Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

CM Hyper 212 vs Corsair H50

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
March 15, 2011 5:45:27 PM

I am a first time builder and I am trying to decide between the Cooler Master Hyper 212 and the corsair H50.

Price is not an important part of my decision in this case because in Canada there is only a $20 difference between them at Tiger Direct.

Being a first time builder, I liked the idea of the Corsair H50. It has preapplied thermal paste that will suit my needs (no crazy overclocking) and it has a low profile so I don't have to worry about it interfering with other components. It also looks nice in the case (but thats not important)

But, the more I read about it, it seems that it has some issues. I have read a different instances of the cooler leaking a breaking components and although many of these issues seemed to get privately worked out with Corsair and their RMA services, I am sure nothing is certain. Also, I am using a CM 690 II with stock cooling in it and I am worried that I won't have enough because the cooler is bringing in air instead of pushing it out.

On the other hand, there is the Hyper 212 which I like for it's unanimous appeal and low risk. Unfortunately there are also issues with it for me. I have no experience with thermal paste application and the process seems very complicated and I am worried I might screw up. Also, the cooler is HUGE and I am concerned that it won't properly clear my RAM. (Looking at buying a new ASUS p67 PRO mobo and 2 x 4GB G.SKILL Ripjaws RAM)

So, which do I choose in this situation? Is leaking super uncommon in the H50 and my cooling is adequate? Or am I just paranoid about the size and thermal paste application of the Hyper 212?

More about : hyper 212 corsair h50

a c 324 K Overclocking
March 15, 2011 6:19:59 PM

H50 isn't that great...poor performer and has quality issues. H70 is better, but more expensive, still not outstanding performance for the cost. Many good air coolers will perform about as well as either of these solutions.

Thermal paste application is actually quite simple; there are countless number of YouTube videos that demonstrate this as well as some links in the stickies I have linked below. Typically, it is a matter of making sure that both cooler and CPU surfaces are clean, you apply a grain-of-rice amount of thermal paste to the CPU, and apply the cooler directly down...securing as the instructions state.
m
0
l
March 15, 2011 6:25:05 PM

I wouldn't be too worried about the H50 leaking, but I would choose the Hyper 212+ due to its unrivaled performance for price. The H50 is liquid cooling without the real benefits of liquid cooling. It'd work, but at least on this site most would recommend either going for the H70 or skipping both altogether. The 212+, on the other hand, is probably the most recommended heatsink on the market at the moment.

As for thermal paste application, for this particular model it's fairly simple. Add two or three rice-grain sized blobs parallel to each other and just set the heatsink down, rotating it ever so slightly. It can be intimidating, but if you're careful you really shouldn't have a problem. For better explanation, see http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

The heatsink is large, but it does fit the 690 II (have the cooler/case myself right now). That said, it doesn't look like I could fit an additional fan on the upper side panel mount. I also have G. Skill RAM with the same spreader, and though the fan on the 212 comes close and covers the first DIMM, it doesn't make contact and shouldn't be a problem unless you need to remove the first stick.


Overall the main drawbacks of the 212+ are part of installation. With a regular case you'd have to remove the entire mobo to install the back panel plate, but with the 690 II you have access to the back. It's not the easiest thing to set up, but the 212 was only my second aftermarket heatsink and it is definitely doable.



To summarize, if you want the best deal, get the 212. If you really are unwilling to go through the installation of the heatsink mount and thermal paste application, get the H50 or preferably the H70.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 324 K Overclocking
March 15, 2011 6:33:00 PM

There are other heatsinks that would also work, it all depends on preference.
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
March 17, 2011 5:39:50 PM

Leaking is EXTREMELY UNCOMMON with all of our Hydro Series coolers. Otherwise, and we would not sell them. Avoid the FUD.
m
0
l
a c 324 K Overclocking
March 17, 2011 5:56:14 PM

Interesting: I've read a hefty number of threads about H50 leaks and failures...although not nearly as many on H70's. The H70 seems to address some things the 50's fell short on.

I realize you are a Corsair rep; but that doesn't mean your opinion to support your own product accurately encompasses the individual results of many, many users.

