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Direct TV modem dead

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Anonymous
April 12, 2005 1:12:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.satellite.tv (More info?)

I have 2 DTV receivers that lost their modems. I haven't gotten into the
chassis, just quit buying movies. I'm guessing lighting zapped them as I had
the same thing happen to a Pc modem till I added a surge suppressor to my
phone line.
Is there a fuse on the receiver pcb, or is that too simple ?

More about : direct modem dead

Anonymous
April 12, 2005 8:38:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.satellite.tv (More info?)

On 12-Apr-2005, "Jeff Dieterle" <jdieter@nospam.carlnet.org> wrote:

> I have 2 DTV receivers that lost their modems. I haven't gotten into the
> chassis, just quit buying movies. I'm guessing lighting zapped them as I
> had
> the same thing happen to a Pc modem till I added a surge suppressor to my
> phone line.

Your homeowners insurance should cover the loss minus any deductible.
Anonymous
April 13, 2005 1:05:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.satellite.tv (More info?)

A few erroneous assumptions were made. For example, how did
a destructive transient enter on phone line when the telco
installs an effective 'whole house' protector, for free, where
their wires meet yours? How does a protector adjacent to the
modem (without an earth ground) do more than the existing and
properly earthed protector?

Second. Which wires highest on a utility pole make a direct
connection to electronics inside that modem?

Third. Why do you assume a protector and protection are
the same thing? Those are two different components of a surge
protection 'system'. You have the surge protector. But a
surge protector not properly connected to surge protection is
simply ineffective.

What is the one component that every protection 'system'
must have? Earthing. Therein lies your first question. What
the transient earthed before it entered the building. They
you may discover phone lines are not the most common source of
modem damage.

Jeff Dieterle wrote:
> I have 2 DTV receivers that lost their modems. I haven't gotten
> into the chassis, just quit buying movies. I'm guessing lighting
> zapped them as I had the same thing happen to a Pc modem till I
> added a surge suppressor to my phone line. Is there a fuse on
> the receiver pcb, or is that too simple ?
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Anonymous
April 13, 2005 1:33:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.satellite.tv (More info?)

L230j@verizon.net ....the deductible on my insurance is more than a
purchasing a new receiver and since I've lost 3 modems ( 1 on a pc, 2 on DTV
receivers)

"w_tom" thanks for the info on transients and earthing - I guess, but I'm
looking for info on the guts of a DTV receiver regarding fuse protection
ahead of the modem
Anonymous
April 14, 2005 12:43:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.satellite.tv (More info?)

Unfortunately, fuses tend to fail after damage has
occurred. The primary purpose of a fuse is to protect you
after internal electronic damage has been created. In fact,
some designs integrate a 'fuse' function as part of other
electronic components. For example, when the schematic calls
for a flame retardant resistor, then never replace that
resistor with a conventional carbon resistor. The resistor is
also acting as a fuse to protect your life. Using a carbon
resistor would only create a fire.

Another device that can blow is the inrush current limiter.
Its function is to provide power quite slowly to the power
supply on powerup. But like so many other components that may
have failed, you really need a meter to follow and measure
where electricity does and does not exist. Electronic more
often fail without any external indication which is why the so
inexpensive multimeter is essential.

Jeff Dieterle wrote:
> "w_tom" thanks for the info on transients and earthing - I guess,
> but I'm looking for info on the guts of a DTV receiver regarding
> fuse protection ahead of the modem
!