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Help me understand disk Health in Crystal Disk Info

Last response: in Storage
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December 29, 2010 1:40:13 AM

I've got an old laptop that now makes some stange noises when booting. I forst thought it was the fan cause lately the fan has worked harder. Anyway I cant really understand the status of the disk just by viewing it. It says disk is good yet it does show me some strange values I can't understand. Looking at smart in wikipedia didnt do it for me either.

Pls take a look and let me know if I need new drive asap or if I can put that aside for a while.



December 29, 2010 10:40:08 AM

Come on pls. Someone must have seen this before and can tell me what it means.
Ie what does the forst line mean "read error rate" and there are current, worst and threshold. What does a value of 100 mean? And what does threshold 50 say? So 100 is good or is it bad? If you see there is a bold blue butten that says Good Health.
But if that is so, why are so many values higher then the threshold values?
a c 127 G Storage
December 29, 2010 12:47:47 PM

Looks fine to me. Just keep a good backup for all your valuable data and you should have no issue.

You can try Wikipedia if you want an explanation for each SMART variable.
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December 29, 2010 3:05:40 PM

So I can assume the noises are comming from the fan then?
a c 127 G Storage
December 30, 2010 12:00:09 PM

Disks can make noises too; the noises can becomes 'sharper' and produce more vibrations. This would indicate a problem with the fluid bearings, though it does not have to indicate imminent failure. Such disks can survive for many years.

So while you can't really be sure whether its the fan or HDD without testing this yourself (stopping the fan with a toothpicker or whatever), you could just ease your mind by buying an external 2,5" backup disk and copy your stuff there, so you won't have to worry about losing your data.

Backups are the most powerful instrument to protect your data, with the current low HDD prices, a single external disk should be enough to backup most people's valuable data. Consider this if you feel uneasy about a possibly failing disk, since this really could happen at any time without prior warning.

The SMART data you posted earlier (can't access it now) didn't seem to have any signs of failure, though.
!