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E8400 Running Hot(New Build)

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August 12, 2009 2:57:32 AM

I just finished my first build 2 weeks ago and my e8400 duo is running at 60c idle and up to 74 when im playing call of duty world of war. My speaker has aduable warning from BIOS at 70c and it does go off. I have not overclocked it and i used two programes for these readings easy tune 5 and also everest ultimalte 5 the readings are the same.

The Temps are:
Motherboard 30c
cpu 60
core 1 70c
core 2 66c
My cpu fan is at 1730rpm
Running vista ultimate 64bit
My case is the antec 1200 gaming case (3 front 120,2 back 120 and a top 240) with the optional 120mm side video card fan all fans are turn up to max settings
i have a gigabyte GA-X48-DQ6 mother board
E8400 with stock cooler
Mushkin HP2-6400 High Performance DDR2 SDRAM 8 gigs total
OCZ 700w stealth PSU
HIS ice-q 4870 1gig turbo Video Card
LG sata and ide dvd burners
SAMSUNG Spinpoint F1 HD103UJ 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
IDE 38 gig Western digital harddrive.
Dual monitore syncmaster 226bw and my toshibha regza 42 inch tv

I would like to know why its running so hot and if there is anything that i should might add or change on my build. This is my first built and i purchase used(motherboard,CPU,Memory and case) and the rest new all for under $830 canadian
a c 102 à CPUs
August 12, 2009 3:09:10 AM

Since you bought used parts, did you apply heat paste when you installed the HSF (unless the HSF never was used before)? Are all 4 pins fully inserted?
August 12, 2009 3:10:51 AM

Have you tried reinstalling the hsf?
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a b à CPUs
August 12, 2009 3:13:13 AM

60 C at idle is not normal. For sure something is wrong, either the HSF isn't making a tight contact (loose push pin) or too little or too much thermal paste or poor airflow in your case.
August 12, 2009 3:31:08 AM

hundredislandsboy said:
60 C at idle is not normal. For sure something is wrong, either the HSF isn't making a tight contact (loose push pin) or too little or too much thermal paste or poor airflow in your case.


Agreed. Though that is a nice case, so unless there is a HORRIBLE wiring job, or incorrect fan orientation I think airflow should be good.
August 12, 2009 4:38:17 AM

Just finished pulling off my CPU heat sink and reinstalling it. Idles at 39c ran prime 95 got it up to 48c. Thanks alot but i got to say those push pins are hard to install felt like i was going to snap the motherboard. I guess that next build ill double check those pins. Hopefully i didn't do any damage to the cpu.
a b à CPUs
August 12, 2009 4:48:28 AM

That's the main reason I don't use Intel CPU's... there is absolutely no excuse to not use the latch (AMD) to secure the CPU.... I HOPE YOU ARE READING INTEL!!!!!

It takes me aprox 7-10 min to remove a cooler, remove the paste, re-paste and re-seat the cooler.....

With intel I had to struggle...... I do not know why Intel still opts to use push pins.....

a c 462 à CPUs
August 12, 2009 9:37:01 AM

OvrClkr said:
That's the main reason I don't use Intel CPU's... there is absolutely no excuse to use the latch (AMD) to secure the CPU.... I HOPE YOU ARE READING INTEL!!!!!



I do agree AMD's stock mounting system is far easier and superior to Intel's though I do not see that as a reason to not use Intel. Personally I would just use a bolt on aftermarket cooler for my own rigs anyway.
a c 102 à CPUs
August 12, 2009 12:12:36 PM

bensalter14 said:
Just finished pulling off my CPU heat sink and reinstalling it. Idles at 39c ran prime 95 got it up to 48c. Thanks alot but i got to say those push pins are hard to install felt like i was going to snap the motherboard. I guess that next build ill double check those pins. Hopefully i didn't do any damage to the cpu.

Once you get used to them, installing the stock Intel HSF is relatively easy. The CPU wasn't damaged; if it was the system wouldn't boot.
a c 172 à CPUs
August 12, 2009 12:23:11 PM

The simplest way to install the stock Intel heatsink is, contrary to the directions, to install the CPU and HSF onto the motherboard before installing the motherboard in the case. This way, you have easier access to all the pins and you can flip the board over to check the pins.

I have never had any problem installing the push pins. But then, I also always breadboard a new build. And like logain suggests, my two main computers (Q9550 and Q6600) have HSF's with backing plates (TRUE and Xig Dark Knight) installed.
August 12, 2009 4:14:51 PM

I think you should take the heat sink off and check your thermal paste. Even if you added more it might not make too much of a difference, but should reduce your heat to at least 55°C. I use Zalman Super Thermal Grease and it works wonders. Anyway, make sure you cover both bases...heat sink and CPU and place them firmly.

Also, check your BIOS voltage and reduce it to the lowest...probably 1.28Vcore or so. Even 1.30Vcore is fine. This is what will reduce your heat more than the paste can...about 10°C or more less.

Good luck ^_^
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