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Best Future Proof: LGA 1156 vs LGA 1366

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August 23, 2009 3:51:12 PM

Trying to figure out what CPU to base a new computer around: uses will include heavy statistical analysis (Stata), gaming, and general internet surfing/Office/etc.

Which socket is more likely to offer better upgrade opportunities in 2-3 years: 1156 or 1366? Or will the technology advance so much that a new motherboard will be needed, in which case I probably be better buying the best performance value right now (probably an AMD)?

Thanks.
August 23, 2009 3:52:24 PM

1366 by far has the best upgrade path, since you have hexa-cores and octo cores.
August 23, 2009 4:18:14 PM

But is it likely that a motherboard that I could buy today would be able to support 6 or 8 cores in 2-3 years?
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August 23, 2009 4:53:12 PM

I have been trying to figure out the answer as well. i7 920 on 1366 or i5-i7 on 1156. Sandy bridge will be out in a year or 2 an know one really knows what socket its going to use and how long each socket is going to last. This is the info ive gathered so far

1366 peformance is better than 1156 especially if using multi gpu

It seems like you should get a i7 920 if
you know how to overclock it
multi gpu
Live near a microcenter and get an 1366 rig for about the same as a cheaper 1156



get and 1156 reasons
Dont live near a microcenter then basic i5/i7 1156 rig can wind up cheaper
Dont know how to overclock in which case the higher turbo mode will give you a little more performance for a cheaper price
lower power consumption
Also isnt the gulftown going to be really expensive

Im not an expert so this is info im getting from different forum threads. if ive stated anything wrong please let me know. The more opinions the better.

Probably both will be around even though 1156 is newer. For me i may go with 1156
August 23, 2009 5:29:25 PM

walt526 said:
Trying to figure out what CPU to base a new computer around: uses will include heavy statistical analysis (Stata), gaming, and general internet surfing/Office/etc.

Which socket is more likely to offer better upgrade opportunities in 2-3 years: 1156 or 1366? Or will the technology advance so much that a new motherboard will be needed, in which case I probably be better buying the best performance value right now (probably an AMD)?

Thanks.


It depends on what you want. Both are future proof the same exact way, only they are intended for different ranges. The 1366 is for high-end, the 1156 is for mainstream. So as you see it depends how much you would like to spend in future for upgrades and the type of upgrades you are going to use.

For example: Multi-GPU and Tri-Channel RAM integrated - 1366, single CPU and double channel RAM not integrated -1156. Best of the best 1366, best of mainstream (at last on paper for now) 1156.
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August 23, 2009 5:31:54 PM

If I m not wrong then we guys normally upgrade mobo whenever we upgrade CPU.

So we should not worry about the kind of slot will be used by future processors or not.

We don't generally switch 2-3 CPU on a same mobo.


August 23, 2009 5:43:04 PM

shubham1401 said:
If I m not wrong then we guys normally upgrade mobo whenever we upgrade CPU.

So we should not worry about the kind of slot will be used by future processors or not.

We don't generally switch 2-3 CPU on a same mobo.


Usually it's so but there are some people that change only the CPU. A friend of mine for example. Also this depends on the "sector" you are situated within. Mainstream usually tends to change at last a CPU before the technology of the MoBo becomes obsolete and 2-3 GPUs.
August 23, 2009 5:58:45 PM

selea said:
It depends on what you want. Both are future proof the same exact way, only they are intended for different ranges. The 1366 is for high-end, the 1156 is for mainstream. So as you see it depends how much you would like to spend in future for upgrades and the type of upgrades you are going to use.

For example: Multi-GPU and Tri-Channel RAM integrated - 1366, single CPU and double channel RAM not integrated -1156. Best of the best 1366, best of mainstream (at last on paper for now) 1156.


Dual channel RAM is integrated on 1156.
August 23, 2009 9:08:29 PM

I intended to say that 1556 replace the high bandwidth QPI link with Intel’s slower DMI and I used the word "integrated". I thought if the reader knew what I was saying he would get the meaning. However it was not clear and literally wrong, I admit, but I'm too lazy to explain everything plainly ;-)
August 23, 2009 9:25:44 PM

Actually, if you look at a block diagram, the QPI is on 1156, too, just on-package or on-die. DMI is on the 1366 platform as well, between the northbridge and southbridge, and since northbridge is completely subsumed by the 1156 products, it's totally a wash.

