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~$3,000 Mid- to High-Range Gaming System - Help, Suggestions, Comments

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May 12, 2009 3:16:48 AM

COMPONENTS: As purchased, with recommendations from various posters.

Case: Cooler Master Cosmos S ATX Full Tower Case Black (RC-1100-KKN1-GP) (This was an early recommendation, and given that the price differential was small, I opted for it)

Power Supply: SILVERSTONE ST1200 1200W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply (As per Philip's suggestion for a well-regarded brand of PSU that could carry a heavy load)

Motherboard: ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Motherboard (Got this part right on my own, anyway!)

Processor: Intel Core i7 920 2.66GHz 8M L3 Cache 4.8GT/sec QPI Hyper-Threading Turbo Boost LGA1366 Processor (Make that two things I got right on my own...depending on who you ask)

RAM: OCZ Platinum 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Triple Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model (Thanks, Philip for the heads-up. It saved me a fair amount in terms of price per stick. I plan to monitor how the RAM is working out, and if the amount ends up being a problem, I'll pull a few of the sticks...otherwise, I should be set for a long time)

Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black WD1001FALS 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0 Gb/s 3.5” Hard Drive (Went the safe route...for now. The Solid State Drives looked nice, but not for the prices they're selling at)

Blu-Ray Drive: LG Black LG Blu-ray/HD DVD-ROM & 16X DVD±R DVD Burner SATA Model GGC-H20L (OEM, not out-of-box, as per a recommendation on here)

DVD Drive: LG 22X DVD±R DVD Burner with LightScribe Black IDE Model GH22LP20 (Again, OEM, as per recommendation)

Sound Card: HT OMEGA CLARO Plus+ 7.1 Channels PCI Interface (It was only a nominal amount more than the "fatal1ty" card that others suggested)

Graphics Card: 1 x POWERCOLOR AX4890 1GBD5-WH Radeon HD 4890 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready Video Card (I wanted two of these, but they only had one. Thanks for tipping me off to this variety, Philip -- I am concerned about the heat, and every little bit of cooling helps)
1 x SAPPHIRE 100269OCSR Radeon HD 4890 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFire Supported Video Card - OC edition (Philip, thank you again)

Speakers: Logitech Z-5500 505 Watts 5.1 Speaker (xthekidx...I know they're just about how you described them...and that's exactly why I chose this set)

Operating System: Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 64-bit for System Builders (old habits die hard, and for the sake of the transition, I'd rather stick with the evil that I know)



Questions that that I could still use an answer to, you wonderful, generous, folks, you...:

• As elementary and stupid as this may sound, I don’t know exactly how my ethernet/internet factors into all of this. Is it integrated into the motherboard, and I just missed it?

• Cords, cables, clips, clamps, screws, latches, nails, glue, paperclips, rubberbands, solder, bubblegum, etc. Is there a clear way of knowing exactly how many of these kinds of things I’ll need? Obviously, I’m being a little facetious with some of the items that I listed, but in all seriousness, this is the one of the areas that has me the most concerned. Were there things that you wish that you had known going into your first build? Is there anything (other than zip-ties, which are already on my list) that I should pick up prior? I've got the tools, but I want to make sure that I've got all of the little bits of hardware too.

• It's pretty much all wrapped up, except for the cooling options. I've got the fan that xthekidx suggested (Noctua NH-U12P SE 1366) in my cart already. At this point, I'm trying to gauge how effective the stock fans will be (someone mentioned that the case I upgraded to had better cooling than the 1000). Do I need to go nuts with the cooling and have one for hard drives, one for video cards, one for chipset, etc.? Or is one massive addition and the stock set enough?


Thanks to aford10 and kill@door and everyone else who had some input. Special thanks to Philip (who offered a ton of individual suggestions), and xthekidx, who offered a breakdown of graphical considerations that helped bridge that gap between novice and enthusiast levels of knowledge. Your time and suggestions are very much appreciated. Having lurked here a while before registering, I can say that you all seem like a very approachable, and helpful group of people, which isn't always the first thing that comes to mind when a novice like myself wanders into more serious tech-head stuff.

Hell, I don't even think I got called a n00b.

More about : 000 mid high range gaming system suggestions comments

May 12, 2009 4:13:54 AM

Drop down to six gig of ram instead of 12 (u don't really need that much)

I'm not really sure you need 1000 watts for ur psu, 750 should easily be enough, so get that based off of what brand you want

Don't buy vista ultimate, if anything just use Windows 7 RC 1, and do the upgrade when it releases, or use vista home premium (it's more or less the same thing for cheaper)

For cooling your case is amazing, and that should keep you cool enough for now, if it's not, then invest in some good 120mm ones (same as ur case)

Besides that it looks really good

I can't really help you with all cords and all that stuff (not really smart enough for that off the top of my head) but don't worry about having trouble doing everything on ur first time (especially if you'll have another computer with internet at the same time)
May 12, 2009 5:48:11 AM

Wow what a topic. FYI, you are not looking to build a "midrange gaming system," this is top of the line you are considering.

Ok so first off, your most important need for this is gaming, and you are running a 25x16 resolution monitor. For that I would suggest going with dual GTX 295's.

Then to power those GTX 295's, I would get a Corsair 1000HX PSU, that one you are looking at right now is not the greatest. Maybe a PC Power & Cooling 1200w if you will go with liquid cooling, just to make sure your bases are covered.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For Dual Graphics cards, you picked the best motherboard IMO due to the extra spacing of the PCIEx16 slots. Well done.

The Processor you picked is the best buy of the i7's and would be my recommendation. You do have a rather generous budget though and might consider a 950 when it comes out.

