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Q6600 OC for the first time

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February 28, 2011 6:08:26 AM

My System:
Q6600 Revision G0
8 GB DDR3 1333 G.Skill Ram
MSI P43-C51 mobo
750w PC Power PSU
NVIDIA GeForce 8800GT

I'm new to overclocking and have read the Core 2 OC Guide. On my first try I don't want to do anything too drastic, so my goal is 3.0GHz. If I've understood the article, all I have to do is raise the FSB to 333 with the 9 multiplyer to give me 3.0GHz? Now with my RAM at 1333, I can't increase my speed farther without adding voltage right? I was unclear on what to do with the memory, so I will have to reboot and check out my bios for questions regarding the RAM. I was also concerned about my PCI Clock Synchronization. It says to set to 33.33 MHz, but its not an option in my bios. The PCI Express Frequency is already set to 100, and I know I need to turn off Spread Spectrum. Do I seem to be missing anything? Am I over worrying?

Out of curiousity, what kind of life span should I expect with a well cooled moderately OCed cpu?

I'm sure I will have more questions to follow. I'm still in the learning stage. Thanks all.

More about : q6600 time

February 28, 2011 3:25:20 PM

your FSB is quad-pumped, so 333 "Bus Speed" x 4 = 1333 "Rated FSB"
(using CPU-Z nomenclature)

DDR3 1333 is "double data rate" so the "DRAM Frequency" is 1333 / 2 = 667 MHz

Thus, your RAM is already twice as fast as the Bus Speed of 333 MHz
so there is really no need to alter the RAM speed or latency settings.


We have our Q6600 overclocked with an ASUS factory preset using SpeedStep:
333 x 6 (idle) and 333 x 9 (busy), and no other changes were needed.

Our motherboard is an ASUS P5W64 WS Professional, however (975X chipset).

Your P43 chipset is a bit newer, so it should be able to do the same
with no trouble.


Hope this helps.


MRFS

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February 28, 2011 3:51:38 PM

Thanks MRFS for the post. In the Tom's guide they manually inputed the timeing for the RAM. Are you saying there is no need to do this, or no need to increase those speeds? In my bios there were a lot more places to change settings for the RAM, thus my confusion. Do I input the 9-9-9-24-2N values and leave the rest on auto? Also if I use a RAM divider of 1:2 I would achieve a 1333MHz, but at the cost of minimal performance and lots of heat right? I just want to make sure I'm understanding things correctly, so far so good. Thanks again.
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a c 242 K Overclocking
March 1, 2011 2:02:37 AM

should learn how to thoroughly so that no error occurred,
most importantly still keep the temperature below 70 C when the full load prime 95 test stability.

if you want to increase the speed of RAM then you should look at Cpuz JEDEC table contains detail your Ram. oc ram should add also vdim 1.65 max for DDR3 that is enough.
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March 1, 2011 7:24:45 AM

henydiah said:
should learn how to thoroughly so that no error occurred,
most importantly still keep the temperature below 70 C when the full load prime 95 test stability.

if you want to increase the speed of RAM then you should look at Cpuz JEDEC table contains detail your Ram. oc ram should add also vdim 1.65 max for DDR3 that is enough.


Thank you for your response Henydiah, and sorry if my questions sound noobish. I'm just trying to learn.

So what if Im not trying to get better timings, but get my RAM to handle a faster FSB? For instance, my RAM is only rated for a FSB of 333, but if I upped the FSB to 360 (an 8% gain) what should I expect? Is this another way to OC RAM, or does OCing RAM have to do with the timings (9-9-9-25 in my case) and voltage settings? Thank you for helping me understand what is happening.
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a c 242 K Overclocking
March 1, 2011 7:36:04 AM

OC ram no problem there are many ways of improving and tightening the timming + FSB voltages add, if you're using DDR2 so you can raise VDIM to 2.1v.
timing slack for me does not matter as long as stable FSB DRAM the most important being increased and not far away from the JEDEC standard.

The higher the frequency the faster RAM
The lower the timings the faster RAM
But the timing and frequency is 2 things though conflicting results were the same that is faster

RAM the higher the frequency will be heavier RAM worked so well getting tighter RAM timings harder we work. So If we want high frequency timing and then we sacrifice if we want the Timing of low frequency sacrificed.
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