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POST issue on GA-P55-UD3R?

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November 2, 2009 7:05:50 PM

Using a GA-P55-UD3R board here.

When I turn on my computer after an extended period of being off (e.g., turning it off for the night), when I turn it on nothing is right. What I mean by that is Windows 7 won't boot (restarts/BSOD ; same with startup repair utility) and Ubuntu has loads of application errors.

However, if I turn it on and then power it down during POST, and then reboot it, it can boot to these OSes fine and runs flawlessly. I used to think it was a power issue because when I first found that rebooting it did the trick I thought I needed it on for like 15 minutes; I know now that the "procedure" can be done seconds after the POST screen shows, and so I'm rather stumped.

Additionally, my motherboard does not beep as it should; when I first built this computer, it gave a short beep indicating it had booted correctly; it stopped doing this, though, so I'm suspecting the motherboard is suspect.

Any insights or tips on what I can do is appreciated. If I am to RMA this board I need to do it ASAP (RMA window closes in a few days) but I really hope it's not a serious of any issue. I can answer any other questions if needed.

More about : post issue p55 ud3r

November 2, 2009 8:41:19 PM

I wonder if could be something wrong with the system files in windows 7 getting mixed up after restarts and boot ups? But you said that Ubuntu has a bunch of app errors as well, and your restore or repair utility is giving u problems. You could try a different hard drive and install a new OS on it see your motherboard keeps doing what its doing. You use a trick of power up..power down during post and that gets you back your OS's, its really hard to tell whats going on, your BSOD could give you a error code to look up...but like you said if the RMA window is coming up, why not get another one.
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November 3, 2009 12:46:54 AM

Well, I've been running system diagnostics and have confirmed that:

memtest86 checks out
HDTunes detects nothing, and I've been using this system enough to know that nothing glitches... No graphics glitches in games, no I/O errors, or anything
Prime95 can run without error

BSODs lead nowhere, they are assorted issues that I believe are only caused because of the reboots at boot time in the first time.

Additionally, before turning off my system tonight I'm going to reset the BIOS and see if things are different in the morning. It is a bother to know if anything is different because a "warm boot" (i.e., the computer's been on for hours already) has no problems. Only a cold boot yields errors. If I boot it up tomorrow and it boots fine, I'll assume it's the BIOS' problem; otherwise, I'll be triple checking my wiring again and looking into an RMA (if it isn't too late)
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Related resources
November 3, 2009 1:13:39 AM

Try disabling C3/C6 in BIOS~~~
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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 3, 2009 1:14:54 AM

What BIOS rev are you running? I just posted this elsewhere: these are effectively 'beta' boards (several second generation 'rev A' boards, with USB 3.0 have already been released...), and the BIOS revisions are a nearly continuous stream... Current (I think) for your board is F3m (they went through 'g', 'h', and 'k' nearly instantaneously!), available here:
http://www.gigabyte-usa.com/Support/Motherboard/BIOS_Do...
Don't use @BIOS; stick with the BIOS' own flasher, or the flasher included with the BIOS file...

I can't stress enough, for the people running the 1156/1366 platforms, to keep up with the BIOS revs continuously - there won't be anything you can consider 'final' for another several months, and each rev makes yet another bizarre symptom vanish...
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November 3, 2009 1:15:03 AM

I'll disable it if it isn't disabled from a reset. Unfortunately, I'll have to wait till tomorrow in order to fully make sure it works (or doesn't).
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November 3, 2009 6:35:10 PM

Resetting didn't work and I updated the BIOS to F3m... I'll be trying to contact GIGABYTE, I guess, unless I can think of anything else.
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November 3, 2009 11:50:36 PM

Disable the C3/C6 on BIOS F3m still no work? Have you changed anything in BIOS such as voltages?
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November 4, 2009 12:32:56 AM

No voltages have been changed and disabling that does nothing :\
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November 4, 2009 4:11:52 AM

Is your Quick Boot option set to "Enable"? How about test the system with optimized defaults and change nothing? :) 
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November 4, 2009 6:42:28 PM

Yep, disabled everything including the aforementioned and loaded optimized defaults. I'll be re-seating memory and processor today and see if that helps anything.
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November 4, 2009 10:40:15 PM

Hi Theta,
I have the exact same problem on my brand new UD3R+I7 860+8Go+1To+HD 5770.
I thought I had an insufficient power suply (Corsair 400W) and I just bought a (Corsair TX650W), and the problem repeat exactly the same way as before, and exactly how you describe it.
However, my solution to turn the computer on is to access the bios config at start and leave it on for 5mn/10mn, then restart and windows 7 starts normally.
all my bios parameter are on default.
After reading this post I have desactivated the BIOS QUICKBOOT and OS QUICKBOOT.
I will let you know what hapends.

Mars1
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November 4, 2009 11:01:12 PM

Well, I'm not sure if it is a relief or omen that someone else has this problem. I have a similar "solution" (in fact, yours was my previous one), where I simply boot it up and turn it back off, then start it up again and Windows 7 starts normally.

