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Bottlenecks

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August 22, 2009 3:26:45 PM

Recently i have had the urge to build my own pc, probably due to the surge of testosterone from replacing the gpu and hdd in my family pc. ^.^

Well i'm a true hardware noob, and do loads of extensive research before i actually start work.

So a processor needs a motherboard that can handle its processing capabilities. And motherboards come in different sizes-as such the case that i purchase has to be able to fit that type of motherboard right, or do cases fit all motherboards in general?

So here's the real issue, while looking at intel's website and looking through forums, i read about bottleneck issues.

Here's what i infered from my research, a GPU's memory clock has to match or be lower that the CPU's core speed to prevent bottleneck issues, am i right?

And in anycase is it amount of memory or memory technologies that can cause cpu memory bottleneck issues?

Thanks in advance for all the help, and the effort put into answering my question!

More about : bottlenecks

August 24, 2009 5:31:58 PM

No, the memory clock doesn't need to have any kind of ratio with the cpu. Th e only bottleneck is if you get a really powerful graphics card(s), say 2 gtx 295s in sli and put them in a system with a low end processor, like a Pentium 4. The processor can't get enough data to the gpu to fully utilize it. Clock speed doesn't matter as much as cpu architecture. However, you can increase the performance of your components by increasing the clock speed, which can help, i.e, overclock them.

Also, i don't think you need to worry about an mb not fitting in a case (you should check though), but some graphics cards might not fit.
August 25, 2009 1:56:49 PM

nonxcarbonx said:
No, the memory clock doesn't need to have any kind of ratio with the cpu. Th e only bottleneck is if you get a really powerful graphics card(s), say 2 gtx 295s in sli and put them in a system with a low end processor, like a Pentium 4. The processor can't get enough data to the gpu to fully utilize it. Clock speed doesn't matter as much as cpu architecture. However, you can increase the performance of your components by increasing the clock speed, which can help, i.e, overclock them.

Also, i don't think you need to worry about an mb not fitting in a case (you should check though), but some graphics cards might not fit.


Pretty much what he said.

No matter what you do you'll probably be bottlenecked somehow. The trick is to try to narrow the dispairity as much as possible. You don't by the top of the line processor and put it into a mobo and run it on integrated graphics just in the same way you wouldn't buy the most expensive graphics card and then plop a celeron CPU into the motherboard.

In gaming bottlenecking can be lessened by changing your settings. If you run at all low settings your CPU will be the bottleneck, if you run at all maxed out settings your graphics card will be the bottleneck. So what you do on the games you really like a lot is play around with the settings until you get a good compromise between physics elements (CPU intensive) and FPS (GPU intensive).

And always, match your hardware up. Use a mid-range graphics card with a mid-range CPU.


I hope that helps.
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
August 25, 2009 3:13:04 PM

What is the budget and what will be the primary purpose/s of the new PC?

Don't think so much of GPU speed but more on it's designed purpose - is it a mid-range or high-end gaming card? Once you decide how much gamng you'll be doing, pick the GPU then pick the CPU to match or balance the GPU.
!