Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

How Much Power Does Low-Voltage DDR3 Memory Really Save?

Last response: in Reviews comments
Share
July 17, 2010 6:10:18 AM

This is the ram in my laptop, it is the best DDR3 non XMP ram on the market

http://www.valueram.com/datasheets/KHX1333C7S3K2_4G.pdf

Right off that spec sheet you see that the ram only consumes 1.8W maximum as is.....saving an extra watt is a joke (bear in mind under load my laptop is pulling 250W and it idles around 70W - I have an Alienware M17x)
Score
-14
July 17, 2010 6:26:31 AM

Hah, I knew that this whole "green memory" thing was just an eco-fad. Memory sticks usually consume as much as generic case fans and usually lower. Why pay a premium for the same performance but a ~1 watt - 4 watt difference?
Score
19
Related resources
July 17, 2010 6:34:15 AM

Low voltage memories like Kingston LoVo or G.Skill Eco doesn't necessarily mean reducing energy consumption. Low voltage can reduce heat produced, and also provide high oc potential under 1.65v. I got my G.Skill Eco 1.35v DDR3-1600 7-8-7 overclocked to 1.65v DDR3-2220 10-11-10.
Score
15
July 17, 2010 8:23:43 AM

^ That must've been the real use for those low voltage RAMs. A greater headroom for overclocking. But in stock, the only thing IMO that you could benefit from it was lower heat produced (which is negligible if you have a mem cooler and a good case airflow).
Score
8
July 17, 2010 8:38:03 AM

th
madvsfoolLow voltage memories like Kingston LoVo or G.Skill Eco doesn't necessarily mean reducing energy consumption. Low voltage can reduce heat produced, and also provide high oc potential under 1.65v. I got my G.Skill Eco 1.35v DDR3-1600 7-8-7 overclocked to 1.65v DDR3-2220 10-11-10.


well u are right u can overclock it more at a lower voltage and u are kinda of wrong when u said it doesn't necessarily reduce energy, u should do some research of the loVos and compare them the regular ram and you will find that the ram do has lower energy consumption
Score
-5
July 17, 2010 9:21:27 AM

Well, the increment in price isn't worth the saving if we compare it to increment in a power saving motherboard, or GPU. This should be something like coup de grace in designing the ultimate low power system, but definitely not the first step.
Score
5
Anonymous
a b } Memory
July 17, 2010 9:34:43 AM

Hey, that 4W under load is 2W per module.
If you use a server with 18 ram slots filled, then that is 32W in all.
In the 32 ram slot Tyan s8812 it would mean 64W in power consumption.

Taking that these systems run like 0-24 7 days a week, it DOES count....
Score
22
July 17, 2010 9:59:53 AM

CadilLACiHey, that 4W under load is 2W per module. If you use a server with 18 ram slots filled, then that is 32W in all.In the 32 ram slot Tyan s8812 it would mean 64W in power consumption. Taking that these systems run like 0-24 7 days a week, it DOES count....

In this specific instance, then yes it does count. However, consider that most readers on this site are users and not server operators. Also consider the added cost of populating all those RAM slots with more expensive RAM. These modules cost ~$170 for 4GB of DDR3-1333. You can pick up some G.Skill off Newegg for $81. Multiply the difference by 8 to populate all slots in the Tyan s8812 and you're talking about an extra $712.
Score
-5
July 17, 2010 11:34:30 AM

It never even crossed my mind to use low-voltage RAM as a mean to save power. To me the whole point of low voltage is either better overclocking headroom or lower heat output (and even that I'm not sure).
Score
1
July 17, 2010 2:13:13 PM

ares1214this doesnt make sense to me, considering a lot of the eco sticks are the exact same price as corresponding non-eco sticks, yet usually oc better:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6820231321100 bucks for that, i think ill take it.




read some of the reviews on that post and to be honest...who the fuck buys eco friendly memory and expects it to be an overclocking champ and complaints about the heat sinks quality. seriously?
Score
-4
July 17, 2010 3:33:06 PM

So for RAM it saves nothing :/ 
Score
0
July 17, 2010 4:03:40 PM

Personally, apart from fine-tuning my processor's CPU clock driver, the most power-sensitive steps I took were:
- using a large Heat sink with a slow fan
- using two 2.5" HDD in RAID 1 (the actual concern was on data safety, but power was a concern too)
- modifying my Radeon 4850's BIOS to use much, much lower voltage and clock speed when idle: 0.93 V and 160/500 MHz instead of 1.1V and 500/900 MHz. Probably cut the power requirements by 30W.
Score
3
July 17, 2010 4:33:16 PM

So there is a (small) point to LoVo ram instead of the silly Watt-usage comparisons done when SSDs are benched..
Score
0
July 17, 2010 5:47:18 PM

Test using a core i7 rig. Bit-tech.net did a similar comparison of these same modules 4 months ago. The reduction in voltage from "standard" 1.65v ddr3-1333 memory to these modules at 1.2v ddr3-1333 reduced system load wattage from 193w to 166.