I've contacted GIGABYTE over this issue. I'm fairly sure it is not my PSU. I'm currently trying to find any beep code reference for AWARD BIOS F3m (since the motherboard manual lists beep codes for "Award BIOS" rather than motherboard, I'm assuming it is the BIOS that determines these? Also, those codes are for reference only and I want to make sure they are accurate to the newest BIOS revision).
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November 6, 2009 11:59:12 PM

Bumping this in hopes of any insight. RMA window ran out so I'm just getting to used to powering this up twice, and leaving it on often. Hopefully the problem doesn't worse (e.g., something breaks) and I can eventually fix it...
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November 10, 2009 8:44:44 PM

Ok... I had big troubles last days.

The problem with reboot was appearing every day after the installation of the full system, making the system completely blocked without any successfull boot after 2 days.
I had to reinstall win 7 64 ultimate twice this week end (and phone call to Microsoft to allow me to reactive my windows 7!!!).
I have done also all test you suggested here in this thread except latest bios upgrade (I am not a big fan of using beta Bios except if it says that it will solve my very specific issue...).
All bios feature EIST/ Cx... are all off.
I gain apparent stability those last 2 days by not installing any of the Gigabyte drivers included on the CDROM or on internet. (mobo sata latest driver issue?).

This morning after 7hrs off, the computer restarted without any problem at the first boot, but toonight after again 10 hrs off, the computer boot and finish with BSOD, several reboot, etc... same pain.
Then I applyed theta's method, while rebooting windows 7, right after the windows 7 logo apearing, I turned off then on (reset was not successful previously).

I am very nervous about this brand new system that I run with premium quality hardware, while I am also using only clean 64 bit software... weird...

I am runing off idea to fix this.

any help would be very helpful.
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a b V Motherboard
November 10, 2009 11:08:30 PM

Mars1,
What RAM are you using? Have you run memtest86+ to make sure it is in good shape?

I would recommend upgrading the BIOS, using the Qflash 'application' within the BIOS. Do NOT upgrade with the @BIOS software from within the OS. Gigabyte has been making changes to adjust for issues with memory (among other things) since the initial BIOS. If you are still running the BIOS that came with the board you do not have the benefit of these changes. I am running the latest, posted just two days ago, and have not yet found any issues.

If you need any help running memtest86+ or updating your BIOS reply back and we'll get you more detailed instructions.
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November 11, 2009 10:16:34 AM

Hi Ekoostik,

I have G.skill Ripjaws F3-10666CL9D (4x2Go 1333 @1.5v).
I have downloaded and flashed the latest bios F3 (thru @Bios without Hyperthreading, and with the file downloaded already: I have not encountered any problem, then reboot/load default/save to Cmos/reboot/Cmos config/activate HT/save to Cmos/win 7 start).
This morning, again, boot/BSOD/reboot/ theta's method to turn off after logo, then turn on, and i am now using my config that have started...

I have now downloaded Memtest86+ and will now do some test.

I will keep you informed about my test.

Thank you for the help!
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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 11, 2009 12:04:32 PM

Quote:
thru @Bios without Hyperthreading, and with file downloades already: I have not encountered any problem

take ekoostik's advice (which echos mine, earlier in the thread), avoid @BIOS like the plague! It is the number one killer of GB boards!

http://forums.tweaktown.com/f69/bios-flashing-how-qflas...
Quote:
This cannot be stressed enough. I cannot recommend using it AT ALL with all other available options

I have seen many Boards killed (IE: Bricked, that is your motherboard is now a brick and you will have to RMA your board) by using @BIOS. I would guess that more then 90% of RMA's due to a bad flash, were because of @BIOS alone.

Yes it may work for you once or twice but if you keep using it you will find out the hard way it is not a good idea. Windows based flashing has always been looked down on and likely will never be a accepted or recommended method to flash a BIOS


I often liken this to playing Russian Roulette... You might get away with pulling that trigger once, and only hear a 'click'... You might get away with it a second time, too... But by the third pull, the odds are starting to catch up with you - you keep on pulling that trigger, you WILL blow your brains out!

The underlying problem would appear to be that, unlike the other BIOS flashing methods, an @BIOS flash gone awry can overwrite the BIOS' boot block, which is the piece of the BIOS that, among other things, is responsible for the 'dual BIOS recovery' function; i.e., if your BIOS gets trashed, but the boot block remains intact, the boot block 'checksums' the 'working copy' of the BIOS (in EEROM, that you can flash), finds out it's bad, 'reverts' to the 'backup copy' (in ROM, that you can't 'futz' with, short of a soldering iron!) and loads it, with a couple of 'flags' set, to remind it to tell you about the BIOS' problem, and offer you options to fix it... Once @BIOS trashes that boot block, your board is a brick - you can only use it to prop open a door (and a real, actual brick does a better job of that, too...)!! :cry: 
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November 11, 2009 12:30:10 PM

I was not successful booting on USB key with qflash (I tried many bootable option and programs to format and include system on a bootable usb key) , so that is why I used @bios.
I will not redo it, I read all the thread!!!
your info about the bootblock dial boot convince me!

in future I will use bootable dvd/cd with qflash!!!
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a b V Motherboard
November 11, 2009 12:36:27 PM

As always, bilbat gives good counsel.