Since a low noise level is a primary concern and you have the budget for it, I would suggest going with a liquid cooling setup. It will give you the best cooling for components and be quiet. Someone else will need to suggest an good LCS for the i7, I am not aware of a good one off the top of my head. If you decide that a LCS is not for you, then the Noctua NH-U12P SE 1366 is the best quiet CPU cooler around.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For the HDD's, The WD1001FALS is excellent, but I think you would be a good candidate to consider SSD's. The Hard drive has a profound effect on how fast your computer responds to your requests. Consider getting an OCZ Vertex SSD for your operating system and games, like this one, maybe a couple in RAID 0:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I think that you should look into getting the Antec P193 case. This case is quiet, and isn't flashy, but is high qualitity and has better cooling than the Cosmos 1000.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

6gb of ram is plenty for your needs, so you can cut back a little there unless you really want all that ram.
Related resources
May 12, 2009 12:39:16 PM

Instead of spending $355 on a single GTX 285, why not get 2 radeon 4890s for $480 together. Here you can read a review of a GTX 285 SLI VS Radeon 4890 CrossfireX. The Radeons win about half of the benchmarks, and when they lose they lose by very little. Is the extra 115$ per card justify 3-4 frames? I don't think so. Also all 4890s come with a $20 MIR, get 2 and there is $40.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$260 (OC version)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$245 (regular)
Also if you plan to watercool, you can get these 4890s which come with a water block: (I'm pretty sure you need these to watercool the gpu right? I have never done anything

with water cooling so I dont know, tell if Im wrong please!)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$340 ($20 MIR)

Also if you are getting the regular cosmos, I suggest paying an extra $20 and get the Cosmos S, looks much cooler and cools better.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$200

If you can live without Corsair RAM then you can go with OCZ for cheaper price and faster timings, 6GB DDR3 1600 7-7-7-24 (also comes with a $20 MIR, get two packs for a $40 MIR) (They are on sale from $140, they have been there for a while)
2 x http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
2 $95 = $190

I havn't hard of that PSU, since the PSU is really the most important part of your computer, I say go with this Corsair for $40 more.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Also do you really need Vista Ultimate? I mean from what I have read all of there extra features target business owners, it doesn't seem like something you would need much of. Home premium is $100:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I don't recommend getting SSDs because they are WAYY to expensive right now, I suggest using regular hard drives or Velociraptors, then eventually making the switch when cheaper prices and higher capacities come out.

Do you need a sound card? X58 Motherboards come with good integrated audio, but for that little extra you could try out:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$140

Hope this helps, and I hope I didn't miss anything.
May 12, 2009 12:48:14 PM

I want to tell OP that u dun need to splash $3k on a high end gaming rig but peeps will call me cheapskate LOL
May 12, 2009 1:06:35 PM

tidefan94 said:
Drop down to six gig of ram instead of 12 (u don't really need that much)

I'm not really sure you need 1000 watts for ur psu, 750 should easily be enough, so get that based off of what brand you want

Don't buy vista ultimate, if anything just use Windows 7 RC 1, and do the upgrade when it releases, or use vista home premium (it's more or less the same thing for cheaper)

For cooling your case is amazing, and that should keep you cool enough for now, if it's not, then invest in some good 120mm ones (same as ur case)

Besides that it looks really good

I can't really help you with all cords and all that stuff (not really smart enough for that off the top of my head) but don't worry about having trouble doing everything on ur first time (especially if you'll have another computer with internet at the same time)



I'll make an effort to respond to everyone's feedback, given that you're being generous with your time and expertise. Of course, as these comments are added (2 so far), I've thought of things that I should've mentioned in my original post but didn't.

And I'll preface this with an amusing observation: living on the loveliest village in the plains (as I do), and seeing your username makes me know how the ancient Trojans must have felt when they said: "sure, we'll take it -- we LOVE horses!". I kid. Had you suggested the ACME brand TNT-1200 power supply with C4 RAM chips and Thermite heating compund though, I might've been skeptical.

To respond to each point though:

- RAM: I see that the poster below you mentioned the very same thing, and you're probably right about it. With my current system (purchased in December 2005), the default option for my Dell system was 1 GB, but it had the options for 2 and 4 GB upgrades. It was a couple of hundred bucks (maybe $300-400), so I jumped up to the 4 GB. I never regretted it, even though I got a few comments about why I would want such an ungodly amount of RAM (for that time). Fast-forward to now. I guess that I was operating off of the same principle this time, and to be honest, the price difference between 12 GB and 6 GB on NewEgg was $244.00 versus $166.00. The $78 difference was something that I was completely comfortable with. Now, if you're telling me that it's going to be worse, in terms of lagging (latency, etc.), then I'm all ears.

- Power Supply: I actually started off thinking that I'd need something a lot lower, given what my current system uses, but the more I read, the more concerned I became about overloading one that wasn't strong enough, and frying something in the process. I also thought that it would be necessary for overclocking, which I hope to do at some point when I'm less of a hopeless dumbass. I freely admit that I'm a novice, so if the majority of comments are leaning in your direction, I'll certainly be taking heed.

- Case: I know that a lot of folks on here might turn their noses up at it, but I did my searching by trading off between NewEgg and Amazon, checking for average ratings, comparing prices, and getting a feel for what seemed to be near the top of the heap on both sites in both of those categories. I read that this particular case is ghastly in terms of weight (and isn't all that sexy), but that it had loads of room to work within, and for expansion. That was key to me, as I've not got the experience to MacGuyver my way around any tight spots involving drives that are just a little too big or cable threading issues. I see from the poster below, however, that I might not be as set in this area as I thought, so we'll see. I need to check out the one that he's recommending.

- Operating System: Call it software-induced Stockholm Syndrome, but I've been running Windows Vista Ultimate (albeit the 32-bit variety) for two years now. I've grown to like it. Why no, nothing tastes wrong with this Kool-Aid at all. In all seriousness though, given that I've been operating under it for two years, and I do hope to do some direct transferring from one drive to another, I was favoring consistency. Your point is well-taken.

Thank you very much for giving me your thoughts. Although I may hate you for one long weekend at the end of November, you've got my respect.

May 12, 2009 1:15:43 PM

Really never trust reviews and rating when it comes to hardware or pretty much anything technology related. Why? People are stupid. On Newegg for example they will give a product 1/5 because it was DOA. They didn't even try the product and feel as if it sucks because it was DOA. The Cosmos S is only $20 more and should be much better. Also I still feel that you should go with the OCZ RAM I recommended as it has faster timings and cheaper.
May 12, 2009 1:18:31 PM

batuchka said:
I want to tell OP that u dun need to splash $3k on a high end gaming rig but peeps will call me cheapskate LOL


Yeah, but I wouldn't call you a cheapskate for thinking that a good system can be put together cheaply. I know that I had my doubts, until I saw what a comparable system would have cost through Dell. Now I did already drop some dough on the monitor, so in fairness, that ought to be factored into the cost (just over a G).