THAT is a considerable gain, and I am disgusted that Toms chose to bench a single test configuration here - the IMC's in AMD and Intel chips are markedly different, and the only reason DDR3 is being made at this voltage is because Intel designed it's nehalem chips around the 1.5v DDR3 specifications standard, forcing manufacturers to start binning for voltage and not just speed as they had been doing previously.

For anyone interested, here's the feature article from bit-tech: http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/memory/2010/03/18/king...
Score
2
July 17, 2010 6:51:18 PM

any meaningful power saving can only come from the components that consume it in the first place : and that would be your graphics and cpu . from two sources : chip level power management (in tandem with the OS) and the fabrication (NM) of the chip itself .

i will hopefully replace my 5850 with something 28nm . someone (long back) on tom's said that graphics are going to be saturated , well , no . forget eyefinity , even with single monitors , the newer games will require a lot of juice , considering the holy grail - photo realism is still far .
Score
0
July 17, 2010 7:06:54 PM

I can imagine this is much more exaggerated with DDr2 2.1V running at 1.4V and 667mhz instead of stock 1066mhz .

The gigabyte mboard on demand tool helps a lot with power saving as well.

I think when the yearly bill gets cut down by $50.00 or more then people will start taking this serious or spend the money on burgers / beer instead.

Servers centre's with this low power ram or corporate company's 100 or more pc's will see a lower bill using low power parts and under clocking.
Score
0
July 17, 2010 7:57:20 PM

Honestly memory modules weren't the first thing that sprung to my mind when it comes to low-power components. But on the other hand, since it runs at frequencies with lower voltage than normal modules, I'm sure this will be a great potential for overclocking.
Score
0
July 17, 2010 8:59:42 PM

For consumers it seems to me this kind of low voltage memory should have been provided as SO-DIMMs for notebook use as the first market. Even a few watts could have a reasonable impact on battery life in such a platform.

For a desktop it seems pretty negligible though.
Score
1
a b } Memory
July 17, 2010 11:53:46 PM

Why were the kingston sticks chosen over the significantly cheaper Gskill Ecos?

As was mentioned up above, any chance we can get an OCing test done on the regular kit vs the low voltage kit?
Score
3
Anonymous
July 17, 2010 11:58:37 PM

I am just curious, what Intel chipset is on the 890FX Asus C4?

Drivers and Settings
Intel Chipset Drivers Chipset Installation Utility Ver. 9.1.1.1025
Intel Storage Drivers Matrix Storage Drivers Ver. 8.​9.​0.​1023

I own the Asus C4 with 1055t and have no Intel drivers on the machine at all!
Score
0
July 18, 2010 12:41:06 AM

To the authors: You totally miss the point with low power memory for desktops computers.
They are useful to overclock i7, because the memory controller is on the processor, and memory voltage increases the memory controller temperature, thus increasing the processor temperature, limiting overclocking.

If you use a low memory voltage, more energy can be dissipated by the core logic, allowing it to better overclock.

And Winrar and 7-Zip benchmarchs are bottlenecked by storage speed. Test them with a good SSD. Forget about WinZip.
Score
2
July 18, 2010 1:38:57 AM

"Green Memory" isn't an eco-fad if eco-concious people don't recognize it as an actual step towards eco-friendliness, eugene. Most of us are already undervolting memory, but also processors and even GPUs if we need them.
Score
0
July 18, 2010 2:20:57 AM

For those really trying to save on power, the ram is the last place I'd look. Spend the extra on a higher efficiency appropriately sized PSU. A gold rated PSU will save about 10 watts at idle over a standard.

Do low power CPUs like the "S" flavor intel have more OC room than the rest of the rank and file chips?
Score
0
July 18, 2010 3:00:28 AM

That's a shame but i guess alot of the RAM industry is about hype.
Score
0
July 18, 2010 6:16:07 AM

This memory is for low power cpu 45w and less.
Score
0
July 18, 2010 7:16:42 AM

ZentharIt never even crossed my mind to use low-voltage RAM as a mean to save power. To me the whole point of low voltage is either better overclocking headroom or lower heat output (and even that I'm not sure).