I went looking for a good warning about @BIOS, but I could've guessed he'd be in to share his wisdom before I found anything! bilbat, I hope you don't mind me referencing your quote in the future. Your analogy is right on.

Mars,
What steps did you take when trying to update from USB? The first time I did it I made some very simple mistakes and spent too long trying to figure out what's wrong. It should be as easy as:
1. Download the latest BIOS from Gigabyte's website (this BIOS file is basically a zipped file containing the BIOS updates)
2. Extract the contents of the downloaded BIOS file onto a USB stick by, for example, double clicking the BIOS file and choosing the USB drive as the target location for unpacking the files
3. With the USB stick still in the USB drive, restart your PC
4. During restart, enter BIOS
5. From within BIOS, enter the QFlash utility
6. From within Qflash, select the location of your BIOS files (the USB drive will likely be labeled HDD), and then the BIOS files

The mistake I made? I skipped step 2. Apparently I was in a hurry and then it took me far too long to figure out what I'd done wrong (or hadn't done as the case turned out to be). I would try with any new-ish, typical USB drive you have. I found that the drive itself doesn't have to be bootable. Just the right file system format, which it may be already anyway. Easiest thing is to test it first and if it recognizes the drive it's in the right format.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 11, 2009 1:41:47 PM

Quote:
I was not successful booting on USB key with qflash (I tried many bootable option and programs to format and include system on a bootable usb key) , so that is why I used @bios.

ekoostik, again, has it right. I see this over and over - no floppy, and problems getting a USB stick to be bootable... Why go through the trouble of making a bootable drive, adding the proper autoexec to 'lauch' the flasher - when the flasher built in to every BIOS is perfectly serviceable? It's just <end> from either the Logo (if you've still got that waste of space POS turned on!), or the POST screen; or <F8> from the main BIOS screen...

There is a good reason (actually, several...), on the other hand, to have a floppy, and to make a bootable 'BIOS flasher' diskette - if your systems gets really trashed, there is a procedure called a 'blind flash' that will sometimes recover; BUT, you must have your floppy first in the boot order before the crash, as, after the crash, you won't be able to enter your BIOS to 'make it so'! Another 'recovery' procedure worth pursuing is the fact that the <F11>"Save CMOS to BIOS"/<F12>"Load CMOS from BIOS" mechanism will store to other media besides the 'spare' CMOS 'slots', which means you can have your carefully 'tweaked', working set of CMOS parameters on disk, ready to recover if you are forced to flash your BIOS (which erases the 'stored' parameter sets...) to get your machine back in working order. And, of course, the default for cranking in the <F6> RAID/AHCI 'pre-load' drivers is floppy - a small investment in hardware (and of course, the 'waste' of a drive mounting slot) makes life so much simpler (and more secure)!

While I'm on the general topic, there's another point to be made - backups! If you value your years' of accumulated data - photos, MP3s, etc., as worthless - don't bother with backing up. If you do backup, do a restore! If you've never used your backup method to test an actual restore, that pile of DVDs that you consider a backup is nothing but a fond hope! This goes, too, for any major revision or version upgrade to your backup software; an upgrade may 'break' the software, or render your existing backups unrestorable - and you'll never know (unless you test meticulously) until the *** is in the fan - and that's the textbook definition of 'too late'!
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November 12, 2009 9:23:12 PM

This morning, again, boot/BSOD/reboot/ theta's method to turn off after logo, then turn on...

I continued my serie of test...
MEMTEST86+ (on a bootable CDROM/thru the iso version available):
- after completing all standard test in about 30 mn... no errors

but I will redo this test tomorrow morning when the computer will be cold.
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November 13, 2009 5:14:07 AM

I am having some similar troubles, I will be trying the above methods tomorrow. The problem started after installing the drivers on the disk that came with the mobo. If I format my computer and reinstall the OS but not the mobo driver cd, and then update bios, will I lose anything that my mobo needs to operate properly?
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November 13, 2009 10:46:31 AM

BINGO!!!

I boot up my system this morning after a very long time the computer was off.
I boot up on my cdrom memtest86+
- for 42mn of test, memtest86+ reports tons of errors everywhere in the Ram
- then reboot/ theta's method to turn off after logo, then turn on/boot on memtest86+ and this is now the test is running without any errors (while 2mn before memtest was still finding errors in the ram)...

it seems to me that gigabyte bios is buggy...

on g.skills site they explicitely wrote that they tested my model of ram with the Ga-P55-UDR3... is it a bios bug with 8gb of memory?


i need to contact gigabyte on this subject.

theta, do you have any feedback from them?

ps: bilbat, I like your avatar!!!! ;-)

ps2: in my previous messages, I have edited some typo errors... sorry for having forgotten to aware you.
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a b V Motherboard
November 13, 2009 11:30:05 AM

I was reviewing this thread last night and I noticed a couple things. First, while we're still discussing Theta's original problem we're coming close to hijacking his thread. Theta, how has work on your system go? What have you tried recently? Did you resolve the problem?

