Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

CPU is HOT!

Last response: in CPUs
Share
August 22, 2009 6:39:54 PM

Ok all,

I have a Q6600 with an arctic cooler 7 and this thing is still idling at 68C (according to Speedfan). I used arctic silver thermal paste and I have 2 other casefans to create airflow, but am not sure what else I can do without buying another fan. Is this a normal temp for an idle quad or does something need to be done. I noticed too that I can't really play games either since my GPU is also around 68C.

Any ideas? Thanks!

More about : cpu hot

August 22, 2009 6:41:56 PM

jrgleason2003 said:
Ok all,

I have a Q6600 with an arctic cooler 7 and this thing is still idling at 68C (according to Speedfan). I used arctic silver thermal paste and I have 2 other casefans to create airflow, but am not sure what else I can do without buying another fan. Is this a normal temp for an idle quad or does something need to be done. I noticed too that I can't really play games either since my GPU is also around 68C.

Any ideas? Thanks!



PS- here is my config

Q6600
8800gtx (evga)
4gig DDR2
Ocz 700W stealth xtreme
MSI P6N SLI Platinum
m
0
l
August 22, 2009 6:48:04 PM

That is hot for idle on the cpu (assuming it's at stock). Try reseating the heatsink and running with the the side of the case off. Be sure the cpu is not being overvolted. Post a cpuz screenshot. However, 68C idle temp for a 8800gtx is normal.
m
0
l
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
August 22, 2009 6:54:36 PM

how do I post a screen shot on here?
m
0
l
a c 172 à CPUs
August 22, 2009 7:09:56 PM

The only real way of being certain that a push pin type HSF is installed correctly is to do it before you install the motherboard in the case. That way, you can check the back of the motherboard.
m
0
l
a c 309 à CPUs
August 23, 2009 12:20:42 AM

Push pin coolers can be tricky to install.
A bad installation can lead to higher temperatures, and even cpu throttling.
With the pc powered down, gently rock the cooler to see if it is on solid, or if it wobbles a bit.
Push pin coolers are best installed while the motherboard is outside of the case.
You need to be able to look at the back of the board to verify that
all 4 pins are completely through and locked.
Play with the pins on the cooler first, so you can see exactly how they work.
Read the instructions that came with your retail cpu.
When pushing down on the pins, do a diagonal pair first.
If you don't, it is hard to get the last pin in.
Don't forget to clean the parts and reapply fresh thermal compound every time.
Don't try to reuse the TIM.
Rubbing alcohol is OK as a cleaner.
I use a paper coffee filter to clean with because it is lint free.
Any name brand TIM should be OK(as-5, Mx-2, etc.)
When applying the TIM, don't use too much, because it can act as an insulator.
Don't apply too little, either, because it won't spread and fill the microscopic
imperfections in the surfaces. A dollop about the size of a grain
of rice should be about right.

The 8800GTS/X sends much of the hot air directly out the double slot cooler. There are, however three slots in the card which lets some hot exhaust leak back into the case. This heats up both the vga card, and the cpu. I installed a cheap slot fan directly under those slits, and it reduced both my vga temps and my cpu temps:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 1:37:29 AM

Thanks for all the great advice. I did indeed install the CPU fan prior to installing the board. I am 100% confident that it is on snug and even. I did clean the CPU with rubbing alcohol, but never had these kinds of temps as a result of that. I wonder if the board has anything to do with it. I am not as worried about the GPU as I am the CPU. I wonder if a newer, bigger, better, more badass CPU fan is needed for my setup. I ran Assasins Creed and the CPU jumped to about 80C, I think under those temps, the PC will be too hot to run decent graphics and will shut down!
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 10:46:49 AM

I believe the 8800GTX would be the culprit for the overheat. It simply produces too much heat for your case to remove, and excess heat would increase the temperature of the air inside the case, which makes the CPU heatsink less effective.

So the best way for you to reduce temperature would be further increase the case flow (i.e. removing the side panel), purchase a better cooling solution for the GPU (such as Arctic Cooling's Accelero), or purchase a better cooling solution for the CPU.
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 11:49:58 AM

try coretemp or realtemp, I do not trust speedfan much.

Quote:
I did clean the CPU with rubbing alcohol, but never had these kinds of temps as a result of that.

I hope You applied new TIM after cleaning it?!