I've undervolted "standard" and "high end" components and found that cutting the voltage just a little bit can have a BIG impact on the amount of heat generated on processors and RAM. That, and because of less heat, less noise. Probably makes the components last longer, too.
Score
0
July 18, 2010 3:56:36 PM

And I run my 1066MHz cas6 at 1.65V. :( 

Wouldn't mind some 1.15V DDR3 1066 though.Mixed with a decent SDD, a i7 93 undervolted (and clocked to i7 920 speeds), with a slightly underclocked and undervolted 5770, I would only have to spend half as much on a decent PSU. :D 
Score
0
July 18, 2010 4:33:52 PM

everyone is worried about saving something...why bother...mother earth will be ok
Score
-5
July 18, 2010 5:10:34 PM

Such a little "improvement" does not seem at all worth the effort. If one is so concerned about low power system, GPUs and CPUs are first contenders for a "LoVo" solution...
Score
0
July 18, 2010 10:13:32 PM

bCubedSuch a little "improvement" does not seem at all worth the effort. If one is so concerned about low power system, GPUs and CPUs are first contenders for a "LoVo" solution...

One of the reasons is that RAM is one place that you can easily drop to half the bandwidth without a noticeable impact on performance (for us who aren't synthetic benchmark addicts).
I'd be running my CPU undervolted, but I have stability problems at even stock voltage.
The GPU is simply one area I don't want to compromise.
Score
0
July 19, 2010 10:24:24 AM

eugenesterHah, I knew that this whole "green memory" thing was just an eco-fad. Memory sticks usually consume as much as generic case fans and usually lower. Why pay a premium for the same performance but a ~1 watt - 4 watt difference?

Its not all about power savings, but also better cooling as low power memory produce considerably less heat.
Also 1-4W difference in consumption doesn't mean whole memory consume such, but quite more, its just difference between normal and low power memory modules.

So generally using low power memory modules, you save some power, reduce overall heating (thus reduce cooling needs) and improve stability/performance capabilities.

PS: Single memory module consume several times more then Case Fan.
Score
0
July 19, 2010 4:44:27 PM

Ok, so for decreasing electricity bill it is not useful. But what about temperature? I mean does low-voltage mean no special heat dissipation cooling in general? That would be more of advantage if it really requires substantially less cooling and has smaller temperature - I see it might bring some small overall decrease of ambient temperature inside case. Well, maybe next time in other review.
Score
0
Anonymous
a b } Memory
July 20, 2010 5:08:10 AM

I understand that this stuff is marketed as a consumer product, but the original application for this product is high end servers. Not talking about a two way system here. Some proprietary boards have enough slots for a terabyte of main memory. All those watts will add up when you have 256 dimms plugged in. Remember how FB-dimms were suppose to be the next big thing for servers about 5 years ago? They died the death when they added about 6 watts to the "price" of a ddr2 dimm. This was developed for servers and for some reason is being trickled down to the consumer.
Score
0
Anonymous
a b } Memory
July 20, 2010 8:59:33 AM

I got my "green (and cheap) rig" using undervolted Athlon II X2 240 (65W TDP) and the HD 3300 integrated graphics from Biostar's TA790GX 128M. Using K10Stat, I can go as low as 0,8 V for the P3 800 MHz CPU C 'n Q and 1,1 V NB Voltage with 400 MHz IGP clock speed. Assuming the work load is minimum, of course.

The RAM is still a dual channel 1,8 V (each) VenomRX DDR2 though. It's interesting to explore this "how-low-can-you-get" subject. With this article, I can finally discover how "low" my rig if it were using a lower voltage RAM. Surprisingly, not that much. Over $100 for a decrease of a couple of Watts? I think I'll just use my budget for the HD5570, higher graphics power in exchange for under 100 W of load is a lot more reasonable. Come to think of it, my motherboard never supported DDR3 in the first place...lol...(play dumb)
Score
0
July 20, 2010 9:45:55 AM

Low voltage doesn't mean low power, other things (hardware) will eventually kicks in if the systems needs to do heavy duty operation.
Score
-1
Anonymous
a b } Memory
July 20, 2010 2:21:15 PM

dEane: as a matter of fact, low voltage ALWAYS means low power. Since the Joule's Law states that Power = Voltage x Current, or something like that (duh!). It's the significance I'm talking about. Why should an average Joe like me buy this pocket-draining LoVo RAM which will hardly make any difference in my current setup?