Still, I came into the whole prospect thinking "Yeah, they SAY that you can build cheaper, but it's probably not THAT much of a savings." I really was 50-50, coming into this, on whether or not the pricing would make it justifiable for me. Let's just say that it MORE than makes up for the effort put in.

Now, to address your point, you self-professed cheapskate you -- see any places where I could drop the price without sacrificing any power?

And I'm not being facetious -- what I love about this site (in the admittedly short amount of time that I've known about it) is that you get a wide range of views. The capricious spender will give you his two cents just as readily as the budget gamer. ATI, Radeon, etc., etc.

Again, any specific suggestions are welcome.
May 12, 2009 1:19:51 PM

With that much of a budget, the i7 extreme would be my cpu choice. It's not the best price/performance, but it's the top of the food chain right now.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I'm a little torn on the idea of SSD's. They are overpriced. But my concern is more with reliability. They are so new that nobody knows how reliable they are. If you decide to go that way, I would advise frequent backups. There is a lot of upside to them though.

Great psu options from xthekidx. Not sure what tidefan is smoking, but 750w isn't going to cut it.
May 12, 2009 1:22:53 PM

philipV said:
Really never trust reviews and rating when it comes to hardware or pretty much anything technology related. Why? People are stupid. On Newegg for example they will give a product 1/5 because it was DOA. They didn't even try the product and feel as if it sucks because it was DOA. The Cosmos S is only $20 more and should be much better. Also I still feel that you should go with the OCZ RAM I recommended as it has faster timings and cheaper.


I'll respond to your other points in a bit, but I should clarify -- I take that into account. Hell, I took that into account when I was buying a set of sheets from J.C. Penney's website. I actually read the negative reviews first, as if there really IS a major flaw, they are the folks who would probably not have missed it (what with being so critical). With that said, I discount the ones that rate something a "1" because it arrived late and the box was bent.

Also, in almost every single case (I admit, I was sleepwalking on the optical drives), I read professional reviews (such as the ones on this site), as well as amateur reviews.

I'll comment on the OCZ RAM and case once I've had the chance to check them out. The case rings a bell, but the RAM I'll have to look into.

Thanks.
May 12, 2009 1:23:49 PM

I would not buy the i7 Exteme. I would never EVER pay $700+ more for a processor that has very little difference. Like he said 5k is the max, and he would rather spend much less.

@Above Post
That's good that you take the time to read all of those reviews. Alot of people who have problems with a product would review, the ones that don't usually review much less.
May 12, 2009 1:29:22 PM

I am with Philip actually : HD4890CF Haha +1 on idiotic NewEgg reviews lol
May 12, 2009 1:35:09 PM

Okay fine lets see, since he games, multi tasks, rips movies, and listens to music we'll look at the following reviews:
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/desktop-cpu-charts-q...
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/desktop-cpu-charts-q...
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/desktop-cpu-charts-q...
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/desktop-cpu-charts-q...

1st Review: 41 sec increase
2nd Review: 19 FPS increase
3rd Review: 23 sec increase
4th Review: 52 sec increase

Do you really think this is worth the extra $700? As the OP said "Up to $5000 (US as are all subsequent figures) or thereabouts, though that represents a ceiling that I’m not willing to exceed. The less spent, the better" Lets see what the OP has to say about this, I personally DO NOT recommend the 965.
May 12, 2009 1:40:00 PM

aford10 said:
With that much of a budget, the i7 extreme would be my cpu choice. It's not the best price/performance, but it's the top of the food chain right now.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I'm a little torn on the idea of SSD's. They are overpriced. But my concern is more with reliability. They are so new that nobody knows how reliable they are. If you decide to go that way, I would advise frequent backups. There is a lot of upside to them though.

Great psu options from xthekidx. Not sure what tidefan is smoking, but 750w isn't going to cut it.



Thanks for the response. In turn:

Processor: I thought long and hard about which of the i7 line that I wanted most, once I had narrowed it down to that point, and actually right up until ten minutes before I posted my message, I had tapped the 940 (293 GHz). The more I looked at it though, the price differential was staring me in the face, and I realized that that difference alone would nearly buy one of my video cards (or my RAM, or...well, you get the idea). On this site and a few others, I read that most people recommend the 920 because it has a respectable enough ceiling in terms of overclocking. Additionally, I saw that a lot of people have it listed for their own system. As much as my natural inclination is "faster...faster...FASTER" (and trust me...it is). I would like to keep the cost down a bit. I appreciate the thought, however, and who knows how I'll feel about in a year or two?

PSU: That was the only part of tidefan's response that I was inclined to reject. I'm just a little too concerned about being underpowered, and god help the neighbors for the profanity they'll hear echoing down the halls, should I get three months into this and realize that my PSU ain't cutting it.

SSDs: I am of the same mind as you, though my flirtation with them ended when I saw the prices. Though I have two additional drives that I would like to add in, I have no guarantees that they're going to work. I think the one may just be a brick at this point. With that said, I'll NEED at least a terrabyte of storage for all of the games and files I'll need to hold on a drive. The fact that they're new doesn't scare me, but arguably, I'd rather be backing up because it's a good, solid habit, and not out of utter fear that my data will be wiped out.

Thank you again, for all of your input. It's much appreciated.
May 12, 2009 1:43:22 PM

here is a high range build for $3,855.82 all from newegg


LIAN LI PC-P80 Black Aluminum ATX Full Tower Computer Case - Retail (it is very expensive case but it looks good and it has an excellent cooling and it is the ideal case for watercooling)

LG 22X DVD±R DVD Burner Black SATA Model GH22NS30 - OEM (don't get an open box with a budget like that)

2xWestern Digital Caviar Black WD1001FALS 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Hard Drive - OEM (in raid 0)

2xEVGA 01G-P3-1281-AR GeForce GTX 285 1GB 512-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported Video Card - Retail

HT OMEGA CLARO Plus+ 7.1 Channels PCI Interface Sound Card - Retail

CORSAIR CMPSU-1000HX 1000W ATX12V 2.2 / EPS12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active PFC Compatible ... - Retail

Logitech Z-5500 505 Watts 5.1 Speaker - Retail

2x OCZ Platinum 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Triple Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model OCZ3P1600LV6GK - Retail (this is an overkill but if you want 12 gb of ram then it is your choice but you don't need more than 6gb and i would get the ocz platinum as they have a very low latency))

ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 LGA 1366 Intel X58 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail

Intel Core i7 920 Nehalem 2.66GHz LGA 1366 130W Quad-Core Processor Model BX80601920 - Retail

Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium SP1 64-bit for System Builders - OEM(vista ultimate is crap in my opinion)

LG Black Super Multi Blu-ray Disc Burner & HD DVD-ROM Drive SATA Model GGW-H20L - Retail(don't get an open box while you have such a budget)

2xOCZ Vertex Series OCZSSD2-1VTX120G 2.5" 120GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid state disk (SSD) - Retail(in raid 0)

here is a water cooling system for $550.47 all from http://www.performance-pcs.com

Swiftech APOGEE GTZ Ultra Extreme Performance Universal Water-block
- Water Block Backplate Add Swiftech Apogee-GTZ-Ci7 Hold-down for LGA1366

Eheim 1250 - A/C Powered (110V) Pump (this Pump is a very great pump)

15xFeser Tube Active UV Hose - 1/2" ID (3/4"OD) Anti-Kink Tubing - Clear / UV Blue

EK-Multioption RES 400 Rev. 2
- Fitting Size 1/2" Barb for 1/2" ID tube
- Reservoir Accessory Add EK-ANTI-Cyclon

Feser X-Changer 360mm Xtreme Performance Radiator - Thermochill Killers!
- Nozzles Add Pair Bitspower Compression Fitting 1/2" ID 5/8" OD
- Shroud Add Feser TFC Xtender Shroud(s) - Blue

10xKoolance Resuable Hose Clamp [19mm, 3/4" OD]

2xFeser One F1 Cooling Fluid - Clear/UV Blue - 1 Liter

Edit:i confess that the build i posted isn't the best bang for buck but it contains very good parts)






May 12, 2009 1:47:54 PM

Did I say it was worth $700 more? The value of the benefits lie in the one with the budget. As you can see from my signature, I didn't do it. But I also didn't have that kind of a budget. I also wouldn't spend $400+ on soundcard/speakers, $700+ for graphics, 1k on a monitor, but that's just me.

The speed increases would be noticeable. Whether or not it's worth it, I guess is up to the OP.

May 12, 2009 2:10:03 PM

xthekidx said:
Wow what a topic. FYI, you are not looking to build a "midrange gaming system," this is top of the line you are considering.

Ok so first off, your most important need for this is gaming, and you are running a 25x16 resolution monitor. For that I would suggest going with dual GTX 295's.

Then to power those GTX 295's, I would get a Corsair 1000HX PSU, that one you are looking at right now is not the greatest. Maybe a PC Power & Cooling 1200w if you will go with liquid cooling, just to make sure your bases are covered.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For Dual Graphics cards, you picked the best motherboard IMO due to the extra spacing of the PCIEx16 slots. Well done.

The Processor you picked is the best buy of the i7's and would be my recommendation. You do have a rather generous budget though and might consider a 950 when it comes out.

Since a low noise level is a primary concern and you have the budget for it, I would suggest going with a liquid cooling setup. It will give you the best cooling for components and be quiet. Someone else will need to suggest an good LCS for the i7, I am not aware of a good one off the top of my head. If you decide that a LCS is not for you, then the Noctua NH-U12P SE 1366 is the best quiet CPU cooler around.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For the HDD's, The WD1001FALS is excellent, but I think you would be a good candidate to consider SSD's. The Hard drive has a profound effect on how fast your computer responds to your requests. Consider getting an OCZ Vertex SSD for your operating system and games, like this one, maybe a couple in RAID 0:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I think that you should look into getting the Antec P193 case. This case is quiet, and isn't flashy, but is high qualitity and has better cooling than the Cosmos 1000.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

6gb of ram is plenty for your needs, so you can cut back a little there unless you really want all that ram.



I've responded to posts below yours, but not yours yet. Trust me -- it's not a slight. I just have to do a little browsing and checking on things first.
May 12, 2009 2:21:19 PM

aford10 said:
You probably aren't looking to build a top of the line with a $5k budget either.

There is a significant increase in the benchmarks w/ the extreme.
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/desktop-cpu-charts-q...



Well, I didn't really think I was going to get "top-of-the-line". I was just looking for a good system that would be fast enough for me for a while. In a year or two, I'll look into overclocking, if its viable, given the power and heat constraints of my system.

I regret putting the $5K as the ceiling, as maybe it's given people the impression that I'm looking to blow a ton of cash. I'm not. All I know is that to get a pre-manufactured system (plus tax, shipping, etc.) was going to come in at over $4K. I'd love to keep it around the $3K mark. I'd REALLY love to keep it below that (hence why I'm currently looking into the RAM and soundcard recommendations that have been thrown out there). I understand if it can't though. At no point is it about making anyone envious or being pompous.

This is something that I saved for, because it's one of the few little vices I've got left. I don't golf, I don't go to bars, I don't have a car or boat that I sink money into. I stashed a bit of scratch and I want a system that'll put the smile back on my face -- not make me say "Oh, why yes, I'd love to play Empire: Total War with no particle effects, no anti-aliasing, and at a resolution reminiscent of its predecessor Shogun" or "Yay...there's an Oblivion Gate...time to watch my FPS drop into the low single digits" (and don't think I'm kidding).

I appreciate where you're coming from though, on the processor, and it's on my little list (I kid you not, I've got a little handwritten list on a Post-It) of stuff to reconsider. I do appreciate the help.
May 12, 2009 2:33:03 PM

I'd go with phenom 955 with a 4870x2 or 4850x2 or CF if u want. They point is I7 isn't that good unless ur wanting to keep it for a long time. If you have 3000-4000. Spend 1500 right now and wait for 1.5 years and buy a mid range comp again instead of now putting all money in and after a few years ur comp decays to a very slow one. 940 or 955 phenom 2 with 4870x2 and ur set. Cheap mobo and a 650w would do it. Then buy a whole new comp in 1-1.5 years. This comp will do all ur games right now and max, but i recommend switching a dell monitor which has 1000 000: 1 contrast which means that it has better picture quality than ur 30 inch and rather for example when having a hard choice choosing gtx 285 or hd 4890 or GTX 275. Get a cheaper one and buy better monitor :D 
May 12, 2009 3:08:06 PM

rescawen said:
I'd go with phenom 955 with a 4870x2 or 4850x2 or CF if u want. They point is I7 isn't that good unless ur wanting to keep it for a long time. If you have 3000-4000. Spend 1500 right now and wait for 1.5 years and buy a mid range comp again instead of now putting all money in and after a few years ur comp decays to a very slow one. 940 or 955 phenom 2 with 4870x2 and ur set. Cheap mobo and a 650w would do it. Then buy a whole new comp in 1-1.5 years. This comp will do all ur games right now and max, but i recommend switching a dell monitor which has 1000 000: 1 contrast which means that it has better picture quality than ur 30 inch and rather for example when having a hard choice choosing gtx 285 or hd 4890 or GTX 275. Get a cheaper one and buy better monitor :D 