In reality, the only things missing on 1156 that are present on 1366 is an extra x16 channels of PCIe off the northbridge and the extra DDR3 channel.
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August 23, 2009 11:42:00 PM

Helloworld_98 said:
1366 by far has the best upgrade path, since you have hexa-cores and octo cores.

Agreed; BUT it depends on IF OP will be using programs that will benefit from 6-8 cores + HT.
August 24, 2009 10:42:39 AM

archibael said:
Actually, if you look at a block diagram, the QPI is on 1156, too, just on-package or on-die. DMI is on the 1366 platform as well, between the northbridge and southbridge, and since northbridge is completely subsumed by the 1156 products, it's totally a wash.

In reality, the only things missing on 1156 that are present on 1366 is an extra x16 channels of PCIe off the northbridge and the extra DDR3 channel.


You have explained better what I was meaning. Your words "just on-package or on-die" was what I was talking about. The DMI is also on the 1366 platform but the bandwith of the two system is different just for the adoption of the it. Intel’s QPI is a very fast bus delivering up to 25.6GB/s of bandwidth while Intel’s DMI is the link used between the X58 chipset and the ICH10 I/O controller, it’s a much more conservative bus capable of delivering 2 - 4GB/s of bandwidth. So the difference comes on the adoption of the QPI and DMI on the sockets. 1366 gives you the total bandwith of QPI, 1156 reach only the bandwith of DMI.

If you’ve got a multi-socket system (e.g. dual processor Xeon workstation, or Skulltrail successor) or if you’ve got a lot of high bandwidth PCIe devices (e.g. multi-GPU or lots of Larrabees) then QPI makes a whole lot of sense. However, if you’ve got a single socket system and aren’t running a lot of high bandwidth PCIe devices then QPI is overkill. This is what I was trying to saying in little words.

The differences for a typical user with 1 GPU (or two mainstreams ones) between 1366 and 1156 are about none, but if you intend on going on more high-end setups then the two system comes more apart than just PCI-E lanes.
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August 24, 2009 12:14:16 PM

no such thing as future proof
August 24, 2009 3:00:58 PM

selea said:
You have explained better what I was meaning. Your words "just on-package or on-die" was what I was talking about. The DMI is also on the 1366 platform but the bandwith of the two system is different just for the adoption of the it. Intel’s QPI is a very fast bus delivering up to 25.6GB/s of bandwidth while Intel’s DMI is the link used between the X58 chipset and the ICH10 I/O controller, it’s a much more conservative bus capable of delivering 2 - 4GB/s of bandwidth. So the difference comes on the adoption of the QPI and DMI on the sockets. 1366 gives you the total bandwith of QPI, 1156 reach only the bandwith of DMI.


I guess I'm not understanding exactly where you're coming from, but that's okay. You seem to be reaching the same conclusion. :) 

FYI, from a diagram perspective, 1366 is

CPU
|
| QPI
|
V
X58 (Northbridge) ---> PCIe ( 2 x 16), DDR3 (three channels)
|
| DMI
|
V
ICH10


and 1156 is

CPU
|
| QPI
|
V
MCH (Northbridge) ---> PCIe ( 1 x 16), DDR3 (two channels)
|
| DMI
|
V
PCH


The only difference is that on 1156 the CPU and Northbridge are all on the same die or package. Yes, it means DMI is the only "customer visible" interface on 1156... but that's because it's a two chip solution instead of three chip. Makes for cheaper motherboards in the long run, but unless you're trying to do multi-socket (as you point out below), doesn't change the architecture.


Quote:

If you’ve got a multi-socket system (e.g. dual processor Xeon workstation, or Skulltrail successor) or if you’ve got a lot of high bandwidth PCIe devices (e.g. multi-GPU or lots of Larrabees) then QPI makes a whole lot of sense. However, if you’ve got a single socket system and aren’t running a lot of high bandwidth PCIe devices then QPI is overkill. This is what I was trying to saying in little words.

The differences for a typical user with 1 GPU (or two mainstreams ones) between 1366 and 1156 are about none, but if you intend on going on more high-end setups then the two system comes more apart than just PCI-E lanes.