Third thing I noticed was that we never got very much details about Theta's hardware. And I realized that because as I re-read from top to bottom the second thing I noticed that hadn't really caught my attention before is that Mars1 is running 4x2GB sticks of RAM. This isn't necessarily a problem but it does raise some questions.
Mars1 said:
is it a bios bug with 8gb of memory?

That's one of the questions that could be asked. Might it also be 1 faulty stick? Mars1, two things I would try. 1) Take out 7 sticks of RAM, leaving 1 in the appropriate slot in your motherboard. In that configuration, do you get the same erratic behavior? 2) Run that 1 stick through Memtest86+. Pick a reasonable amount of time, let it run as long as you can. Then take that stick out and put a different one in, repeat testing. Memtest each stick individually.
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November 13, 2009 11:51:58 AM

Hi Ekkostik,
your post make me thing about other things:
"I noticed that hadn't really caught my attention before is that Mars1 is running 4x2GB sticks of RAM. This isn't necessarily a problem but it does raise some questions."
and so:
- when I installed the 4 ram sticks, I place them one next to the other in this order, so I may have unpaired the 2 sticks of ram. do you think that might be a probelm?
- for your test stick by stick, I will do it tomorrow morning after the computer is cold (it is now on to allow me to work on it), I need also to retrieve the mobo SN and open the computer to post gigabyte on my problem.
but ekkostick how the ram can have a problem if right after the second boot with Theta's method memtest86+ do not report any problem?
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a b V Motherboard
November 13, 2009 12:38:00 PM

Mars1 said:
- when I installed the 4 ram sticks, I place them one next to the other in this order, so I may have unpaired the 2 sticks of ram. do you think that might be a probelm?

Hm. I don't know. They're all the same right? Seems unlikely, though I would opt to keep pairs of RAM - even identical RAM - together. Which means 1 set in the 1st and 3rd slot, and one set in the 2nd and 4th slot. All that aside, possible RAM issue are why I want to trouble shoot with one stick of RAM.

Mars1 said:
how the ram can have a problem if right after the second boot with Theta's method memtest86+ do not report any problem?


I don't know. If bilbat or somebody thinks I'm taking you wildly off course I assume they'll speak up. But I like to rule things out even if they seem unlikely, and RAM seems a possible suspect at this point. And the way we've merged two people's systems here I'm having trouble remembering what you've tried vs. what Theta tried. I keep having to reread the thread. I also noticed you say you're on BIOS version F3. There have been multiple "F3" version. The latest for your board is F3n. Is that the version you have?
http://www.gigabyte.us/Support/Motherboard/BIOS_Model.a...

Mars1 said:
- for your test stick by stick, I will do it tomorrow morning after the computer is cold (it is now on to allow me to work on it)

I'd like to see any testing done with one stick of RAM for a little while now. Let's get your machine walking before we try to run. Which means BIOS at default (load optimal) setings. When you have time put one stick of RAM in the appropriate slot. According to your motherboard manual that's the DDR3_1 slot, which is the second from the CPU. (Page 16 http://america.gigabyte.com.tw/FileList/Manual/mb_mauna...(ud3r)_e.pdf) Let your machine get 'cold'. Try to boot it. Let us know if the same problem occurs. Also at that point after you've tested booting the machine it doesn't hurt to run Memtest86+ on that one stick.

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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 13, 2009 1:26:18 PM

There are two ways to use MemTest86+, and both are valuable... The first is to load one stick at a time, having done the "Load Optimized" with the first stick, and 'qualify' each DIMM, individually, (preferably running overnight, for more than one pass) to eliminate the possibility of a bad stick; then, load 'em all in, and run it again, to check the RAM setup; I know of no boards that will run more than two sticks of RAM reliably, without some kind of manual intervention - usually some voltage 'bumps', and often a relaxation of the tRFC timings; this is one reason that there is a 'web old wive's tale' about not doing windoze installs with more than four gig - most people who have more than four gig, don't have a 'rock solid' stable RAM setup - and the win installers are, in and of themselves, an excellent stress test! And, speaking of stress tests - most of the 'synthetic' stress tests out there don't really 'stress test' the whole rig - they are mostly designed to 'load up' the processor cores to see how well your cooling solution performs. I have said this often: my machine will run Prime and MemTest all day long at well over four GHz, but in 'real life', I can 'break it' pretty much instantly. My 'stress test' is: watch and pause an HD ATSC antenna 'stream' off a networked tuner, while recording an SD NTSC stream off the PCI tuner, while transcoding and 'decommercialing' a third stream to my router's NAS, while downloading/uploading a couple torrents - lasts about fourty-five seconds at 4 GHz, will run 24/7 at 3.8! It's one thing to run 'synthetic' tests (that's exactly why they are called 'synthetic'!), but in real life, to operate reliably, your system is doing a continuous 'balancing act' - coordinating large memory block transfers to and from memory, to and from various busses, being 'tapped on the shoulder' to service an ever-deepening interrupt stack twenty times a second, handling i/o to memory 'shared' with various pieces of hardware, notably your kick-ass video card, and on and on and on...
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November 14, 2009 11:13:45 AM

