Is this card GTX 560Ti will be bottlenecking a 2600K?
If yes, at what CPU is the threshold that 560 will not bottleneck CPU (on par performance)? a 2500K?
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More about 560ti bottleneck 2600k
  1. You would be ok with that CPU and GPU combo.
  2. I know, but 2600K is capable of working out a 580 (to full maybe?). This is my concern: would it bottleneck the 2600k?
    Because I'd like to buy a VGA now, later CPU. And I plan to buy 2600K or 2500K more futureproof performance (?), so I'd choose either 560 or 570. I'm using Q6600 now but will upgrade soon.
  3. Dont feel bad. I believe you made the right choice either way.
    560 ti the new GPU card from Nvdia , You will need at least 500Watt for this GPU

    but more better upgrade . sandy & wait New mobo P68 (New)..
  4. henydiah said:
    Dont feel bad. I believe you made the right choice either way.
    560 ti the new GPU card from Nvdia , You will need at least 500Watt for this GPU

    but more better upgrade . sandy & wait New mobo P68 (New)..

    lol, henydiah, whats up? P68? Is that the next chipset?

    Quote:
    GPU's don't bottleneck CPU's.

    Thanks Psycho I need that.
  5. Best answer
    andrern2000 said:
    Is this card GTX 560Ti will be bottlenecking a 2600K?
    If yes, at what CPU is the threshold that 560 will not bottleneck CPU (on par performance)? a 2500K?
    The real question is which will top out first in games, and the real answer is that at 1680x1050 you'll run out of CPU in most games, while at 2560x1600 you'll run out of GPU. It gets more complicated than that though.

    The reason you see a "CPU Bottleneck" in games at low resolutions is because your GPU isn't getting data fast enough to run at its full potential. But you usually don't need a GPU to reach its full potential at lower resolutions, because your frame rate is already high. In other words, dropping from 120 FPS to 100 FPS isn't going to be noticeable in most circumstances.

    When you move up to higher resolutions, you're basically sending the data to the GPU faster than the GPU can make the calculations. The only time you need a "better" video card is when the GPU can't calculate that data fast enough to meet your exceptionally-high requirements (such as 2560 with 8x AA and full details).

    When you balance out those two factors, you'll find that the 2600K is fast enough for "nearly everyone" while the 560ti is fast enough for "most" games at 1920x1080 and high settings.
  6. New mobo P68 (New) yeach come with Ivy bridge.. sorry..!
  7. Crashman said:
    The real question is which will top out first in games, and the real answer is that at 1680x1050 you'll run out of CPU in most games, while at 2560x1600 you'll run out of GPU. It gets more complicated than that though.

    The reason you see a "CPU Bottleneck" in games at low resolutions is because your GPU isn't getting data fast enough to run at its full potential. But you usually don't need a GPU to reach its full potential at lower resolutions, because your frame rate is already high. In other words, dropping from 120 FPS to 100 FPS isn't going to be noticeable in most circumstances.

    When you move up to higher resolutions, you're basically sending the data to the GPU faster than the GPU can make the calculations. The only time you need a "better" video card is when the GPU can't calculate that data fast enough to meet your exceptionally-high requirements (such as 2560 with 8x AA and full details).

    When you balance out those two factors, you'll find that the 2600K is fast enough for "nearly everyone" while the 560ti is fast enough for "most" games at 1920x1080 and high settings.


    Thanks, Crash. You may need to save this answer somewhere in Notepad in case someone else asks again (you won't like to retype it again and again :P ). This is really indeed valuable information.
    I appreciate that.
  8. Best answer selected by andrern2000.
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