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GA-P35-DS3R: No Post after failed Win7 resume

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October 24, 2009 2:15:48 AM

So, received my Win7 upgrade yesterday and installed last night which went fine. Didn't think about turning suspend/hibernation off. (I leave system on all the time, XP set to not hibernate or suspend) Came home tonight and found that it had hibernated. Hit power button, no visible activity, no video. Hit enter key a few times and finally got a resuming windows screen and then very garbled messed up graphics. Didn't seem to be able to complete, so held the power button down to power off. Now, system won't post. Fans spin but nothing else at all happens. Tried removing memory, no beep codes. Disconnected hard drives. No change. Fans spin, no display, nothing else. I popped the CMOS battery with power disconnected and still nothing.

Have I killed the board somehow or what else can I try? I don't currently have a spare PSU, CPU, or video card. No idea what my BIOS version was but can't look at it since no post.

GA-P35-DS3R (Rev. 1.0 is stamped on the board? It was purchased in Sept. 2007)
Corsair 520 PSU
Intel E6750 Core 2 Duo
Corsair Ballistix RAM; 2x1g
eVGA 8800GT
2xWestern Digital hard drives
USB keyboard
USB mouse
a c 177 V Motherboard
October 24, 2009 3:59:43 PM

Mind you, there are two ways to do this: you can do it either in or out of the case. The advantages and drawbacks:in the case is easier and faster, but will not find case-related problems, like shorts from extra, mispositioned standoffs, or ground plane problems; out of the case takes longer, and you may run into 'reach' problems - power supply cables and front panel power switch headers may not be long enough; for the power supply, it's usually just a matter of removing four screws to temorarily relocate it; for the power switch, you can just do this (carefully):

You only need to short the pins momentarily - that's all the power switch does...Out of the case also affords you an easy opportunity to 'flip' the board to check your heatsink/fan attachment setup, to be sure all the pins are fully seated, locked, and not cracked... If you do the out of the case, you need to lay the board on a non-conductive surface: the box the MOBO came in is ideal; but - the foam pad it came with, and the bag it was in are not - being 'antistat', they are somewhat conductive, and may induce problems...

Another item worth mention at this point is case speakers: if you haven't got one - get one!
http://www.cwc-group.com/casp.html
A lot of people operate under the misaprehension that the 'diagnostic beeps' should come through the speakers attached to their sound-card/chip - not so! Your three hundred dollar Altec-Lansings won't do you any good here - you have to have a case speaker attached to the front panel header, and, often by this point, it's the only diagnostic info you'll have to go on...

The standard 'strip-down':

Power down at PSU switch
remove everything except
CPU and heatsink/fan (check carefully that the fan retaining pins are fully inserted, completely locked, and not cracked)
one stick of RAM, in slot closest to CPU
video card and monitor connector (if more than one PCIe slot, again, in slot closest to CPU)
all power plugs - 20+4 or 24, 2x2 or 2x4 ATX power, graphics card power
case speaker and power switch connectors
keyboard (don't need a mouse at this point)
place jumper on RST_CMOS pins
remove jumper from RST_CMOS pins
power up at PSU switch
power up by depressing case power switch (or shorting the 'power' pins...)
If you get video, enter BIOS with <DEL> (may need a <TAB> to get to POST screen, if 'splash' screen is enabled)
Select and execute "Load Optimized Defaults" - save and exit, reboot
power down
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October 24, 2009 9:38:52 PM

Thanks for the detailed answer. Unfortunately right now, everything is out of the case (used screwdriver to short the power on) and still get no video. Only caveat is that I do not have a speaker to connect to it so the beep codes are a problem, if it is giving any. No video to screen. Tried with orig. and alternate power supplies...both have same behavior. Tried orig. (PCIe) and alternate (PCI) video card. No change. 1 stick RAM in slot closest to CPU. Board is on top of it's box. No visible cracks or problems with standoffs etc. HSF is securely connected.