ekoostik said:
I also noticed you say you're on BIOS version F3. There have been multiple "F3" version. The latest for your board is F3n. Is that the version you have?
http://www.gigabyte.us/Support/Motherboard/BIOS_Model.a...


I have the non beta F3 bios (stangely when I went to their site only the F3 version was shown previously).
I have just downloaded the F3n and will flash it. the "Enhance memory capability" of this version makes sense to me in my particular situation.
Actually, I think I may do bios flash as first test and will do all other sticks test after.
I have a lot of test to do and will get back to you!

I agree with you bilbat on real activity/stress test. But my system is pretty clean without any exotic feature: except my 8Gb, I have not OC my Mobo and will probably never OC my CPU till I need it in my audio apps (ProTools 8/Reason 4/synful/cakewalk). The only "tweak" I have done is to desactivate in the bios all the energy saving feature that can interact and creates issues with audio app/flux.

For your 4Gb system install recomandation, this is a very interesting info, as I used to believe that it could have been better for the system to be installed from start in its "final" ressource configuration (so for a 64bit win 7, with its 8Gb), at least for an "audio worstation" I remember many recomandations from such specific professional users to install a clean system from start, without all the energy saving feature activated in the bios... by extension, I thought I needed to install the system with its final Ram configuration.

thank you all for your help,
I knows this thread is quite long on all those tests, and even if Theta starts it and do not give us feedback, I believe we have not "hijacking it" as we all encounter the exact same problem.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 14, 2009 3:34:42 PM

Windoze doesn't care how much RAM is there at install versus adding it - I have seen exactly one instance of it (and that was 7, interestingly enough) not 'seeing' all of added memory, and that was easily cured by going into MSConfig; one thing that is important to an audio/video rig is to 'minimize' services and 'useless' components running at startup; services have to be 'pruned' in the services admin tool, and Glary's QuickStartUp works great for eliminating the clutter. I've posted a fairly early version, as the later, more generic utility set is just harder to use...
http://www.mediafire.com/?lzz4gnzlmmz
It seems every damned s'ware company wants to 'take over' your machine, running updaters, and hardware 'watchers', and whatnot; so, after fifty installs, you have a hundred and fifty things you don't want running, hogging up your processor cycles, and your memory 'real estate' - Apple's iTunes is a great example: no, I don't want a &^%$ing update checker running day in, day out, I am perfectly capable of launching my own program to synch my iPod (if I wasted time on such fluff), and I don't want your crap watching my whole network for anything 'plugged in'! But, am I given any choice in the matter? NO! It all goes in, every time, and I am left to 'clean up the mess'!
Another handy tool is the Revo Uninstaller,
http://www.revouninstaller.com/revosetup.exe
which helps 'tidy up' uninstalls - surprising how many programs 'leave behind' directories, registry keys, and the like. Seems pretty simple to me - your installer creates thirteen registry keys, your uninstaller deletes thirteen registry keys - what, you can write C#, but you can't count on your fingers? (...and if you count on your fingers in binary, you can keep track up to, what, 2,047? :lol:  )
You also want a copy of the DPC (deferred procedure call) Latency tool:
http://www.thesycon.de/deu/latency_check.shtml
as most audio/video 'drop out' problems eventually trace back to excessive queue depth. I am meticulous about never installing anything with a 'ring zero' component, unless I have an urgent, practical, pressing need for it; for example, a buddy recommended AnyDVD to deencrypt movie DVDs, but when I looked at it - found out it installs, pretty much, as a device driver - thanks, but no thanks - I'll live with the old standby, DVD Decrypter - it may be limited and old, but I'm fairly certain it's not going to 'break' anything; same goes for iso mounters - untill I find one that doesn't operate at ring zero, I'll waste the occasional CD/DVD, and do my installs from there!
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November 15, 2009 3:41:00 PM

Hi guys,

By chance, I've stumbled upon this thread. And that's my luck since I have exactly the same config as you, guys (GA-P55-UD3R F3 revision + Core i7 860 + 8 GB GSkill DDR3-1600 + HD-5770) and similar problems. Seems that this config is not exotical, after all...
Since the beginning of the week, I've struggling with my machine to make it stable. I've already posted on French forum (by the way, sorry for my English) and discussed with Sapphire's support, but to no avail so far.