The "other things" you're talking about requires delicate setting in order to achieve the goal of being "as efficient as possible". Try the K10Stat on your system, you'll know what I mean when you try it. Unless you're happy with the default Cool 'n Quiet, you might find that undervolting and/or underclocking could be quite challenging. Just give it a shot! Unlike overclocking, there's nothing to lose yet much to gain. Consider it an effort to help mother earth (and cut a few bucks from those electrical bills...lol). d(^_^)b
Score
0
Anonymous
a b } Memory
July 20, 2010 5:59:00 PM

I'd agree that the computer used for testing these ram sticks is not suited for the job!
You should have done the test on the Corei3 system of 25Watts idle you mentioned in the beginning of the article, or an atom netbook or desktop instead, where power consumption DOES play a role.
I'd fully understand noone would buy these ram modules and insert them in their Corei7 machine with a dual graphics card in SLI!
Score
0
Anonymous
a b } Memory
July 20, 2010 6:38:46 PM

Lower power consumption == less heat output == less Air Conditioning required. For every watt you save on your desk, you are saving about 1.5 more with your A/C use.

Power reduction is often like eating an elephant, you do it one bite at a time.

When you have a lot of computers, it really adds up. Say you save 4 watts a PC with 10 PC's. That's about 40 + 60 for the A/C or 100 watts of electricity. But more realistically, you replace each machine that uses an average of 100w with machines that use 50w (LED Monitors, greener internals), and that's 500 + 750 or 1250w. Almost 2 HP of power.
Score
0
July 20, 2010 7:28:21 PM

ProDigit80...noone would buy these ram modules and insert them in their Corei7 machine with a dual graphics card in SLI!

Wrong! My i7 overclocking limit is 500Mhz higuer if I go from 1.65v 1600 memory to one of those low voltage modules, and even more if I reduce memory speeds to 1200.
500 Mhz in CPU do matter.
Score
0
July 20, 2010 9:08:59 PM

ZentharIt never even crossed my mind to use low-voltage RAM as a mean to save power. To me the whole point of low voltage is either better overclocking headroom or lower heat output (and even that I'm not sure).


There are some small instances where a few watts here and there can help a lot, though they are limited. In environments where your power supply is limited and you want to extend run time as long as possible.

Boats, Campers, off-grid stations (middle of the desert), etc. But even then you're usually focusing on a very low power CPU setup as well, right now most of those are DDR2 (I guess some of these are starting to use DDR3).

Not often do you need too much performance there. In everyday use, its still not entirely the best choice.
Score
0
July 25, 2010 6:47:22 AM

is it possible to crash a DDRIII into a DDRII socket? :D 
Score
0
September 16, 2010 1:23:16 PM

if you save 4 watts per hour, thats a savings of $2.19 PER YEAR!!!! (thats if you run your computer for 24 hours a day with 6.26 cents per kilowatt


save 20 dollars in electricity if you run this computer 24 hours a day for 10 years!!! what a deal!!! Sign me up for 1000
Score
0
September 16, 2010 5:27:13 PM

For the common PC users such products doesn't make any sense but little helpful for sure to the people like me who are running 8GB DDR3 (4 sticks). Also, the conclusion is quite correct. Instead of investing on new RAMs dump those power hungry components such as GPUs etc.
Score
0
Anonymous
September 17, 2010 12:38:01 AM

This only makes sense if your a tree hugger and your looking at having a system run just what you need in terms of CPU speed and graphics. Obviously gammers could care less or at the very least will not be able to look hard at being green. I think low power goes with low performance. It reminds me of Netbook and Atom desktops. Something with energy conservation in mind. Its worse then trying to say your replacing your light bulbs from 75 watts to 70 watts. Are you really going to see it in your bill? No
Score
0
October 29, 2010 9:14:13 PM

It would actually make more sense to buy a 150$ power supply with a 85% efficiency or more and some cheaper memory modules - you'd save much more cash in the long term compared to saving a couple of watts on eco memory modules but having a 70-75% efficiency PSU.
Score
0
January 20, 2011 8:47:25 PM

There is an error on page one of the article: "DDR3 was specified by the JEDEC Solid State Technology Association to run between 1.5 V and 1.575 V." JEDEC specifies 1.5 volts plus or minus 5%, giving a range of 1.425 V to 1.575 V. See page 111 of JEDEC standard 79-3E.
Score
0
Anonymous
a b } Memory
December 13, 2012 7:04:11 AM

Of course it saves power! That's what is expressed there... Just the ram is not the most consuming component so percentage saved on the whole system is not huge...
Score
0
!