I'm gotta disagree with that logic. A new build isn't made to be good for only 1-1.5 years. Good maintenance will keep a pc performing like new for several years. You may see power output diminish on a psu, but performance shouldn't be the problem.
May 12, 2009 3:18:02 PM

@ aford10

I clean my pc inside the system and outside every other month too...helps a lot ^_^
May 12, 2009 3:18:56 PM

why spend $700 on a couple of GTX 285's when you can get 3 4890's (which scale better and will perform a good bit better) for about the same.

@rescawen, you need to learn your facts, a 750w is the minimum for a 4870 X2, cheap mobo's are, well cheap, I think everyone who saved a couple of bucks buying an ECS mobo found that out, you can only get 1,000,000:1 native on OLED and FED displays, however quite a lot of monitor's which are bigger than the usual for that resolution have Dynamic Contrast or DC which gives the picture better contrast by dimming the lights on dark frames.
May 12, 2009 3:22:47 PM

Man i wish i had $5000 to gind on a new rig...:( 
May 12, 2009 3:25:45 PM

Kill@dor said:
@ aford10

I clean my pc inside the system and outside every other month too...helps a lot ^_^



Sure does

Some may be scared of the crap that can build up inside the tower. A can of duster can go a long way.

Defrags, disk cleanups, virus scans, even a close eye on add/remove programs for unused programs can go a long way in keeping a system up to par.
May 12, 2009 3:28:51 PM

aford10 said:
I'm gotta disagree with that logic. A new build isn't made to be good for only 1-1.5 years. Good maintenance will keep a pc performing like new for several years. You may see power output diminish on a psu, but performance shouldn't be the problem.



And I'll have to agree with ford on this one (call it a compensatory gesture, since I'm not getting the extreme processor).

In my mind, he's right. My current system is nearly four years old, and works respectably, if with a few hitches here and there (namely, my piece of *** video card). The video card itself was an upgrade that I had to make last year, and even then, only because I didn't have the money get one when I built the system.

That upgrade aside, there's nothing about it that is utterly obsolete -- rather, I'm just ready for a new one. And if I got five years out of my first one (built on a shoestring, sub-$700 budget), and almost four years out of my second one (built on a tight budget), I see no reason why I can't build a system now that is going to keep me happy for at least five years. In fact, that was specifically the point of having more of a budget this time -- so I won't have to nickel and dime each year.

And lest it be thought that I couldn't possibly be happy with this system for five years, think again. If it weren't for the horror-story of an experience with Dell, I would never have had a desire to super-analyze GPU benchmarks and overclock specifications and research parts to the point that I'm counting RAM chips to go to sleep at night.

In short: I want to build this. A year or so from now, I might want to overclock. Other than that, I don't plan on cracking the case, except to blow a bit of duster in it and check the cable connections. I won't be kept awake at night worrying that somehow, some way, I could be getting three more FPS on Crysis. I plan on extending the knowledge that I've gotten from this experience, but I don't have the desire to be a regular tweaker. It's too much of a pain for a guy who works full-time, is finishing grad school, has a wife and three kids to pay attention to, and still wants to be able to waste a couple of hours playing Empire or Fallout 3. Where's the time?
May 12, 2009 3:34:45 PM

Kill@dor said:
Man i wish i had $5000 to gind on a new rig...:( 


In fairness, it took a fair amount of saving to reach this point. I just made the goal of setting aside so much each month.

I started right around the time (December 2005) that I had to build my last computer with Dell on too tight of a budget because the old one completely bit the dust (it was a laughable little Dimension 4500S...what can I say...we're all young and stupid at some point in our lives).

The compromises that I had to make were ill-informed on my part, and also significant enough to make me begin my budget preparation early. I still planned on buying pre-manufactured this time, but I finally had my "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it anymore" moment.

I think it's a good thing.
May 12, 2009 3:37:01 PM

aford10 said:
Sure does

Some may be scared of the crap that can build up inside the tower. A can of duster can go a long way.

Defrags, disk cleanups, virus scans, even a close eye on add/remove programs for unused programs can go a long way in keeping a system up to par.



(INSERT GREGORIAN-SOUNDING CHANT): AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA-MMMMEEEEEEEEEEEEENNNNNN
May 12, 2009 3:40:17 PM

That is a long time to save...you should be proud ^_^
May 12, 2009 3:40:22 PM

KTSnyder said:
Well, I didn't really think I was going to get "top-of-the-line". I was just looking for a good system that would be fast enough for me for a while.


My fault. I know in your title you were looking for a mid range system. Your budget just seemed more of a high end system. No problems though, you can classify it as you wish. They do that with case sizes.

It's good that you know what you are looking for and stick to it. There can be a lot of conflicting/varying and good/piss poor suggestions on here.
May 12, 2009 3:56:18 PM

Well you have a high end rig there man... and i suggest you learn how to overclock you system...its not hard at all.

First off, you will not need 12GB's of RAM. 6GB's will do more than enough and you won't even touch 4GB's at all...even if your CPU maxes out.

Second, you need to get Windows RC instead of Windows Vista...why...because Windows 7 is coming out end of this year. You can use Windows RC until it expires...by then you can get the full version if you decide to...or get Vista for (hopefully) a cheaper price by then. Even if Vista isn't cheap then, you are still a winner. All you have to do is make sure you back up files before March 1st 2010...and add them to your full copy. Of course, before we jump the gun here i hope you know you need a DVD disk to burn the ISO image from Microsoft to get Windows 7 ^_^. If not, we can explain in detail, its very easy...

Last...I would love to have that Cooler Master Case...its huge man (and heavy). You will enjoy it...and you have a motherboard tray to work with which is a major +1. You might need to add a few fans for air tho...quiet ones perhaps.