I have put Q6600 @3.2GHz and 1.375V with arctic cooling freezer 7 pro in friends PC and it idles 40-45C and full load 65-70C with room temp around 30 C these hot summer days. So something is wrong there.

Try touching CPU HSF, if it is hot then You have airflow problems in case, if it is not hot then HSF is mounted or TIM applied incorrectly.
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 11:53:27 AM

jrgleason2003 said:
Thanks for all the great advice. I did indeed install the CPU fan prior to installing the board. I am 100% confident that it is on snug and even. I did clean the CPU with rubbing alcohol, but never had these kinds of temps as a result of that. I wonder if the board has anything to do with it. I am not as worried about the GPU as I am the CPU. I wonder if a newer, bigger, better, more badass CPU fan is needed for my setup. I ran Assasins Creed and the CPU jumped to about 80C, I think under those temps, the PC will be too hot to run decent graphics and will shut down!


How are the fans in the case implemented? A good setup will have 1-2 front fans (usually in the lower part) that intake cool air and 1 fan at the higher back part blowing hot air outside the case. Some cases have another fan out-taking hot air above the case from the CPU and/or a lateral fan blowing cold air on the GPUs.

With a setup as this and a stock heatsink properly installed (don't use too much thermal paste) a Q6600 should not go above 40-45 degrees (celsium) on idle with an ambient temperature of about 20-25 degrees. I don't think the MoBo is the problem or you will have very hight NB temps, it's surely a case of bad airflow inside the case. Use CPUID Hardware Temps or Everest program to test all the temperatures inside the case and you will easily find if there's a problem of this type. If that's no the case (i.e. there's good airflow in the chassis) then you mounted badly the cooler or used too much paste or the plate of the cooler is not in plan and touch the CPU only in part. Recheck it all; you can see if the heatsink doesn't touch properly from how the paste spreads: if it is not homogenously spread in the CPU but for example is thicker on the sides you will have to be sure that it contact correctly with the CPU and in the case you will have to lap it.

Artic cooler 7 is fine but there are surely much better air heatsinks out there. That being said it is anyway much better of stock heatsink so your CPU temps are definetly too high.

EDIT: Didn't notice you had an aftermark cooler so edited the post accordingly
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 1:04:52 PM

selea said:
How are the fans in the case implemented? A good setup will have 1-2 front fans (usually in the lower part) that intake cool air and 1 fan at the higher back part blowing hot air outside the case. Some cases have another fan out-taking hot air above the case from the CPU and/or a lateral fan blowing cold air on the GPUs.

With a setup as this and a stock heatsink properly installed (don't use too much thermal paste) a Q6600 should not go above 40-45 degrees (celsium) on idle with an ambient temperature of about 20-25 degrees. I don't think the MoBo is the problem or you will have very hight NB temps, it's surely a case of bad airflow inside the case. Use CPUID Hardware Temps or Everest program to test all the temperatures inside the case and you will easily find if there's a problem of this type. If that's no the case (i.e. there's good airflow in the chassis) then you mounted badly the cooler or used too much paste or the plate of the cooler is not in plan and touch the CPU only in part. Recheck it all; you can see if the heatsink doesn't touch properly from how the paste spreads: if it is not homogenously spread in the CPU but for example is thicker on the sides you will have to be sure that it contact correctly with the CPU and in the case you will have to lap it.

Artic cooler 7 is fine but there are surely much better air heatsinks out there. That being said it is anyway much better of stock heatsink so your CPU temps are definetly too high.

EDIT: Didn't notice you had an aftermark cooler so edited the post accordingly



The heatsink is warm, but not hot. I am 100% positive the heatsink fan is seated properly. I have a front fan pulling in air (at bottom), and a rear fan pushing it out (along with the PSU fan). My problem is, is that I do not have anymore hookups for my fans unless I take the little heatsink fan off the pipes on my board. I was sure not to use too much paste and spread it out evenly on the chip. So could this possibly be the way my case is set up (its a cheesey generic one) or am I doing something wrong here?
m
0
l

Best solution

August 23, 2009 2:55:58 PM

jrgleason2003 said:
The heatsink is warm, but not hot. I am 100% positive the heatsink fan is seated properly. I have a front fan pulling in air (at bottom), and a rear fan pushing it out (along with the PSU fan). My problem is, is that I do not have anymore hookups for my fans unless I take the little heatsink fan off the pipes on my board. I was sure not to use too much paste and spread it out evenly on the chip. So could this possibly be the way my case is set up (its a cheesey generic one) or am I doing something wrong here?


