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Raid question

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December 31, 2010 7:29:18 PM

Hello, I have an HP computer that I'm going to replace the motherboard and CPU and memory in. Basically a new computer. I plan on keeping the existing Hard Drives, which are 2 250 GB SATA drives, and all of the other peripherals, like CD/DVD drives, etc. I'm beginning to thing I might have a problem with the HDD's, though. Right now, they are set up as RAID 1. I think that is right, at least. They show up as a single C\: 250 GB drive in "My Computer". Apparently there is no way to undo this which won't delete all of the data on both of these drives. Kind of a stupid arrangement, seems to me. What happens if one of the drives dies? I'm hoping that when I install the new MB, Which is a Gigabyte GA-880-GM-D2H, and perform a "custom" install of Windows 7, that it'll just let me format one of the drives and move on down the road. Is this the case? Or will the drive have information on it about the RAID situation, and hang right there?

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a b G Storage
January 4, 2011 1:18:18 PM

When you perform the clean OS install, you can connect one of the drived to the mobo, while the other one is disconnected. Win will format and install on that drive. After that, you can connect the other one, disk manager will initialise and format it, too. Make sure the BIOS is configured properly, i.e. not RAID, but I think the BIOS will come configured as such with the new mobo, so I would not worry about that.
BTW, that RAID 1 solution was not bad, meaning if one HDD went south, you can replace it and the array would be reconstructed at next boot. But, if you decided to go single drive/JBOD, then see above.
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January 10, 2011 11:24:16 PM

house70 said:
When you perform the clean OS install, you can connect one of the drived to the mobo, while the other one is disconnected. Win will format and install on that drive. After that, you can connect the other one, disk manager will initialise and format it, too. Make sure the BIOS is configured properly, i.e. not RAID, but I think the BIOS will come configured as such with the new mobo, so I would not worry about that.
BTW, that RAID 1 solution was not bad, meaning if one HDD went south, you can replace it and the array would be reconstructed at next boot. But, if you decided to go single drive/JBOD, then see above.


I've been asking around about this, and have uncovered some additional info. My MOBO uses IHC7 (ICH7?) intel raid. I guess it is software, but is listed as a device in device manager....anyway, there is a "raid management console" app on the computer, and a special raid bios available at boot to manage the raid drives. What I've discovered is that if you plan on keeping the drives in the original box, with the factory gear, and XP set up, but you want to get rid of the raid array without messing up your info, then the plan is to remove one of the drives, and boot with the other. When it boots up, it will look for the twin, but will offer you the option of deleting the raid volume. You may have to enter the raid bios at the next boot, and do the delete there, but when you finish, you'll have a drive that has the raid notification on the hard drive erased, and the MOBO will just see a regular drive. My bios on my original MB (Asus P5LP-LE (Emery2)) doesn't have an "enable raid" choice. That is handled by the boot up control console, but if you leave the raid bit on there, it will try to "reconstruct" the array when you hook up the second drive. To fix that drive, just put it through the same paces as above, and you will have two regular drives when done. Just back up the important stuff on the extra drive, and you'll have a bunch of extry HD space.

The second option is to clear both drives as a last operation on the old MB before installing the new system. This is the easiest option. just inter the raid control boot up bios, and delete the raid volume. This is the instructions given for this raid controler from Intel. I actually got the info from a Dell manuel after googling for removing raid volumes for awhile.

Thanks for your response!
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a b G Storage
January 11, 2011 3:37:39 PM

As you aleady mentioned, keeping the RAID on the old system config means you get to keep the old system config. If you replace the mobo, that's already a whole new system, so you have to follow the second option. If the new mobo supports RAID, then you can re-configure that after installing it.
According to what you have in mind; good luck with this project!
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January 22, 2011 11:48:38 AM

Best answer selected by protek25.
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