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Choosing the right cpu fan/heatsink how?

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February 14, 2011 4:32:44 PM

Hello

How do you choose the right cpu fan/heatsink? I checked on New Egg and there are so many choices.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
February 14, 2011 7:20:43 PM

Look through the threads under "overclocking, coolers and heat sinks. Generally, the biggest concern is whether or not ones' case is large enough for the choice of cooler.
Maybe a moderator can move this over to that section for you.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
February 14, 2011 7:30:16 PM

This topic has been moved from the section CPU & Components to section Overclocking by Mousemonkey
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a b K Overclocking
February 14, 2011 8:12:42 PM

g335 said:
Hello

How do you choose the right cpu fan/heatsink? I checked on New Egg and there are so many choices.


1st check to see if the heatsink can fit in the case. Then you might wanna consider on what kind of ram heatsinks you are using because sometimes if your memory is to tall it'll hit the fan on the heatsink. How much are you willing to spend and are you using a micro atx or normal atx motherboard? Me im choosing the Prolimatech Armageddon because it can support 2 140mm fans and it doesn't hit the ram either. But the Prolimatech Armageddon might have a hard time installing on a micro atx motherboard. Also check Mwave.com, Frozencpu.com and Crazypc.com they have some good ones that newegg doesn't carry.

Here's a pretty good video of heatsinks comparisons. All of them are using the same fans in push pull configuration and the room temp is 70F. The cpu they are using is the i7 950 at stock speed and overclock at 4ghz.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QP1mLbWlY70

They have Cooler Master V6, Thermaltake Frio, Prolimatech Megahalems, Spire 2, Raid Max x3, Cooler Master V8 and Corsair h70 in testing comparison.

February 16, 2011 10:59:05 PM

Bigmac80 said:
1st check to see if the heatsink can fit in the case. Then you might wanna consider on what kind of ram heatsinks you are using because sometimes if your memory is to tall it'll hit the fan on the heatsink. How much are you willing to spend and are you using a micro atx or normal atx motherboard? Me im choosing the Prolimatech Armageddon because it can support 2 140mm fans and it doesn't hit the ram either. But the Prolimatech Armageddon might have a hard time installing on a micro atx motherboard. Also check Mwave.com, Frozencpu.com and Crazypc.com they have some good ones that newegg doesn't carry.

Here's a pretty good video of heatsinks comparisons. All of them are using the same fans in push pull configuration and the room temp is 70F. The cpu they are using is the i7 950 at stock speed and overclock at 4ghz.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QP1mLbWlY70

They have Cooler Master V6, Thermaltake Frio, Prolimatech Megahalems, Spire 2, Raid Max x3, Cooler Master V8 and Corsair h70 in testing comparison.


I will look at them.
a b à CPUs
a c 106 K Overclocking
October 25, 2013 4:27:06 PM

g335 said:
Hello

How do you choose the right cpu fan/heatsink? I checked on New Egg and there are so many choices.


When I was shopping for a HSF, I looked to the reviews on Tom's Hardware and AnandTech:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/LGA-2011-i7-3960X-A...
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-heat-sink-hasw...
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nepton-280l-tundra-...
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6830/cpu-air-cooler-round...

Based upon the above info, I chose the Noctua NH D14 SE 2011.

Yogi

a c 120 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
October 25, 2013 6:18:01 PM

I'm pretty much just going to regurgitate what everyone else has said.

First, check your form-factor. How large of an aftermarket cooling solution does your case allow? Secondly, what kind of RAM do you have, how tall is it, and how many sticks do you have?

Once you figure that out, you can look and see if you can find any coolers that fit the bill - literally and figuratively. Seriously, how much do you want to spend?

If you see some that fit the bill, start looking at reviews, and always cross-reference. There are some sites that end up getting great results for one product, for whatever reason, while some others may only get an average result. There are a growing number of Youtube reviews, and that can be nice, because most companies lie about their decibel ratings. Getting an idea of how they will actually sound is great.

Review sites that actually go into some detail about mounting methods and package bundles are where you will learn the most. A lot of people focus on just absolute performance of cooling solutions, and overlook how nice it is to have an ergonomic, stable mounting method that you won't dread to have to install again.

We could give you a run-down of some general doctrines and mindsets behind certain companies, but, learning about those is half the fun. :) 
!