May 12, 2009 4:36:02 PM

Kill@dor said:
Well you have a high end rig there man... and i suggest you learn how to overclock you system...its not hard at all.

First off, you will not need 12GB's of RAM. 6GB's will do more than enough and you won't even touch 4GB's at all...even if your CPU maxes out.

Second, you need to get Windows RC instead of Windows Vista...why...because Windows 7 is coming out end of this year. You can use Windows RC until it expires...by then you can get the full version if you decide to...or get Vista for (hopefully) a cheaper price by then. Even if Vista isn't cheap then, you are still a winner. All you have to do is make sure you back up files before March 1st 2010...and add them to your full copy. Of course, before we jump the gun here i hope you know you need a DVD disk to burn the ISO image from Microsoft to get Windows 7 ^_^. If not, we can explain in detail, its very easy...

Last...I would love to have that Cooler Master Case...its huge man (and heavy). You will enjoy it...and you have a motherboard tray to work with which is a major +1. You might need to add a few fans for air tho...quiet ones perhaps.



Thank you. Enough people are advising against Vista, that I'm considering dropping it. To that end though, my question is this: if I've used it for two years, and really don't mind it that much at all, does it still make a difference? And what about the software installed on my system -- am I going to run into conversion and compatibility issues all across the board when I make a transition to Windows 7? What if 7 is as bad as everyone claims Vista is? I'll admit to being a bit confused on this front. I'll look into it further.

I'm definitely giving the other case suggestions some consideration though, but I don't feel that I've done enough digging to change my mind just yet.

You mentioned adding fans. This is one of the big areas that I need help in. I need fans. I know that I need fans. How many can I add, given my power supply and the drain on it already from the other components? I've seen a few suggestions for liquid cooling options thus far, but at this point, I don't have enough confidence in my abilities to tackle that. At least not yet.
May 12, 2009 4:51:58 PM

I really think that for the amount of cash you are putting into this system, its worth getting a very powerful graphics configuration. You have a monitor that runs at 25x16 resolution, which means you need a lot of power from your GPU's. Why spend $1k on a monitor and then not enough on the GPU's to make your games look good? SLI 2x GTX 285's average about 35-40FPS at that resolution in Crysis. Now Crysis is a much more demanding game than most, but games to come out in the coming years will be just as demanding if not more so, the technology keeps advancing. 35FPS is not going to be smooth gaming, it will get jumpy at times which bugs the crap out of me when I am gaming. I think either getting three way crossfire 3x4890's or quadfire 4870x2's should be your minimum consideration for graphics configurations, preferably 3 GTX 285's SLI or Quad SLI GTX 295's.
May 12, 2009 5:01:49 PM

What games do you play?

if you play FSX then it might be worth paying a bit extra for a Xeon Nehalem build or waiting for socket F+ but that would cost a bit more since you have 4 cpu's and 24 cores.
May 12, 2009 5:03:45 PM

You can still use Vista. I still use Vista Ultimate actually, but not as much as Windows 7 because there is noticable performance differences. For some, its not a big deal as everyone makes it out to be. The fact is, Microsoft did mess up Vista big time, but fixed a lot of issues with updates. SP2 Vista should already be out...maybe not. Anyway, keep Vista for now so you don't get too confused. Then look at Windows 7. Either way, Vista is here to stay for a while at least, and its not like you downgraded either...

As for the fans, thats a simple one. that case runs x4 120mm fans on the side panel. They are very simple to install...all you have to do is get four of the same and screw them in. Now, for good fans that are quiet and resonable in price... so look for anything under 17db and about 2000RPM's. Cooler master case fan brands are good, but they might be a little pricey.
May 12, 2009 5:04:34 PM

xthekidx said:
Wow what a topic. FYI, you are not looking to build a "midrange gaming system," this is top of the line you are considering.

Ok so first off, your most important need for this is gaming, and you are running a 25x16 resolution monitor. For that I would suggest going with dual GTX 295's.

Then to power those GTX 295's, I would get a Corsair 1000HX PSU, that one you are looking at right now is not the greatest. Maybe a PC Power & Cooling 1200w if you will go with liquid cooling, just to make sure your bases are covered.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For Dual Graphics cards, you picked the best motherboard IMO due to the extra spacing of the PCIEx16 slots. Well done.

The Processor you picked is the best buy of the i7's and would be my recommendation. You do have a rather generous budget though and might consider a 950 when it comes out.

Since a low noise level is a primary concern and you have the budget for it, I would suggest going with a liquid cooling setup. It will give you the best cooling for components and be quiet. Someone else will need to suggest an good LCS for the i7, I am not aware of a good one off the top of my head. If you decide that a LCS is not for you, then the Noctua NH-U12P SE 1366 is the best quiet CPU cooler around.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For the HDD's, The WD1001FALS is excellent, but I think you would be a good candidate to consider SSD's. The Hard drive has a profound effect on how fast your computer responds to your requests. Consider getting an OCZ Vertex SSD for your operating system and games, like this one, maybe a couple in RAID 0:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I think that you should look into getting the Antec P193 case. This case is quiet, and isn't flashy, but is high qualitity and has better cooling than the Cosmos 1000.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

6gb of ram is plenty for your needs, so you can cut back a little there unless you really want all that ram.



Okay, here goes:

Case: I do respect your input on the Antec P193, but I noticed that it's a mid-tower. Given cooling issues, the sheer amount of items I'm going to have in there, and that space isn't really a concern for me, wouldn't I want to stick to a full tower? To be honest, one of the items that I considered was how much room I'd have to maneuver and route things. On an added note, you did manage to pick a case that's even fuglier than the one that I picked out. It's okay. It's going to be sitting sideways behind the monitor anyway.

Power Supply: Thank you for the recommendation. Given that a few others said your suggestions were good ones, I'll be changing that to the Corsair variety that you recommended. It doesn't hurt either, that NewEgg has a great deal on it.

SSD: I know that I'm really throwing myself out there on some of these things, but the hard drive is the one area where I'd rather lay up than try to drive the green. They're also massively expensive, given the capacity, and I'd rather go the safe route on this one. Thanks for the thought, though.

Motherboard: I can't take too much credit for that wise selection. I just manipulated the search function in NewEgg until it was only showing me the beastlier of the boards. There was a Biotech variety that I flirted with, but between manufacturers and enthusiasts, ASUS seems to have a pretty solid reputation. I played the numbers, and just kept an eye toward more PCI, PCI-E options.

