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First OC Build ~$700

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May 13, 2009 5:03:36 PM

APPROXIMATE PURCHASE DATE: within the next few months
BUDGET RANGE: < $700
SYSTEM USAGE FROM MOST TO LEAST IMPORTANT: gaming, movies, internet
PARTS NOT REQUIRED: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, OS (all are about 6yrs old except the OS)
PREFERRED WEBSITE(S) FOR PARTS: newegg.com, tigerdirect.com
PARTS PREFERENCES: No specific brand type, just the best bang for buck parts
OVERCLOCKING: Yes
SLI OR CROSSFIRE: No
MONITOR RESOLUTION: Any resolution will do

E5200 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/...x?Item=N82E16819116072
P45-UD3R - http://www.newegg.com/Product/...x?Item=N82E16813128359
4830 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/...x?Item=N82E16814102822
Reaper - 4GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/...x?Item=N82E16820227267
WD 320GB - http://www.newegg.com/Product/...x?Item=N82E16822136074
Fatal1ty 550W - http://www.newegg.com/Product/...x?Item=N82E16817341022
Antec 300 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/...x?Item=N82E16811129042
Xiggy S1283 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/...x?Item=N82E16835233003

I plan to get a retention bracket for the S1283 and some MX-2. I plan to only lap the CPU.

I don't need to play games at the highest settings available, just high enough to enjoy the game. I would really like to spend as less as possible, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. This all runs to about $550. Add a monitor and extras, its about $700.

What do you guys think? Anywhere I can save money?

More about : build 700

May 13, 2009 5:10:36 PM

switch the 4830 for an ASUS TOP 4770, and see if you can find a better cooler which can fit the 4770 and then you should be able to OC past 1ghz.

And switch the Reaper memory for another 1066mhz set which is cheaper.

Also swap the mobo for a P43 since your not using CF and the P43's OC better.
Related resources
May 13, 2009 5:15:44 PM

RAM...DDR2 1066 or better is good for OC's.
May 13, 2009 5:38:02 PM

Helloworld_98 said:
switch the 4830 for an ASUS TOP 4770, and see if you can find a better cooler which can fit the 4770 and then you should be able to OC past 1ghz.

And switch the Reaper memory for another 1066mhz set which is cheaper.

Also swap the mobo for a P43 since your not using CF and the P43's OC better.


Can you link me the ASUS 4770 or is the one that Kill@dor linked similar?

DDR2 800 are sufficient right? Or is the performance from having DDR2 1066 noticeable in real world?
May 13, 2009 5:42:46 PM

Very noticable with 1066...but you have to overclock to see it ^_^ DDR2 1200 is what i would really like for higher bandwith...but 1066 is a good stand.
May 13, 2009 5:54:02 PM

I'd just go Fatality...but both are fine. I don't have much experience with OCZ...i usually use Crucial, Corsair, Patriots (don't really like anymore), or G. Skill ^_^. I think OCZ is great too.
May 13, 2009 5:57:18 PM

Kill@dor said:
I'd just go Fatality...but both are fine. I don't have much experience with OCZ...i usually use Crucial, Corsair, Patriots (don't really like anymore), or G. Skill ^_^. I think OCZ is great too.


I only plan to OC the CPU. Do I still need DDR2 1066 memory even if I don't touch the RAM?
May 13, 2009 6:04:07 PM

Yea, RAM helps OC's on CPU too. Very effective combo if you do it right...so i suggest whatever mobo you decide to get...find and OC guide for it...then find an online mobo/ram calculator to see how much bandwith you get through your build..and how far you can OC. I bet that chip can hit 3.5GHz without trouble, but when you OC you have to know if you are overclocking for performance, or for statistics...benchmarks and so on.

So 3.0 - 3.2GHz is effective...with a 4GBs running @ 500+mhz frequency on your RAM. You can use CPUz to find that info out too. DDR2 1066 @ 500mhz memory frequency = 1000mhz dual channel. Its not entirely accurate...it depends on the board but thats an example ^_^
May 13, 2009 6:14:59 PM

That cpu OC's like a champ. The DDR2 800 will do nicely for you. I would recommend the g.skill pi black or the ocz reapers, both are very nice and reasonbly priced.
May 13, 2009 6:30:57 PM

Is there a cheaper mobo that will OC as well as the UD3R?
May 13, 2009 6:41:27 PM

@ Kill@dor - You need to do a little more research before suggesting DDR2 1066 RAM to everyone. DDR2 1066 is not necessary at all for an E5200 because it has about a 330 - 350 Mhz FSB wall . Quality DDR2 800 RAM with CAS 4 timings is plenty for overclocking an E5200 to the max. DDR2 1066 is only helpful for the Intel CPU's that will overclock to over a 400 FSB. The E5200 certainly doesn't fit that category.

I recently built a computer for my parents using the E5200 and got a nice 3.4GHz overclock using a 340 FSB and 10x multiplier. The E5200 has a 12.5x multiplier, so high speed RAM is a waste.
May 13, 2009 6:45:27 PM

What's wrong with giving that suggestion? And no i don't just suggest it to everyone...if they want to OC higher they can use that RAM...whats ur deal?

