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What not to store on an SSD???

Last response: in Storage
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December 17, 2010 5:58:18 AM

Hello everyone,

Someone told me today that one thing you should NOT store on an SSD is your operating system. His reasoning was that if someone were to get a virus off the internet it could crash the SSD, and he further said; "What would you rather lose, an SSD or a cheaper HDD?"

I have no idea whether he is being honest or just full of it.

But that did raise a concern, what should you not store on an SSD?

Thanks to all comments.

More about : store ssd

a b G Storage
December 17, 2010 6:41:24 AM

On the contrary, the SSD is meant for storing OS. It would give you faster boot time and access speed. Just dont store music, movies and other less used apps. SSD's are small and they should be made full use of by storing OS, games that you are currently playing.
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a b G Storage
December 17, 2010 7:21:51 AM

^+1.. Except static data such as movies, music and less frequently used apps, you can store everything else on your SSD..
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December 17, 2010 9:48:36 AM

What level of PC or IT experience does this person have?

Even if you got a virus it would not destroy the SSD or an HDD.
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December 17, 2010 10:56:58 AM

Actually SSD is great for static files you just read once in time, but they are not best for files that are often modified if you want make sure SSD last for long time.
Thats for example Paging space, Temp and program cache directories should be stored on regular hdd and just binaries on SDD.
Ofcourse if you dont care about lifespan and just want performance SDD is great for caching as it can be much faster in transfers and get much higher IOS. But keep in mind that SDD cells have limited number of cycles they can be written on.
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December 17, 2010 10:58:59 AM

mark_k said:
What level of PC or IT experience does this person have?

Even if you got a virus it would not destroy the SSD or an HDD.


Want to bet ? How about overwriting part of firmware with nonsense data ?
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a c 127 G Storage
December 17, 2010 12:50:41 PM

Windows OS will 'lock' the security features of your HDD/SSD, to prevent a virus from hijacking the drive, so called 'ransomware' because it wants money in exchange for the cryptographic key which can unlock your storage device and thus files.

I don't see a way for software to 'brick' a drive; that should not be possible. I believe firmware without valid checksum is or should also be refused, though this obviously can be a weak point. I'm not sure if upgrading firmware is possible in protected mode; you may need to use DOS to circumvent the security locks on the SSD/HDD.
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a b G Storage
December 18, 2010 5:26:52 AM

FSUMack86 said:
Someone told me today that one thing you should NOT store on an SSD is your operating system.

For consumer usage this is the one thing that you want on your SSD. Unless you're running with under 1GB of RAM there is no single upgrade that will provide a greater performance boost for general system responsiveness.

xrodney said:
Actually SSD is great for static files you just read once in time, but they are not best for files that are often modified if you want make sure SSD last for long time.


That's no different to a HDD. More use will wear out both, except that SSDs only wear out from writes while HDDs wear out from both reads and writes. When your HDD wears out it's entirely useless without proper data recovery, while the SSD is still readable. Storing static data on it is a massive (expensive) waste of a good SSD.

xrodney said:
Want to bet ? How about overwriting part of firmware with nonsense data ?


We all know how often that happens. I'd be more worried about a dead 2TB HDD filled up with important data than a bricked SSD with little more than an OS and applications.
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December 18, 2010 11:00:07 AM

Again I ask:
What level of PC or IT experience does this person have?

lol.....
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a b G Storage
December 18, 2010 5:40:56 PM

Technically an SSD is meant as a drop in replacement. You can easily put your everything you have onto the SSD, its designed to be a drop in replacement so your OS, APPs AND DATA can easily go onto the SSD. People who have laptops for example, have no choice but use the SSD. THe only reason many tech savy desktop PC users store data on a seperate HDD is because SSD's are very expensive per dollar and reducing read/writes on the SSD will increase its lifespan. However whatever you do, your SSD will outlast an HDD anyway so it really doesn't matter.
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a c 415 G Storage
December 18, 2010 6:40:46 PM

Frankly, if you're all that concerned about software that maliciously overwrites the firmware in your SSD then it really doesn't matter if holds the OS or not. Malware can overwrite the firmware in a data drive just as easily as it can for the OS drive.

So if you decide you want the very considerable performance advantage of an SSD, then you really should use it as the OS drive - for most people it'll do far more for performance there than it would as a data drive.
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a b G Storage
December 20, 2010 6:49:07 AM

randomizer said:
We all know how often that happens. I'd be more worried about a dead 2TB HDD filled up with important data than a bricked SSD with little more than an OS and applications.


Absolutely and postivily 100% agree with this part! :) 
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December 20, 2010 12:51:48 PM

How long before we see 1TB drives with say 128gig SSD's built in ???
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a b G Storage
December 20, 2010 1:07:00 PM

No idea about that! Better ask GSkill/OCZ/Intel about it.
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December 21, 2010 7:17:40 AM

Best answer selected by fsumack86.
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December 21, 2010 12:00:11 PM

hell_storm2004 said:
No idea about that! Better ask GSkill/OCZ/Intel about it.


lol
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