At this point, I have to believe the problem is hardware...and I'm leaning towards the board over the CPU. But there's not too much more I can do to troubleshoot it.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
October 24, 2009 10:19:21 PM

If you are in a metropolitan area, you might want to see if a local shop can sell/give you a case speaker - they're dirt cheap, and, as I said above, often by this point, it's the only diagnostic info you can get!
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October 25, 2009 1:34:35 PM

I had the same problem with the p35 ds3l, when i started dual booting it wouldnt post, or would stay at the gigabyte splash screen,i took out all the memory,cleared the cmos, and when it stared loaded factory safe defaults, everything was working fine after that, until i left my external hd when i had to reboot, wouldnt post and had to do the same thing over. And whatever you do dont forget to grap the windows 7 drivers from gigabyte, will make your life a lot easier, This board was awesome until i went 64 bit, dont know whats going o with it.
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October 27, 2009 1:07:58 PM

OK, bought a little $3 speaker at radio shack and have the + and - wires touching the appropriate pins on the board. With NO video card, I got 3 beeps followed by a continuous cycle of 8 beeps. According to the manual, continuous long beeps is vid card not properly inserted. So I inserted the old PCI vid card I had borrowed...same beeps. So, put my PCIe vid card back in (and had to switch back to my original PSU for the PCIe power) and get no beeps at all and still no video. I guess I can go try to find/borrow a PCIe vid card to try.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
October 27, 2009 2:40:50 PM

reconviperone1 -
Quote:
I had the same problem with the p35 ds3l, when i started dual booting it wouldnt post, or would stay at the gigabyte splash screen,i took out all the memory,cleared the cmos, and when it stared loaded factory safe defaults, everything was working fine after that, until i left my external hd when i had to reboot, wouldnt post and had to do the same thing over. And whatever you do dont forget to grap the windows 7 drivers from gigabyte, will make your life a lot easier, This board was awesome until i went 64 bit, dont know whats going o with it.

That is your external HD; I'm betting two things - it's connected via USB, and it's a WD... See:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261902-30-gigabyte-ta...
and:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/260350-30-gigabyte-ep...

As for the beep codes (I hate undocumented BIOS crap - and I'd kill to get my hands on a 'disassembled' BIOS, or, even better - source code!!) this seems to be the only relevant thing I could find:
http://www.howtofixcomputers.com/forums/gigabyte/gigaby...
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October 27, 2009 9:12:03 PM

alright, apparently the speaker wires lost connection. With the vid card inserted, I continue to get 3 beeps then a short pause and then continuous beeps. Seems to indicate graphics card not properly inserted (it is) so it's either the card or the board. I may swing by the CompUSA outlet in town to pick up a 4650 or 4670 to test with. I should have an alternate board tomorrow or Thursday also.
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October 29, 2009 1:02:51 AM

Am I down to calling it the CPU?

Received another board to use today and borrowed an alternate PCIe video card (an ATI HD 2400 I think; no power connection required). Getting the same behavior...ie. fans come on and stay on but no video. However, holding the speaker wires to the pins on this board isn't giving me any sound like it did on my board. Not sure what is up with that.

So I've tried 2 of each of the following:
motherboard
PSU
Video Card

Tried with and without memory and memory in alternate slots
Only other thing connected is a USB keyboard

re: lcd/cables, when switching between cards, it does recognize the connection...ie. it displays "digital" power saving mode vs. "analog" power saving mode.

Only thing I haven't swapped is the CPU.

CPU is correctly seated and HSF is on securely. Apparently not overheating because system is not powering off.
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October 30, 2009 1:36:15 AM

bleeping piece of *@&*. Yeah, turns out it was memory. When the system failed, I had 2 sticks of memory in it...both 1gb DDR2 Crucial Ballistix. I was only running XP so didn't bother adding more than the 2gb. It really didn't occur to me that both sticks could be bad, so during all this troubleshooting I was alternating with these 2 sticks; one in or the other. I got some other sticks and system posted fine. Ugh. How common is it for 2 sticks to fail at the same time?!
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a c 177 V Motherboard
October 30, 2009 3:08:09 PM

Assuming you did do the "Load Optimized", could it be a bad SPD that set the memory up incorrectly? BIOS fault? Always possible (but, as you say, highly unlikely, as both controller channels would have to be bad [maybe a defunct northbridge?]), that you've got bad slots - thinking about it, it might be only one - you switched the memory around, so if one slot is bad, it might have 'toasted' both DIMMs...
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November 10, 2009 2:16:06 PM

I'm currently wondering what technology deity I have apparently angered.