I'll give the credit: these coolers do what they are intended to do for many people, without issues. They help with space issues that some cases need to have addressed.

However, their cost/performance is less than air coolers for lesser prices. There are also many, many people with failure, leaks, etc. I know that Corsair does a reputable job with RMA's on them, but to be honest, I'd rather have a product that really shouldn't use the RMA process as a selling point.

There have been 100's of companies throughout the course of history that have sold products that were failures or had very high failure percentage...but they kept right on selling. Does Corsair do that? It's debatable, depending on your point of view and who signs your checks. However, simply saying 'We wouldn't sell something that would be prone to leak or fail' doesn't necessarily mean that it's accurate or entirely true. I don't believe that every television commercial is true...if that's the case...every single car on the road is 'best in it's class' and has won a 'JD Power and Associates' award.

In real life, everyone doesn't get a participation trophy. We are here as forum users because we are the end-users of your products...we are the real-life reviews. If there are rumors, threads, information or posts about product failure trends...there is a high probability that there is basis behind it.

Fact.
m
0
l
March 17, 2011 6:09:00 PM

"but I would choose the Hyper 212+ due to its unrivaled performance for price."

Check out Scythe Mugen 2
m
0
l
a c 324 K Overclocking
March 17, 2011 6:26:36 PM

Quote:
"but I would choose the Hyper 212+ due to its unrivaled performance for price."

Check out Scythe Mugen 2


Either is a very valid argument. Simply buying a LCS cooler to say 'look at my watercooling' is the usual driving force for those coolers...and Corsair, Coolit, Asetek, etc know this. There are some scenarios in which an LCS can be a good purchase, but it's arguable that you could even use a low profile air cooler and accomplish the same goal at lower cost.

If you are going to argue an LCS cooler; fine, but come to the table with a valid argument for a specific application. The thing is, there are other alternatives for almost any budget; LCS, air or even watercooling. At least do your homework and be willing to stand up for the point you are trying to make.
m
0
l
a c 286 K Overclocking
March 17, 2011 7:26:01 PM

klbg said:
I wouldn't be too worried about the H50 leaking, but I would choose the Hyper 212+ due to its unrivaled performance for price. The H50 is liquid cooling without the real benefits of liquid cooling. It'd work, but at least on this site most would recommend either going for the H70 or skipping both altogether. The 212+, on the other hand, is probably the most recommended heatsink on the market at the moment.

As for thermal paste application, for this particular model it's fairly simple. Add two or three rice-grain sized blobs parallel to each other and just set the heatsink down, rotating it ever so slightly. It can be intimidating, but if you're careful you really shouldn't have a problem. For better explanation, see http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

The heatsink is large, but it does fit the 690 II (have the cooler/case myself right now). That said, it doesn't look like I could fit an additional fan on the upper side panel mount. I also have G. Skill RAM with the same spreader, and though the fan on the 212 comes close and covers the first DIMM, it doesn't make contact and shouldn't be a problem unless you need to remove the first stick.


Overall the main drawbacks of the 212+ are part of installation. With a regular case you'd have to remove the entire mobo to install the back panel plate, but with the 690 II you have access to the back. It's not the easiest thing to set up, but the 212 was only my second aftermarket heatsink and it is definitely doable.



To summarize, if you want the best deal, get the 212. If you really are unwilling to go through the installation of the heatsink mount and thermal paste application, get the H50 or preferably the H70.


The H50/H70 and generally, all the basic LCS kit aren't considerate as liquid cooling, more when air cooler performs the same or better for less price.

If you want something good with moderated budget, the Titan Fenrir is the way to go.
m
0
l
June 20, 2011 6:22:18 PM

FYI out of 2 of my friends who were using the h50, I've had one friend who had his leak on him, it did fry the motherboard, which Corsair was kind enough to replace, however his video card which had coolant leak all over the card. The Video Card still worked but is not in a condition due to the circuit board stain, that will still be covered by the manufacturer's warranty, Corsair would do nothing in that respect.
m
0
l
!