It could be the case. Check the temperatures inside it with Everest or CPUID hardware monitor. You will find it out. Usually a good temperature inside the case is about 20-30 degrees depending on ambient temperature. The larger it is the more heat the CPU produces. Be sure to have all cables the more clean you can so not to stop airflow.

Also check if the paste is spreaded correctly on the CPU. It should cover all of it without being thinner in some parts of it. Also if you put it evenly when the heatsink makes contact with the CPU it can spread it badly if it is not lapped well. Have you still the stock cooler? If all else fails and you have it try with it and watch what happens. If you have lower temps you can be sure it's a cooler problem. As I've said a stocker cooler should produce about 40-45 degrees in idle so in that way you can see if something is wrong with the case or the CPU.

The fans you have what RPM they have and what CFM?

Share
August 23, 2009 3:13:21 PM

Any ideas what the problem may be? Thanks a ton so far!
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 3:13:47 PM

No, Catherine Zeta Jones is hot your cpu is nuclear,you better take that cooler off,clean repaste it, and start over lest you want to buy a new cpu
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 5:15:51 PM

jrgleason2003 said:
Here is the link to the monitoring stuff.

http://www.imagebam.com/image/27b80546425007


Your case is definetly too hot. You have 44 degress on the HDDs and the MoBo outside temp is too hot.

But this is not the bad part. Your MoBo is frying. Are you sure you didn't change the voltages? Try to reset everything there and check all jumpers with the manual. You risk on broking the board, seriously. No wonder your CPU is so high. It's not a problem of the heatsink it's a problem of the Motherboard and bad case airflow. The thing you must do immediately is to check all about the MoBo, seriously.

As for the fans those are 80mm ones. They do a lot of noise and don't move enough air. If your case allow you to do it change them with 120mm fans with 1200 or more RPMs.

Again, beware about your MoBo, I don't either know why you didn't fry it yet.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
August 23, 2009 5:26:04 PM

Try the reseating as others have said, but this time, don't spread out the AS5. Just leave it as the drop in the middle, and let the pressure of mounting the heatsink spread it out for you. It almost ALWAYS does a better job than manually spreading it out, especially for thin pastes.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
August 23, 2009 5:27:58 PM

in that screenshot is the cpu at idle? or load?
if its at idle, try reseating, if its at load, no worries
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 5:37:22 PM

xaira said:
in that screenshot is the cpu at idle? or load?
if its at idle, try reseating, if its at load, no worries


It's at idle, for this I was worried.
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 6:42:30 PM

Can we have BIOS temps for your mobo?
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 9:13:06 PM

selea said:
Your case is definetly too hot. You have 44 degress on the HDDs and the MoBo outside temp is too hot.

But this is not the bad part. Your MoBo is frying. Are you sure you didn't change the voltages? Try to reset everything there and check all jumpers with the manual. You risk on broking the board, seriously. No wonder your CPU is so high. It's not a problem of the heatsink it's a problem of the Motherboard and bad case airflow. The thing you must do immediately is to check all about the MoBo, seriously.

As for the fans those are 80mm ones. They do a lot of noise and don't move enough air. If your case allow you to do it change them with 120mm fans with 1200 or more RPMs.

Again, beware about your MoBo, I don't either know why you didn't fry it yet.




I didn't change anything on the mobo, everything is running at stock. What should I do about the mobo if that is too hot???
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 9:14:05 PM

smithereen said:
Can we have BIOS temps for your mobo?



How do I get the bios temps for the mobo? Just go into my bios and check them?
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 9:24:55 PM

Nevermind. Here is what my Bios is saying

CPU Temp: 66c
System Temp 38c

CPU Fan: 2870RPM
Sys Fan 1: 8000
Sys Fan 2: 2500

CPU Vcore: 1.248v
3.3v: 3.360v
5v: 5.045v
12v: 12.056v
5vSB: 5.068
m
0
l
August 23, 2009 10:57:38 PM

Ok, I took everything apart and reseated. Re-applied the thermal past (smaller amount). Switched the direction of my heatsink fan and left the side of my case off. My temps dropped quite a bit! (check it out....http://www.imagebam.com/image/937f7446469370) I really think that my case and weak airflow is the issue as it is really cramped in there (regular ATX case, not micro-atx). My question is should I get a full tower case, and get bigger fans, or simply buy better fans for my current case?

m
0
l
a c 309 à CPUs
August 23, 2009 11:38:34 PM

A decent case will have a 120mm output fan in the rear, and a 120mm intake fan in front. Anything less is not good. With a hot cpu and a hot vga card, you should have more.
What does yours look like?

