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Help on RAM timings etc

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March 27, 2011 8:52:12 PM

I see that having lower RAM timings is better for gaming, I was just wondering how much of a performance increase does cas 7 have over cas 9 in gaming?

Its because I am buying my computer from PC specialist but they only stock this RAM http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... which is a cas 9, I would much prefer to buy one of these http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... with cas 7 latency.

If anyone could link any sites with performance tests on the different latencies in game, it would be much appreciated.

Also say I do get the cas 9 can i change the timings on it to be a lot faster or is it locked? (I am a complete nab at BIOS etc)

Regards Josh.

More about : ram timings

a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
March 27, 2011 9:27:25 PM

Having more expensive low-latency RAM doesn't give you noticeable performance increases in games or other applications. The difference is a couple of percentage points, which is below the threshold for us humans to actually notice. You may notice the difference in synthetic benchmark scores, but it doesn't actually translate to better gaming. Save your money for something that'll actually help performance, like a better graphics card.
March 27, 2011 9:29:17 PM

K cheers man, don't worry got 2 gtx 570's in sli my GPU is pimpin XD
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March 27, 2011 9:33:05 PM

Pretty much what was said above if your bench racing you will see the numbers difference but for real world apps not so much of a difference. Thats why you see people post that 2000mhz mem is sort of a waste for anything but bench marks over 1600
memory.Money can be used for other things.
March 27, 2011 10:55:52 PM

Yeah was keeping my clock at 1600, k cheers guys ill just keep with the cas 9.
a b } Memory
a c 219 4 Gaming
a c 151 K Overclocking
March 28, 2011 3:55:39 PM

Depends on what you are doing. Jumping fro CAS9 to CAS 7 on a $1,000 system is hard to justify. On a $2,000 system, for many users, it's pretty much an automatic. Any argument you use to get 8GB of RAM instead of 4 GB should be one at least considered for lowering CAS. This is especially true when the cost difference is minimal.

Back in December, you could buy CAS 7 sets for the same price as CAS 9 so it was a no brainer. We have not seen that difference close as yet in the dual module sets. Perhaps in a few months when the faster stuff is in greater supply, we will see some pricing pressure applied in this regard.

You will also see it oft recommended to get 2 x 4G instead of 4 x 2GB with the justification being that with 4 modules, you might have to lower CAS to get a stable OC. Well if CAS doesn't matter, then why the concern ?

If you are number crunching, using large databases, using CAD, 3D rendering etc, CAS is very significant. It's hard to make a wholesale judgement for gaming as games behave differently which we know from seeing some being CPU constrained and others GFX solely dependent.

Gaming is a mixed bag. My son for example is a pilot and he notices that Flight Simulator for example likes low latency RAM. In instances where you have done like THG suggests to get the advantage of that extra 4 GB of RAM, and you are using it for your swap file, then loading scenes will benefit from the lower wait between each instruction.

Adding $50 for to a $2k system is an increase of 2.5 %. If you can see even half of that improvement in performance, is it a worthwhile investment. You'll see the same diminishing returns upgrading to the next fastest CPU, next fastest GFX card, etc.

One thing you can take advantage of if you read a lot of articles is that quite often you can find CAS 9 modules that will run just fine at CAS 8 or even CAS 7. This seems to be getting less and less likely to find of late.
March 28, 2011 5:52:06 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
Depends on what you are doing. Jumping fro CAS9 to CAS 7 on a $1,000 system is hard to justify. On a $2,000 system, for many users, it's pretty much an automatic. Any argument you use to get 8GB of RAM instead of 4 GB should be one at least considered for lowering CAS. This is especially true when the cost difference is minimal.

Back in December, you could buy CAS 7 sets for the same price as CAS 9 so it was a no brainer. We have not seen that difference close as yet in the dual module sets. Perhaps in a few months when the faster stuff is in greater supply, we will see some pricing pressure applied in this regard.

You will also see it oft recommended to get 2 x 4G instead of 4 x 2GB with the justification being that with 4 modules, you might have to lower CAS to get a stable OC. Well if CAS doesn't matter, then why the concern ?

If you are number crunching, using large databases, using CAD, 3D rendering etc, CAS is very significant. It's hard to make a wholesale judgement for gaming as games behave differently which we know from seeing some being CPU constrained and others GFX solely dependent.

Gaming is a mixed bag. My son for example is a pilot and he notices that Flight Simulator for example likes low latency RAM. In instances where you have done like THG suggests to get the advantage of that extra 4 GB of RAM, and you are using it for your swap file, then loading scenes will benefit from the lower wait between each instruction.

Adding $50 for to a $2k system is an increase of 2.5 %. If you can see even half of that improvement in performance, is it a worthwhile investment. You'll see the same diminishing returns upgrading to the next fastest CPU, next fastest GFX card, etc.

One thing you can take advantage of if you read a lot of articles is that quite often you can find CAS 9 modules that will run just fine at CAS 8 or even CAS 7. This seems to be getting less and less likely to find of late.


My systeM is around £1800 ($2800), but if i could run the cas 9 at cas 8 then i may as well just stick with what i have... I will just wait for the prices to fall a bit, even if they are not much different atm.
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
March 28, 2011 11:43:19 PM

I just set my ram from 9-9-9-30-2T @1600MHz ----> 7-9-8-24-1T@1600 MHz @1.6 volts.... It makes for a slightly more responsive system at least in my case it did..So I got CAS 7 RAM for the price of CAS 9....So its possible to adjust it and it not cost you a dime...
March 29, 2011 7:14:24 AM

Nice memory glad the timings worked out so well some companys seem to use better mem than others,(the chips themselves.)
March 29, 2011 8:48:26 AM

lowjack989 said:
The G.Skill Sniper series is the ones I am using got em for $100.00 at the egg 2x4GB 1600MHz..I actually got the timings from a review of them on newegg..check the reviews to find the timings heres the link:



http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Had a look at the reviews and saw the comment

2 Kits of 2 x 4GB = 16GB Total
P8P67 Pro / 2600K

1600Mhz - 7-9-8-24 1T @ 1.60v

So, with all 4 sticks populated, we were able to achieve both CAS7 and 1T fully stable. I'm keeping these sets for my system. =D

My system is flying now - 24/7 5.0Ghz 2600k w/ 16GB CAS7 1600 1T... 20-Pass LinX / Prime95 Blend/LargeFFT Passed. Life is good.

Wouldn't mind gettin these but im stuck with the damn kingston atm, when i upgrade them i will get some like these. Btw can you put 2 different brands with the same spec in the slots?
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
March 29, 2011 2:00:40 PM

Yes different brands work together....just make sure to match speed and latency.
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2011 4:04:35 AM

Correction: They MAY work together. There isn't any guarantee, and the only way to find out is to buy the new set and try them together.
May 16, 2011 9:30:50 AM

It is always preferable that the RAM has better momory space and works in good co-ordination.
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