Here are my symptoms:
* The first installation of WIndows (XP 32bits for the moment) went without problem ... until I install Sapphire's Radeon drivers. Then, after a while, ugly red squares appeared all over my screen and then a blue screen of death appeared. After that, the PC wasn't stable for more than 2 minutes and kept rebooting. I tried to install 8.66 drivers, 9.10 drivers, 9.11 beta drivers with the same result. The PC behaved exactly the same way with Ubuntu when I activated ATI Proprietary drivers.
* Then, I noticed by chance that, that if my HD5770 card was hot enough, the PC didn't crash anymore!! That probably seems strange to most of you, but I've tested this feature for 2 days and as soon as the GPU Temp does not go under 38°C (98°F), the PC keeps running without any problem (even for hours). I've tested it on Ubuntu and Windows. On Windows, to prevent the system from crashing, I've tried to run FurMark3D continuously (but the CG gets hot) or to change the CG parameters thanks to ATI Tray Tool (reducing fan speed works for example). On Ubuntu, I still haven't found a perfect solution so far since HD5770 is still not supported by the latest ATI drivers -> Therefore, it's impossible to monoitor the temperature or to change the fan speed for example... However, running fgl+glxgears prevents Linux from crashing. I think that a long-term solution would consist in modifying HD5770's bios. But I fear to cancel the card's guaranty.

For me, this could explain also your problems: the HD5770 needs to be "warmed" before the PC can operate normally. However, the GPU temp seems impossible to monitor in Gigabyte's BIOS. On my machine, the bios always says that the GPU temp is 39°C, I've never seen another figure...
What do you think of it? Did you managed to have your HD5770 below 38°C (on my PC, I need to wait 5-10 minutes)?

Regards,
Papatte
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November 15, 2009 5:44:54 PM

Haven't been able to fix this yet. I am under the belief it is the BIOS that is to blame here; several different people are having a similar problem with different equipment but a common motherboard.

GIGABYTE wants me to RMA my board, but I'm not having that. They were no help. I'm monitoring this thread and steadily doing tests to ensure my hardware is right, but I've basically consigned to having to shut it down and power it back on every morning.

Again, no other problems after boot occur.
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November 15, 2009 6:09:06 PM

ekoostik said:
papatte, which version of the BIOS are you running? You said F3, but there's been numerous versions of F3 released. They are currently at F3n for your board.
http://www.gigabyte.us/Support/Motherboard/BIOS_Model.a...


That's a tricky question indeed.
I've installed the latest version available on Gigabyte's TW website (http://www.gigabyte.com.tw/Support/Motherboard/BIOS_Model.aspx?ProductID=3162#anchor_os). My stupid Firefox Browser redirected me automatically to this page and it is just written F3, so impossible to know which subrevision it is!
I will try to upgrade to F3n ASAP.

Papatte
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November 16, 2009 12:55:22 AM

Try manually assign every memory related BIOS options rather than leave it as "Auto".
E.g. manually give the timing like 7-7-7-21 (according to BIOS reported) but not leave them in "Auto".
Memory voltages too, manually set it to desired value.

BIOS might have done something like timing & voltage calibration at cold start.
There values may not stable enouthus causing the troubles. Just guessing~
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November 16, 2009 1:02:53 AM

I tried setting the voltages and timings as per G.SKILL's instructions and nothing happened. If the problems that these other chaps are getting aren't the same, it might work, but it hasn't for me.
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November 16, 2009 5:54:59 PM

bilbat said:
I've placed a copy of F3n here for you:
http://www.mediafire.com/?ymmj1ot2m2y
Comprehensive flashing instructions here:
http://forums.tweaktown.com/f69/bios-flashing-how-qflas...


Thanks Bilbat, I've flashed my BIOS with a F3n. I don't know if it's really better/newer than F3 on com.tw site since the F3 is dated 09/11and F3n 06/11. But anyway, the flash process went all right. First impression; the proc is damn slower. Previously, with F2 and F3, fail-safe defaults sets a 21x/22x ratio for my i860. The F3n revision decided to set a 15x/15x ratio (1.9GHz), which is curious... However, according to CPU-Z, my core is runinng at 3.4GHz... not very coherent. The rest of the settings seems to be unchanged. My G-Skill DDR3 1600 is still recognized as a 1333MHz RAM.
Concerning the freezing problem, I'm running right now the test (temp is 39°C and so far still no crash). I'll keep you posted.

Quick edit 2 minutes later... 38 °C and still the same red squares . freezing pb. I wonder if overclocking my DDR3 GSkill and my CPU could not just keep the case warm enough to prevent the GPU from crashing...
---
Papatte.
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a b V Motherboard
November 16, 2009 6:04:19 PM

After flashing the BIOS did you enter it and choose "Load Optimized Defaults"? I flashed my GA-P55M-UD2 numerous times and am running on the latest released the same day as your board's and have never seen it touch my processor settings.

If you did load the defaults you may have to set them back by hand. Or did you already?