Agreed on that. Sorry to be so pedantic-- I just see the "1366 has QPI, 1156 only has DMI" thing so often and people seem to be drawing the wrong conclusion for what this means in the real world (not saying you did).
August 24, 2009 7:15:32 PM

archibael said:


Agreed on that. Sorry to be so pedantic-- I just see the "1366 has QPI, 1156 only has DMI" thing so often and people seem to be drawing the wrong conclusion for what this means in the real world (not saying you did).


I know what you mean and in fact I acknowledged the fact that I was literally wrong on my assesment, however I was too lazy to write in full what I meant and I thought a simplifed word would have sufficed. Naturally I shouldn't have do that and I was rigthly corrected by you for that. I know that sometimes I'm really too lazy and I often fall in these sorts of problems. The non native language then doesn't help matters more ;-)

Anyway at last now more people know exactly how things works :-)
September 12, 2009 3:57:08 AM

I've been researching all week to find out whether or not the i5 or i7 1156 CPU is actually better than the i7 1366 CPU. My research lead me to believe that the i7 1366 is better than the i7 or 15 1156 CPU. I'm not a "Tech" but based on most of the Mobo specification seen for the 1366 and the 1156, i've concluded that the 1366 supports tripple channel, while the 1156 supports dual channel. I don't know about the PCI-e channel. Can you direct me to any information that may enhance my understanding on this.

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September 12, 2009 4:03:51 AM

walt526 said:
But is it likely that a motherboard that I could buy today would be able to support 6 or 8 cores in 2-3 years?

No, probably not 8. 6 cores are likely but I doubt 8 will work.
September 18, 2009 7:03:39 PM

Actually, 6 and 8 core proc announcements are due out by the end of this year and Intel has already stated they'll use 1366 socket.

And I do independently upgrade my CPUs from my Mobo.
September 18, 2009 8:18:16 PM

^ where did intel state that 8-core proc. will support socket 1366?
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September 20, 2009 6:12:29 AM

Being able to fit into LGA1366 means absolutely nothing about how future proof current motherboards are. Put a Q9550 into an early LGA775 board and see what happens.
a b à CPUs
September 20, 2009 2:01:20 PM

edit:
Damn it! Who brought up the dead
March 19, 2010 6:13:11 PM

BTW, thank you to both selea and archibael for your edifying exchange on these two "architectures" (from someone who lacks the detailed education in computer hardware design, but appreciates knowing as much as possible for making future decisions).
March 19, 2010 7:43:13 PM

Actually, the embarassingly dumb thing is I misled you a bit with my diagram. It's actually

FYI, from a diagram perspective, 1366 is

CPU --> DDR3 (three channels)
|
| QPI
|
V
X58 (Northbridge) ---> PCIe ( 2 x 16)
|
| DMI
|
V
ICH10


and 1156 is

CPU
|
| QPI
|
V
MCH (Northbridge) ---> PCIe ( 1 x 16), DDR3 (two channels)
|
| DMI
|
V
PCH


I need to lay off the crack.
March 24, 2010 10:37:59 AM

randomizer said:
Being able to fit into LGA1366 means absolutely nothing about how future proof current motherboards are. Put a Q9550 into an early LGA775 board and see what happens.


Just curious. What happens?
April 4, 2010 4:58:29 AM

Coming in late here, but right now I'm in the same situation, go 1156 or 1366? The prices now seem very close especially at i7 930, i7 860. Can I add more than 4 gig RAM to 1156?
April 4, 2010 7:59:22 AM

If you are going to upgrade your CPU quite frequently, then 1366 is going to be a better choice, but if you are upgrading like every 3-4 years, then it won't matter because you will swap motherboard along with CPU anyways.
April 4, 2010 8:48:48 AM

thanks JJLD
June 3, 2010 12:57:52 AM

1366 takes much better advantage of multi-GPUs. If you don't plan on utilizing a multi-GPU and triple channel Memory, there is little reason to go 1366.

Unless, of course, you live near a Microcenter and can get the 1366 for nearly the same price as a 1156.
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June 3, 2010 1:07:02 AM

hail666 said:
Coming in late here, but right now I'm in the same situation, go 1156 or 1366? The prices now seem very close especially at i7 930, i7 860. Can I add more than 4 gig RAM to 1156?


Should support a max of 16Gb of ram if you go with a 4x4Gb set up, although that would be insanely expensive. 4x2Gb would be much more economical.
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July 6, 2010 10:41:12 PM

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