So I've been slow to get everything back up and running...during the previous troubleshooting I ended up with an extra board and an extra processor. Once the problem appeared to be memory, I decided to take the extra parts and buy a case and PSU and set up a Windows Home Server. So last night I got my original board, the aforementioned Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3R, set up in the new case running WHS. Once I had that done, I shut it down, disconnected the WHS hard drive, and re-connected my original 160gb hard drive (XP and Win 7 in a dual boot). Since the 160gb was originally connected to the Gigabyte board, I figured it should boot without too many complaints. Apparently I was wrong. Now, when all the problems went down, the system was booted to Win 7 and apparently hibernated and did not completely/succesfully recover. And, fwiw, the BIOS at the time was version F6a. (It is now flashed to F13).

Anyway, I connected the drive and attempted to boot. Now maybe I should have tried booting to Win 7 first since that was the last attempt, but instead I selected my XP install ("earlier version of windows"). Reason being, I wanted to get it booted and manually copy some files off. (I do have an Acronis True Image backup taken the night before installing Win 7.) Well, first XP gave the notice that a consistency check was required but I pressed "any" key to skip. So then it tried to get to the desktop. After quite a few...ok, a lot...of "Delayed Write Failure" messages I finally got to the desktop. Once there, I was able to move around OK, open event viewer, etc. Since I had received a message that my new hardware would be ready after a restart, I decided to go ahead and do that. Mistake. Now trying to boot XP I got a nasty BSOD...Unmountable Boot Volume.

So, I figured I'd try to boot Win 7. Got the checkdisk message again so let it check. When it finished it restarted. I gave it a good 10 minutes or so but it was never able to get to the desktop...just stayed on the screen with the colored moving bar.

As it was after 11 at that point, I just powered everything off for the night and gave up.


So, I'm now wondering 1 - if/how the dead memory and problem hard drive are related; and 2 - what killed them. Did the memory die just because it died or because of the hibernate issue or something else, like motherboard or power supply? Is my hard drive corrupt due to the hibernate issue or due to something else?

And I'm also trying to figure out what approach I want to take... 1 - Boot my XP CD to access Recovery Console and try to checkdisk /r my XP install? 2 - Boot to CD and restore my Acronis True Image backup to the original drive? 3 - Just get a new hard drive, load Win 7, then attach the original drive and try to pull files?

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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 10, 2009 4:18:40 PM

Quote:
So, I'm now wondering 1 - if/how the dead memory and problem hard drive are related; and 2 - what killed them. Did the memory die just because it died or because of the hibernate issue or something else, like motherboard or power supply? Is my hard drive corrupt due to the hibernate issue or due to something else?

Anything is possible! Corrupt memory can obviously lead to corrupt information on a HDD - the info is block transferred from memory to the disk controller, so garbage in, garbage out... Also, any 'death' during a write can happen - entering a somehow 'bad' S-state, BSOD, whatever - if the drive is 'caught' before it can flush its cache, you have a mess!
Quote:
And I'm also trying to figure out what approach I want to take... 1 - Boot my XP CD to access Recovery Console and try to checkdisk /r my XP install? 2 - Boot to CD and restore my Acronis True Image backup to the original drive? 3 - Just get a new hard drive, load Win 7, then attach the original drive and try to pull files?

I'd go with three; get another drive, make it your boot drive; recover your files to a safe location; reformat your original drive and make it your data drive - and never the twain shall meet! If you keep your data separate, physically, your whole life gets simpler by an order of magnitude; backups are easier, system drive maintenance is easier, and you won't be daunted by the occasionally necessary OS reinstall. Another point to make is that, if you want to 'multi-boot', especially to MS' OSs, use a good boot manager (and the best, hands down, is TeraByte Unlimited's BootIt Next Generation: http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-next-generation... - mind-bogglingly great program, staggering support; I could rave for three paragraphs!); sure, MS includes the ability to install multiple boot items, but it's ragged to say the least - allows interactions between OSs, sometimes breaks for no apparent reason... With BootIt, you create separate boot partitions for various OSs, and thereafter, they are completely hidden from each other; at boot, the manager rewrites the MBR (master boot record) on the drive itself - interaction problems gone!
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