I've been seeing a number of reports of stability problems with the new AMD cards. I also saw some people who were running with a Beta version of 9.11 and another report that 9.12 might be out next week. (Edit: I just re-read your first comment and noticed you already tried the 9.11 beta) One person was able to stabilize their system by installing the latest public (9.10) drivers only - that is, they installed the drivers and did not install the catalyst control center.

I'll keep my eyes open for anything else that could be related.
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a b V Motherboard
November 16, 2009 6:04:57 PM

I'm assuming this problem occurs when the CPU is set to defaults.
If it has this cold-start issue on defaults, its not acceptable, RMA the board.

I've had cold starts on boards before, and replacing the board fixed the issue (not the CPU).

My 2c.

Also my Gigabyte EP45 has trouble with certain video cards. If you have a spare video card to try, I'd try and swap it out, see if that changes anything. I'm not buying Gigabyte again.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 16, 2009 10:11:33 PM

papatte;

if you'd like, I could take a crack at some BIOS parameters to stabilize your situation - I can't guarantee anything, but I've gotten lucky before ;) 

We seem to have discovered that my favorite (and, to my knowledge, only complete) SPD 'reader', MemSet, won't work on P55s yet (but we're working on that...), so I've set up the following for fill in the blanks:
  1. >>>>> Channel A/B Standard Timing Control
  2.  
  3. CAS Latency Time
  4. tRCD ____
  5. tRP ____
  6. tRAS ____
  7.  
  8. >>>>> Channel A/B Advanced Timing Control
  9.  
  10. tRC ____
  11. tRRD ____
  12. tWTR ____
  13. tWR ____
  14. tWTP ____
  15. tWL ____
  16. tRFC ____
  17. tRTP ____
  18. tFAW ____
  19. Command Rate(CMD)
  20.  
  21. >>>>> Channel A/B Misc Timing Control
  22.  
  23. Round Trip Latency ____
  24.  
  25. >>>>> Channel A/B Reads Followed by Reads
  26.  
  27. Different DIMMs ____
  28. Different Ranks ____
  29. On The Same Rank ____


Try copying it to notepad, print it out, and then go into your BIOS and simply 'fill in the blanks', and we'll see what we have to work with...

Also, processor sSpec#, and RAM manufacturer, p/n, & DIMM count (may have missed this in earlier posts - getting a bit confusing...)

Bill
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November 17, 2009 1:01:37 AM

One of the three people having the same problem with the same board should leave their computer on for an extended time, rebooting if necessary for other purposes but keeping the board warm. To see if this effects the problem. Its starting to sound like some soldered component on the m/b is relying on expansion for a correct connection. Just my opinion. There also could be a component on the board (capacitor,resistor) out of spec (they rate at a given temp) that Gigabyte introduced on assembly line making GA-P55-UD3R boards. Again, just speculation. Sometimes you can only make one change at a time, which in this case takes a day(a night to cool off) to really test. If you have updated your bios, maybe changed a voltage setting, moved a stick of ram, you have now introduced 3 more variables which can hide whether or not you have fixed the original problem, and or made a new one.
*someone mentioned maybe isolating the problem with a warm pciE video card*? Popping in a old pci video card , would eliminate that area maybe being the culprit. ? Thats a lot of work, but it seems like some of you are going to be exchanging the board ?
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a b V Motherboard
November 17, 2009 6:37:50 PM

Wow. That's one loaded, and heavily engineered, board. Be curious to read how all those lanes perform when really put to the test. Even more curious to see the final pri$e.
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November 18, 2009 7:48:36 AM

ekoostik said:
After flashing the BIOS did you enter it and choose "Load Optimized Defaults"? I flashed my GA-P55M-UD2 numerous times and am running on the latest released the same day as your board's and have never seen it touch my processor settings.

If you did load the defaults you may have to set them back by hand. Or did you already?

I've been seeing a number of reports of stability problems with the new AMD cards. I also saw some people who were running with a Beta version of 9.11 and another report that 9.12 might be out next week. (Edit: I just re-read your first comment and noticed you already tried the 9.11 beta) One person was able to stabilize their system by installing the latest public (9.10) drivers only - that is, they installed the drivers and did not install the catalyst control center.

I'll keep my eyes open for anything else that could be related.


After flashing the BIOS, I always load fail-safe defaults (I think it's recommended by Gigabyte, or am I wrong?). For the moment, I don't change thes value in the BIOS; I don't want the system to be more unstable than that it is now :-).
When I have rebooted my PC this morning, the CPU ratios were reset to their initial values 21x/22x (turbo). So, I cannot explain the 15x/15x ratio values (transitory state)?

Concerning the Catalyst Control Center. that's true that, in the beginning, my Radeon card was crashing thirty seconds after the installation of Catalyst. Then, I tried to install only the drivers and it was better. It was still crashing, but after several minutes. There is definitely something with Catalyst Center. Personnally, but this doesn't solve my pb. I will wait for 9.11 final version as 9.10 does not support officially HD5770.

