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1.65 RAM 1.5V MOBO

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October 25, 2009 1:04:10 PM

OCZ PC3-10666 Platinum RAM - 4GB, 2x2GB, 1333MHz, DDR3, Low Voltage, Dual Channel

on

Intel DP55WB Motherboard - Intel P55, Socket LGA1156, micro ATX, 8 Channel Audio

MEMORY IS RATED AT 1.65V

MOBO at 1.5V

am i going to run into issues?

More about : ram mobo

a b } Memory
a b å Intel
October 25, 2009 2:39:58 PM

1.5v-1.65v is acceptable range for a 1156/1366 mobo.
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November 5, 2009 2:25:42 AM

WR2 said:
1.5v-1.65v is acceptable range for a 1156/1366 mobo.

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November 5, 2009 2:38:49 AM

WR2 said:
1.5v-1.65v is acceptable range for a 1156/1366 mobo.


Are you sure? The manual says that 1.65v could damage a i5 or i7 800 series. How could it damage it?
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November 9, 2009 12:03:40 AM

i too would like to know if i will run into issues...OCZ 4GB DDR3 PC3-10666 Platinum Low Voltage Memory running on a Intel Desktop Board DP55WB Motherboard... and my question is the same will the 1.5V MOBO run into problems with 1.6V of RAM?
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February 10, 2010 9:28:37 AM

I also have the same question.
I am now very frustrated with the 1.5v safe voltage statement in the Intel documentation for the i7 860, everyone on forums are saying 1.65v is safe!
Where does it say officially that 1.65v is safe because I can`t find anything official.
I want to overclock my i7 860 when I get it and I understand that I will be going over stock voltages.....thats fine.
But I only want to o/c it to 3.6 with turbo off and h/t on which should not cause to much stress on the cpu.
The problem I do have though is the 1.65v memory issue that by all accounts can fry the cpu.
Sorry for going on but I am fed up searching forums where people just say "yeah it`s safe because I have seen somewhere that 1.65v is ok" just because their system has been running for a week with no problems.
Please will someone with hard proof that 1.65v DDR 3 Ram is ok and within Intel limits point me and others like me in the right direction.
I need to sleep at night you know!




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February 12, 2010 1:48:37 PM

I think there's some confusion here: isn't the 1.5V the absolute limit for you CPU voltage, while 1.65V is the advertised maximum on your DRAM voltage?
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February 12, 2010 7:14:56 PM

Falx said:
I think there's some confusion here: isn't the 1.5V the absolute limit for you CPU voltage, while 1.65V is the advertised maximum on your DRAM voltage?


Below is the info from the Intel data sheet:

http://download.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/322...

Page 11, Para 1.2.1

System memory features include:
• Data burst length of eight for all memory organization modes
• 64-bit wide channels
• DDR3 I/O Voltage of 1.5 V:hello: 

• Maximum memory bandwidth of 10.6 GB/s in single-channel mode or 21 GB/s in
dual-channel mode assuming DDR3 1333 MT/s
• 1-Gb and 2-Gb DDR3 DRAM technologies are supported.
• Using 2-Gb device technologies, the largest memory capacity possible is 16 GB for
UDIMMs (assuming Dual Channel Mode with a four double-sided unbuffered DIMM
memory configuration)
• Up to 64 simultaneous open pages, 32 per channel (assuming 8 ranks of 8 bank
devices)
• Command launch modes of 1n/2n
• Intel® Fast Memory Access (Intel® FMA)
— Just-in-Time Command Scheduling
— Command Overlap
— Out-of-Order Scheduling.

So unless Intel have some other data sheets for the i7 860 I think some explaining needs to be done by the memory manufacturers that state 1.65v for their RAM compatibility with the i7 860.
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Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 13, 2010 7:26:01 AM

I've been using Patriot Memory for a few years now, and they are identical to OCZ is a few respects. I've seen cases where the only big difference is OCZ is more "bling" but they use the same memory chips and PCB. And I've always had to crank my voltage to 1.7V to get them stable. Doesn't matter if you run 1 gig sticks or 2 gig sticks. And my system is running 100% stable, 24/7 (my older system, using a Intel DP45SG which is known for being notoriously picky about RAM!). So while I don't have documented evidence I do have hands on experience. Hope that helps!
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a b } Memory
February 15, 2010 5:58:47 PM

Look at the intel spec sheet again. Table 7-6 shows that for "Processor I/O supply voltage for DDR3" the Min is 1.425V, Typ = 1.5, and Max is 1.575. However go back to Table 7-4 and you'll see the "Absolute Max" is 1.65V. (pages 68 and 67, respectively) http://download.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/322...
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February 16, 2010 12:50:54 PM

ekoostik said:
Look at the intel spec sheet again. Table 7-6 shows that for "Processor I/O supply voltage for DDR3" the Min is 1.425V, Typ = 1.5, and Max is 1.575. However go back to Table 7-4 and you'll see the "Absolute Max" is 1.65V. (pages 68 and 67, respectively) http://download.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/322...


Thanks for pointing that out.

I am a crap reader to be honest.

I did notice though the following statement:

Absolute Maximum and Minimum Ratings

Table 7-4 specifies absolute maximum and minimum ratings. At conditions outside
functional operation condition limits, but within absolute maximum and minimum
ratings, neither functionality nor long-term reliability can be expected. If a device is
returned to conditions within functional operation limits after having been subjected to
conditions outside these limits (but within the absolute maximum and minimum
ratings) the device may be functional, but with its lifetime degraded depending on
exposure to conditions exceeding the functional operation condition limits.

To be honest I think Intel are just covering all bases but to me the short of it is, go over 1.575v and who knows what will happen and if the who knows happens your on you own!
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