I would recommend the Antec 300 as a good inexpensive case:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$59.95. Do some shopping for free delivery. Cases are heavy, and can cost $20 to ship.
The case comes with a 120mm rear fan and a 140mm top fan, both three speed, and they move lots of air. If that is not enough, you can install two 120mm intake fans in front. Yate loon fans are good and cheap for that. It is not the size of the case that is important, it is the straight through airflow. I am not enthusiastic about side intakes/fans. I think they disturb the natural front to back and low to high air flow.
m
0
l
August 24, 2009 12:44:54 AM

jrgleason2003 said:
Ok, I took everything apart and reseated. Re-applied the thermal past (smaller amount). Switched the direction of my heatsink fan and left the side of my case off. My temps dropped quite a bit! (check it out....http://www.imagebam.com/image/937f7446469370) I really think that my case and weak airflow is the issue as it is really cramped in there (regular ATX case, not micro-atx). My question is should I get a full tower case, and get bigger fans, or simply buy better fans for my current case?


If you specified what case you are using I missed it, but an example perhaps of what you should be able to achieve might be as follows, note temps were measured with Real Temp 2.6, not sure what the latest version is but this will give you an idea. My core temps at idle are 34 to35C, Q6600 clocked at 3.2GHz, system board Gigabyte P35-DS3R, 8GB, 6 int HD, 2 int optical drives, OCZ Vendetta 2 CPU cooler, 4850HD Toxic GPU, TX750 PS, etc. My case is an Antec 182 with 2 120mm Scythe fans, 1 120mm Scythe intake fan on the upper HD bay, and a 120mm Scythe fan on the CPU cooler. All cables are sleeved and routed for maximum airflow. Ambient air temp in office is 20C, air temp in case is 24C. Your voltages seem to be close to nominal, the primary culprit seems to be airflow in your case.
m
0
l
August 24, 2009 12:45:37 AM

jrgleason2003 said:
Ok, I took everything apart and reseated. Re-applied the thermal past (smaller amount). Switched the direction of my heatsink fan and left the side of my case off. My temps dropped quite a bit! (check it out....http://www.imagebam.com/image/937f7446469370) I really think that my case and weak airflow is the issue as it is really cramped in there (regular ATX case, not micro-atx). My question is should I get a full tower case, and get bigger fans, or simply buy better fans for my current case?


If you specified what case you are using I missed it, but an example perhaps of what you should be able to achieve might be as follows, note temps were measured with Real Temp 2.6, not sure what the latest version is but this will give you an idea. My core temps at idle are 34 to35C, Q6600 clocked at 3.2GHz, system board Gigabyte P35-DS3R, 8GB, 6 int HD, 2 int optical drives, OCZ Vendetta 2 CPU cooler, 4850HD Toxic GPU, TX750 PS, etc. My case is an Antec 182 with 2 120mm Scythe fans, 1 120mm Scythe intake fan on the upper HD bay, and a 120mm Scythe fan on the CPU cooler. All cables are sleeved and routed for maximum airflow. Ambient air temp in office is 20C, air temp in case is 24C. Your voltages seem to be close to nominal, the primary culprit seems to be airflow in your case.
m
0
l
August 24, 2009 1:06:28 AM

I am looking at all these cases. Where do all these fans get hooked up!? I mean some of these things come with 4-6 fans. My mobo only allows 3 (one of which is used by as a heatsink fan for the pipes on the mobo, so I really only can get 2! Lame!
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
August 24, 2009 2:36:12 AM

most fans that come with cases can be connected to 4 pin legacy connectors direct from the psu
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
August 24, 2009 2:37:16 AM

the fans will most likely connect directly to the psu using 4 pin legacy connectoers
m
0
l
August 24, 2009 4:20:25 AM

even though some may have 3
m
0
l
August 24, 2009 10:33:55 AM

jrgleason2003 said:
Ok, I took everything apart and reseated. Re-applied the thermal past (smaller amount). Switched the direction of my heatsink fan and left the side of my case off. My temps dropped quite a bit! (check it out....http://www.imagebam.com/image/937f7446469370) I really think that my case and weak airflow is the issue as it is really cramped in there (regular ATX case, not micro-atx). My question is should I get a full tower case, and get bigger fans, or simply buy better fans for my current case?


