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High vs Low CPU Multiplier

Last response: in Overclocking
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February 25, 2011 11:53:22 AM

I've been doing some research on overclocking, and have been tweaking my own set up. I noticed that it is commonly accepted that your FSB:D RAM ratio is ideally equal to 1. In order to do this you would need a low CPU multiplier and a high BCLK frequency in order to keep your CPU stable.

Currently I'm running:

i7 920 @ 3800mhz with 12gb ram at 1600mhz

19x multiplier
200 BCLK
FSB:D RAM ratio is 2:8 (200:800)

My main question is whether a high multiplier is better than a low multiplier. Does it matter at all?

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a c 172 à CPUs
a c 197 K Overclocking
February 25, 2011 12:15:36 PM
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No, the whole 1:1 ratio thing is true for Core2 systems.

The i chips have the memory controller built into the CPU chip. The rules are different. Technically, the i chips do not even have a frontside bus.

Your setup is fine.
February 25, 2011 12:31:17 PM

Best answer selected by Floks.
February 25, 2011 2:06:59 PM

Floks said:
I've been doing some research on overclocking, and have been tweaking my own set up. I noticed that it is commonly accepted that your FSB:D RAM ratio is ideally equal to 1. In order to do this you would need a low CPU multiplier and a high BCLK frequency in order to keep your CPU stable.

Currently I'm running:

i7 920 @ 3800mhz with 12gb ram at 1600mhz

19x multiplier
200 BCLK
FSB:D RAM ratio is 2:8 (200:800)

My main question is whether a high multiplier is better than a low multiplier. Does it matter at all?


You should try to run the highest stable BCLK, since that speeds up more than just the processor, and then adjust your multiplier accordingly.
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