Liquid Cooling: Again, this is the great unknown for me. I might just end up getting the Noctua that you're recommending, given that the options for liquid cooling that are actually compatible with an i7 are extremely limited. I Googled it, and came back with animated gifs of tumbleweeds rolling across the prairie and sound clips of crickets chirping. To be serious though, one of the posters below listed all of the necessary parts for an i7-compatible liquid-cooling system, and I'm giving it some thought. I always thought of it as an ostentatious thing for LAN-party folks to brag about, but I really do have a legitimate concern about keeping all of the internal components cool. I'm going to have to think about this some.

The video card issue I'm not entirely sold on. I can be talked out of my current configuration, though I am pretty convinced that it'll do what I need it to. I've got no ATI/nVidia bias, but went with what appeared to give quite a bit of bang for the buck. Again, this particular part is subject to change.

All in all, I thank you for your very quick response to my questions, and I'm sorry that it took so long to get back to you. I know that you've probably got better things to do, but please feel free to keep giving input as it comes to you -- particularly if you have anything to offer in regard to the physical assembly (e.g.: what cords and cables are typically included with components; what are the ones that every builder finds themselves going out and buying; etc.).
May 12, 2009 5:06:49 PM

Or you could just go liquid cool with Asetek...which is what i would do really. But since you are still in the loop of building this PC, we should stick to the basics first ^_^
May 12, 2009 5:13:12 PM

^ or the coolit domino, but get a better fan for it since apparently the stock one is noisy and doesn't have great rpm/cfm.
May 12, 2009 5:14:25 PM

xthekidx said:
I really think that for the amount of cash you are putting into this system, its worth getting a very powerful graphics configuration. You have a monitor that runs at 25x16 resolution, which means you need a lot of power from your GPU's. Why spend $1k on a monitor and then not enough on the GPU's to make your games look good? SLI 2x GTX 285's average about 35-40FPS at that resolution in Crysis. Now Crysis is a much more demanding game than most, but games to come out in the coming years will be just as demanding if not more so, the technology keeps advancing. 35FPS is not going to be smooth gaming, it will get jumpy at times which bugs the crap out of me when I am gaming. I think either getting three way crossfire 3x4890's or quadfire 4870x2's should be your minimum consideration for graphics configurations, preferably 3 GTX 285's SLI or Quad SLI GTX 295's.



Ah, see, here's where the complete dumbass in me comes shining through. I listed the following:


• Graphics Card: 2 x EVGA 01G-P3-1285-AR GeForce GTX 285 SC Edition 1GB 512-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported
Link: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6814130446
Price: $709.98 ($5.82 S/H) (2 x $20 Mail-In Rebate)

...because I saw that the 285GTX is a 1GB card. I selected two (see: bolded part above), knowing that SLI meant that they could be added to one another. Hence I thought "Hey, I'm getting 2GB of graphic memory" That's right, isn't it?

And I mean that part about me being a dumbass. I really thought that this setup would have 2GB of graphic memory. It won't? Hell, I was going to ask about throwing a third one in there, given how well my budget had been going, but figured that I'd get ridiculed for asking (that, and I don't know if the motherboard/power supply could handle it all).

Your post jumped out at me -- and not just because I'm reading them all, which I am -- because Philip posted before to the effect of "instead of one GTX 285, why don't you get the 4890?"?

And I'm asking honestly here: is that item just being misread by some folks, or am I really screwing up and only getting 1 GB of graphic memory?

To make a long story short, I want 2 GB for my graphics. A 2 GB card is satisfactory, but I'd prefer to run two (2) 1GB cards. Hell, if the price is right, maybe three. I'm open to sales pitches from both camps on this one.
May 12, 2009 5:19:00 PM

I don't really understand what you mean, a GTX 285 is a 1GB card, but that memory hardly makes much of the difference when it comes to games.
May 12, 2009 5:28:11 PM

philipV said:
I really don't think you should be going with 2 GTX 285s, go with 2 x 4890 and save over $200. Also did you get a chance to check out the OCZ RAM I found for you? Like I said - it's cheaper and has faster timings. (And OCZ is known for making great memory, it's not some no name company)



I'll be checking out the RAM as soon as I get a chance. I'm not too hung up on names, though I did recognize Corsair as one of the big ones.

And I would like to tell everyone that I'm sorry if I'm being a tremendous pain in the ass with all of this.

I just want to make sure that I do this the right way.
May 12, 2009 5:30:23 PM

philipV said:
I don't really understand what you mean, a GTX 285 is a 1GB card, but that memory hardly makes much of the difference when it comes to games.


Yeah. The GTX 285 is a 1 GB card. I thought by getting two and running them in tandem, I'd be getting a total of 2 GB of graphic memory, with two cards providing 1 GB each. Isn't that most efficient?
May 12, 2009 5:37:14 PM

Well if you want to go with the GTX, but as I have recommended over and over again - if you are going to SLI 285, I say go CrossfireX 4890. Save $200+. The 4890 is also a 1GB card, just so you know, I DO NOT recommend going quad gpu or tri-sli/crossfire. Why? It has been shown to lower frame rates and performance.
May 12, 2009 5:47:57 PM

philipV said:
Well if you want to go with the GTX, but as I have recommended over and over again - if you are going to SLI 285, I say go CrossfireX 4890. Save $200+. The 4890 is also a 1GB card, just so you know, I DO NOT recommend going quad gpu or tri-sli/crossfire. Why? It has been shown to lower frame rates and performance.



I wasn't dismissing your recommendation. I just need to give it some thought. I've got no dog in that ATI-nVidia, East Coast-West Coast, Blood-Crips, Hatfield-McCoy feud that seems to persist among PC enthusiasts. Saving money for a comparable amount of graphic memory sounds good to me.
May 12, 2009 6:03:13 PM

I hope you don't think that having more graphics memory will inturn make your games run better. They will run better, but by how much? Extremely little. Put it this way - if you get a 512MB version of the gtx 285 for $75 less, you should buy it. What xthekidx meant was that if you only get 2 gtx 285s or 2 4890s that it won't be that sufficient (and it kind of won't in some cases). Don't think he is attacking you - he is trying to help. I dont know - some times a 3 sli/crossfire gives huge improvements then 2 sli/crossfire while sometimes a 3 sli/crossfire can worsen from 2 sli/crossfire, since the gtx 285 and radeon 4890 are still relatively new, we don't exactly know yet.
May 12, 2009 6:15:01 PM

philipV said:
I hope you don't think that having more graphics memory will inturn make your games run better. They will run better, but by how much? Extremely little. Put it this way - if you get a 512MB version of the gtx 285 for $75 less, you should buy it. What xthekidx meant was that if you only get 2 gtx 285s or 2 4890s that it won't be that sufficient (and it kind of won't in some cases). Don't think he is attacking you - he is trying to help. I dont know - some times a 3 sli/crossfire gives huge improvements then 2 sli/crossfire while sometimes a 3 sli/crossfire can worsen from 2 sli/crossfire, since the gtx 285 and radeon 4890 are still relatively new, we don't exactly know yet.