Papatte
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November 18, 2009 7:55:59 AM

bilbat said:
papatte;

if you'd like, I could take a crack at some BIOS parameters to stabilize your situation - I can't guarantee anything, but I've gotten lucky before ;) 

We seem to have discovered that my favorite (and, to my knowledge, only complete) SPD 'reader', MemSet, won't work on P55s yet (but we're working on that...), so I've set up the following for fill in the blanks:
[cpp]
>>>>> Channel A/B Standard Timing Control

CAS Latency Time 9
tRCD ____ 9
tRP ____ 9
tRAS ____ 24

>>>>> Channel A/B Advanced Timing Control

tRC ____ 33
tRRD ____ 4
tWTR ____ 5
tWR ____ 10
tWTP ____ 21
tWL ____ 7
tRFC ____ 74
tRTP ____ 5
tFAW ____ 20
Command Rate(CMD)

>>>>> Channel A/B Misc Timing Control

Round Trip Latency ____ 51

>>>>> Channel A/B Reads Followed by Reads

Different DIMMs ____ 6
Different Ranks ____ 5
On The Same Rank ____1

>>>>> Channel A/B Writes Followed by Reads

Different DIMMs ____ 6
Different Ranks ____ 6
On The Same Rank ____1

Try copying it to notepad, print it out, and then go into your BIOS and simply 'fill in the blanks', and we'll see what we have to work with...

Also, processor sSpec#, and RAM manufacturer, p/n, & DIMM count (may have missed this in earlier posts - getting a bit confusing...)
Proc is i7 860 @2.8GHz (133 x 21 (turbo mode 22)

Bill


Hi Bilbat,

Here are the values I read in the BIOS. As explained in my previous post, they are the default values. My RAM is 4 * 2GB F3-12800CL8D CL8-8-8-24 1.65V GSkill. I'm not sure how this could solve my pb, but let's give it a try.

Papatte.
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a b V Motherboard
November 18, 2009 9:06:15 AM

papatte said:
After flashing the BIOS, I always load fail-safe defaults (I think it's recommended by Gigabyte, or am I wrong?).

Everything I've ever read says to select Load Optimized Defaults. Including my motherboard manual - GA-P55M-UD2, step 5 of 6 under "Updating the BIOS".
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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 18, 2009 11:53:19 AM

Here's the deal:
Both of the 'load defaults' functions do kind of the same thing; they run a block of code in the BIOS that 'reaches out and discovers' what hardware is attached; to some extent, the system does this every time it POSTs, but the 'discovery' block does a more thorough job, notes what it's found, and then calculates and sets the myriad of 'auto' parameters that you'll see in every BIOS... The difference between the two: "Load Optimized" 'looks' at the hardware and makes 'optimistic' assumptions about what it finds - tries to set clocks fast, latencies low, tries to find an EPP/XMP table in the RAM's SPD and set up the DIMMs accordingly (although, in some BIOS, the XMP loader function is toggled on or off separately by a setting...); when you do a "Load Fail-safe", the BIOS again runs the 'discovery' block, but this time makes 'pessimistic' assumptions: sets clocks slow, latencies high, and pulls the 'low order' tables off the SPD - in an attempt to 'run no matter what!' This is why you want to do a "Load Optimized" every time you start up a MOBO, every time you re-flash a BIOS (which 'discards' your CMOS parameters), every time you change any significant piece of hardware - especially memory configuration (different sticks, different DIMM count, etc.) - unless - you are astute enough to know your BIOS and hardware well enough to reliably manually configure everything that you see set at 'auto' yourself! This is also why I recommend, with every overclock I hand out, that people become familar with the <F11><F12> "Save/Load CMOS to/from BIOS" functions, especially its ability to save the CMOS tables to an external media, as then, once you've worked at 'twiddling' your BIOS for two weeks to get everything tweaked to the max, you won't have to start over when you flash a new BIOS, or, god forbid, plug in a USB device which 'eats' your settings...
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a b V Motherboard
November 18, 2009 4:02:44 PM

papatte said:
I've flashed my BIOS with a F3n. I don't know if it's really better/newer than F3 on com.tw site since the F3 is dated 09/11and F3n 06/11.


Maybe the F3 version you found was an early release? It appears they've now replaced their BIOSes with non-beta version. For the last two days there's been an F4 available for the GA-P55M-UD2 where there used to be an F4n. The 'new' version has the same date though. Even odder, I downloaded and unpacked the BIOS files for the UD2. The contents of the files included:
from F4n: p55mud2.f4n dated 06-Nov-2009 4:37 AM
from F4: p55mud2.f4 dated 06-Nov-2009 12:56 AM

So the contents of F4n are more recent than F4. F4n is four hours newer than F4, but apparently F4 is meant to be the final version? I've been checking other forums for the past couple days but haven't found any info yet. I'm going to start a new thread and see if anyone else knows.


papatte said:
I will wait for 9.11 final version as 9.10 does not support officially HD5770.

Check AMD's website. They now have 9.11 available, dated yesterday.
http://support.amd.com/us/gpudownload/pages/index.aspx
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