I have done my research...and i'm not always right of course...
May 13, 2009 6:54:06 PM

It's pretty common knowledge that most Core 2 CPU's don't need/benefit from DDR2 1066 RAM. I'm sorry if I snapped, I've just seen you rip off responses without much thought behind them. Even DDR2 667 RAM would allow you to overclock an E5200 to almost 4.2GHz (12.5 * 333 = 4.163 GHz). So unless you're using a CPU like the old E6xxx or the E8xxx series that are capable of around a 500 FSB, DDR2 1066 is just a waste of money. CAS 4 DDR2 800 RAM is just as fast as CAS 5 DDR2 1066 RAM.
May 13, 2009 6:59:34 PM

shortstuff_mt said:
This motherboard will overclock the E5200 very nicely:

GIGABYTE GA-EP43-UD3L LGA 775 Intel P43 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $79.99


What's the difference betweent the P43 UD3L and the P45 UD3R besides price? I new to OC'ing as you might have noticed.

So, are 4-4-4-15 low enough or should I get something with 4-4-4-12?
May 13, 2009 7:08:16 PM

Yea, but i'm talking bandwith wise here...not CPU clocking only. with DDR2 677 you can hit 12GB/s and with 1066 you can go higher than 20GB/s, expecially when you OC to 4GHz on the CPU. So tell me, where did i go wrong in my suggestion...?
May 13, 2009 7:13:06 PM

Since the Core 2 chips don't have an integrated RAM controller they don't benefit from the additional bandwidth. Only the AMD and i7 chips with integrated RAM controllers benefit from extra RAM bandwidth.
May 13, 2009 7:21:24 PM

Ok...so explain to me how i was running 19GB/s on a E6600...D975XBX2 (everyone knows this mobo does not OC well) mobo @ 3.6GHz? No crashes until i tried to go higher...I did clock mine down now to 3.0GHz only because of heat, but i could have left if there if i wanted. Crysis plays a whole lot better because of that OC...and i'm guaranteed 45+ fps constant on a 8800GT... I know gaming is another issue, but i couldn't run it on stock build. So if that's not benefiting me, then i have been misguided this whole time...

Originally, before my OC, my RAM was only running 800MHz...effective 12GB/s bandwith with a 2:3 ratio.
May 13, 2009 7:41:34 PM

I would choose the RAM that runs closest to the standard DDR2 voltage of 1.8v. If RAM is designed to run around 1.8v, the motherboard is more likely to set the correct speed and timings out of the box. RAM that needs 2.1v will likely run at a lower speed and with looser timings until you manually set those values in the BIOS.

I guess this is my long way of saying that I would pick the G.Skill RAM over the Patriot RAM. :) 
May 13, 2009 7:50:43 PM

There's no difference if I manually set the values in BIOS? You just have to do a little extra to get the timings you want? I just want to save as much money as possible because I'm a student and just don't have that much to spend.
May 13, 2009 7:54:20 PM

@ short: No answer...?

I may not have given him the best advice on what to get, but calling me out on a suggestion(s) is low. I don't know everything about computers, but i do know that with hard work and with a ton of research i have learned a lot about overclocking and how the computers function as a whole. So don't try to call me out when you have no idea what i have to offer for someone...maybe your advice is misleading to other readers here...you should think about that too!

Sorry for ranting on your post girk... and good luck with you PC.
May 13, 2009 7:55:48 PM

It's no problem Kill@dor. I can take all the help I can get.
May 13, 2009 8:08:02 PM

Kill@dor said:
@ short: No answer...?

I may not have given him the best advice on what to get, but calling me out on a suggestion(s) is low. I don't know everything about computers, but i do know that with hard work and with a ton of research i have learned a lot about overclocking and how the computers function as a whole. So don't try to call me out when you have no idea what i have to offer for someone...maybe your advice is misleading to other readers here...you should think about that too!

Sorry for ranting on your post girk... and good luck with you PC.

I'm at work and don't have time to argue with you right now.
May 13, 2009 8:11:05 PM

So am i...but thanks for the notice ^_^
May 13, 2009 8:15:39 PM

Thanks for helping Kill@dor and shortstuff_mt
May 13, 2009 8:28:21 PM

No sweat man ^_^
May 13, 2009 9:44:32 PM

OK, I have a little break here at work, so I'll try to quickly explain why Core 2 CPU's don't benefit much from faster RAM. Core 2 CPU's communicate with the RAM controller on the Northbridge over the the FSB. You will get the best performance under this setup with a 1:1 FSB/RAM ratio because the CPU can only send so much data at a time over the FSB. It doesn't matter how much theoretical bandwidth the RAM has if the CPU can't match that bandwidth. That's why going with RAM any faster than a 1:1 ratio will not cause any noticeable speed increase.

I'm still at work, so I don't have a lot of time to dig up a ton of articles. Here's a couple:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Core_2 - "Optimally, the memory bandwidth afforded should match the bandwidth of the FSB closely. "

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/memory/display/core2du... - "The memory bandwidth on Core 2 Duo systems is limited not by the characteristics of DDR2 SDRAM modules but by the bandwidth of the bus that connects the CPU with the chipset's North Bridge...More interesting are the results of the overclocked platform. In this case, there is more sense in using fast memory and the optimal memory frequency divisor is 1:1 (FSB : DRAM) as has been shown in our tests. In other words, you can achieve maximum performance by using memory with lowest possible timings in synchronous mode. It means that if you overclock the FSB to 400MHz, DDR2-800 SDRAM with low timings is the optimal choice. If the FSB is overclocked more, DDR2-1000 or DDR2-1067 SDRAM is the best option. An additional argument in favor of using memory and the FSB in synchronous mode at overclocking is that the 1:1 divisor is the most stable one on a majority of mainboards."
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