I appreciate your response, and I didn't take xthekidx's response as an attack, it just led me to wonder if I was misunderstanding.

I know that there are diminishing returns on increased graphics memory, which is why I drew my line at 2 GB. I'd heard of running three GTXs in SLI, but I didn't see a need to go that far just yet (unless someone could make a compelling case for it). I'm just trying to find my sweet spot on the curve, so that I'm not kicking myself a year from now, thinking "why didn't I just pony up the extra $200 or $300 then?

To a certain extent, I don't want to have to mess around with it too much for a few years, short of regular maintenance. That is until I decide I'm ready to tackle overclocking -- but that's a way off.

While I'm responding, I did want to let you know that I looked into the OCZ RAM. I do like the price difference, but unlike the Corsair, I didn't see any statement guaranteeing (or even indicating) compatibility with the i7 processors. From my experience thus far, i7 compatibility makes for some restrictive choices. Would this (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227401) work with the i7, do you think?

Thanks again. You've been a great help so far.
May 12, 2009 6:24:28 PM

Well sadly in about 6 months your computer will be "old" again since the new line of processors from Intel is coming out. About graphics memory - look what Nvidia is going, they are making 2 GB cards. Why? To make more money off of people who don't understand much about the hardware. That is why they didn't make the GTX 285 or 275 2GB, it's pointless. It's no problem really, I like helping out.Yeah of course the ram I gave you is good for the i7. Look under the specifications tab, then Tech Spec then Features - "Designed specifically for the Intel X58 chipset / Core i7". Just so you know the RAM has nothing with the i7. The motherboard is what connects the two, as long as it is DDR3 it will work. Hell if they made a X58 motherboard which supports DDR2 then DDR2 would also work fine, but they dont - why? To make more money. Either RAM is fine but the one you gave me is 1333, I gave you 1600 because it'll be easier for when you are overclocking, and your RAM will in general be faster. Also what I have been noticing is that prices of DDR3 RAM have been falling, FAST. So I say get one 6GB kit now and wait a while to get the second, who knows - you may never need another 6GB. Uh.. are those 505 watt speakers drawing power from your power supply? If so.. uh.. we might have a problem.
May 12, 2009 6:26:30 PM

Mushkin ram FTW! LOL
May 12, 2009 6:44:15 PM

philipV said:
Well sadly in about 6 months your computer will be "old" again since the new line of processors from Intel is coming out. About graphics memory - look what Nvidia is going, they are making 2 GB cards. Why? To make more money off of people who don't understand much about the hardware. That is why they didn't make the GTX 285 or 275 2GB, it's pointless. It's no problem really, I like helping out.Yeah of course the ram I gave you is good for the i7. Look under the specifications tab, then Tech Spec then Features - "Designed specifically for the Intel X58 chipset / Core i7". Just so you know the RAM has nothing with the i7. The motherboard is what connects the two, as long as it is DDR3 it will work. Hell if they made a X58 motherboard which supports DDR2 then DDR2 would also work fine, but they dont - why? To make more money. Either RAM is fine but the one you gave me is 1333, I gave you 1600 because it'll be easier for when you are overclocking, and your RAM will in general be faster. Also what I have been noticing is that prices of DDR3 RAM have been falling, FAST. So I say get one 6GB kit now and wait a while to get the second, who knows - you may never need another 6GB. Uh.. are those 505 watt speakers drawing power from your power supply? If so.. uh.. we might have a problem.



Understood. When I said "kicking myself", I guess I should have clarified -- I didn't mean in the sense that I get envious of the new chipsets and videocards as soon as they come out. I'm okay with that. I just know that last year I skimped on the graphical upgrade (went with a 256 MB card) when I could have gotten the 512 MB. And once I saw that my card was treating Rome: Total War (a 2004 game) like a Herculean task even after some tweaking and downgrading of graphics, I regretted not aiming higher. That's what I meant by "kicking myself".

I'm sorry for having missed the bit about i7 compatibility. It was probably just the fact that Corsair did feature it prominently that made me cautious.

Now as for the last part of your post. I hadn't considered that they could be powered by the power supply. I mean even my rinky-dink Dell special $10 speakers have a separate AC power cord. It honestly hadn't occurred to me that they might try to power the speakers directly off of the computer as opposed to using AC.

Now that we've established just how big of a moron I was on THAT one, would the power supply suggested by xthekidx (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817703012&Tpk=PC%20Power%20%26%20Cooling%20T12W%201200W) be enough to cover everything? What about with liquid cooling?

Now you see why companies like Dell thrive, despite atrocious service and support -- fools like me...
May 12, 2009 7:19:27 PM

I did some research, it comes with batteries, so does it use the batteries as its source of power? I say if you can, call Logitech and ask them, or go to the Logitech support forums, I HIGHLY doubt that it would take that much power from the PSU. Also when xthekidx was recommended a power supply, he was recommending a different brand, Corsair, Antec, Seasonic, PC Power & Cooling are the best. 1KW should be enough for pretty much everything. What I hate about Dell is that half the time you can't pick the graphics card, I got my laptop from Dell.. it lived a long life - playing Guild Wars, World of Warcraft, Oblivion.. Then as I was browsing the web (5 months after playing any game) the graphics card burnt out. Also the only reason that Corsair includes that bit is to lie people into thinking that only some DDR3 RAM works with the i7. It's just extra bullshit for marketing, and to pay for overpriced RAM. Another little trick they do is to include a RAM fan, but charge $50 more. A ram fan is $15 and you can make it yourself for 10. Also I can't see myself paying over $250 for a psu.
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