I am happy you were able to put temps down. As for your question you have two options: one is to change the two fans with 120x120x25mm fans (if you can have Scythe fans the better) at at least 1200 RPM, but this depends if your case let you do it. If it's out of the question then a good low cost case is the Antec 300 (at about 50$) that have a very good airflow when you install 1 or 2 of the optional front fans. The Antec 300 is spacy for a mini tower and has wires to clean cable settings. If you have some spare cash I will go for it.
m
0
l
August 24, 2009 12:53:08 PM

Let me ask you all this. Antec has a bottom mounted PSU. How does that bode for a power connection that is upper left? I fear that it wont be enough length to get over my video card and around all the other peripherals.
m
0
l
August 24, 2009 1:42:53 PM

jrgleason2003 said:
Let me ask you all this. Antec has a bottom mounted PSU. How does that bode for a power connection that is upper left? I fear that it wont be enough length to get over my video card and around all the other peripherals.


On the contrary is much better. The GPU is nearer the bottom and the power is near enough for the cables to reach it without problem. The pros of a bottom PSU (and in fact all major manufactures adopt this layout now) is that the layout of the cables is much better. The fans of the Antec 300 are powered by molex 4 pin that are prolonged to the bottom. I never had a problem with PSU in the bottom and I would never return to the other layout now that I've adopted this.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
August 24, 2009 2:11:29 PM

I have had some great airflow with my cheap coolermaster 330 elite case ($33CAD last spring). It came with one rear fan (which was weak) and I bought 4 new fans: 3 x120 and 1 x80. I have the 80 blowing on the CPU, a 120 intaking air at the front, a 120 exhausting out the back (replacing the stock) , and my last 120 exhausting from the side of the GPU. Some careful cable management, and I have been enjoying very awesomely cool temps. These days (with my apt usually at 20-25c ambient) my 710 x3 is idling at 24-26c and under prim95 load, hit a max of about 50c, OC'd to 3.1ghz. During gaming, I rarely break 42c. These are with stock HSF.
m
0
l
August 24, 2009 2:12:43 PM

Cool, my Ocz stealth xtreme should reach then.

I just bought the Antec 300 and purchased 2 more Rosewill 120mm blue led fans (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspxItem=N82E1683...). The fans are cheap, but I couldn't afford anything else. With 4 fans, I think that things should cool down nicely. I'll post temps after everything arrives and is hooked up.
m
0
l
August 25, 2009 2:48:22 AM

jrgleason2003 said:
Ok, I took everything apart and reseated. Re-applied the thermal past (smaller amount). Switched the direction of my heatsink fan and left the side of my case off. My temps dropped quite a bit! (check it out....http://www.imagebam.com/image/937f7446469370) I really think that my case and weak airflow is the issue as it is really cramped in there (regular ATX case, not micro-atx). My question is should I get a full tower case, and get bigger fans, or simply buy better fans for my current case?


If you specified what case you are using I missed it, but an example perhaps of what you should be able to achieve might be as follows, note temps were measured with Real Temp 2.6, not sure what the latest version is but this will give you an idea. My core temps at idle are 34 to35C, Q6600 clocked at 3.2GHz, system board Gigabyte P35-DS3R, 8GB, 6 int HD, 2 int optical drives, OCZ Vendetta 2 CPU cooler, 4850HD Toxic GPU, TX750 PS, etc. My case is an Antec 182 with 2 120mm Scythe fans, 1 120mm Scythe intake fan on the upper HD bay, and a 120mm Scythe fan on the CPU cooler. All cables are sleeved and routed for maximum airflow. Ambient air temp in office is 20C, air temp in case is 24C. Your voltages seem to be close to nominal, the primary culprit seems to be airflow in your case.
m
0
l
August 30, 2009 12:04:50 AM

Great news! I got the Antec 300 and 3 extra 120mm fans. My PC is idling around 40c and hits about 55c under load. My hdd is at 25c and my GPU is at 50c at idle. Of course, when I play games the GPU gets hotter (around 68c) but that's to be expected. Overall I am thrilled I saved my gear and got a pretty nice case as well. Although I still found it hard to hide all my cables in the provided space, it definitely helped with airflow. Bottom line was I simply needed a newer case that had more fans! Thanks for the tips all, it is greatly appreciated!
m
0
l
!