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Overclocking Advatange in Dis-Advantage

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May 20, 2009 4:58:54 PM

I’m really new to PC building. Now like watercooling, overclocking is not for hobbyist anymore. Every one can do it because the tools and facilities are available. I’ve been reading a lot of forums since I’ve started thinking of building my very first Custom built PC. From this, all I see is overclocking. From CPU to memory to GPU (I wish I could overclock my girlfriend… Just Kidding). Honestly, I’m trying to convince myself why this is a good choice compare to just buying the highest specs. Again, I don’t want to offend anybody. I really just want to ask peoples opinion. Aside from saving and getting your money’s worth, what other benefits can you get from overclocking. The way I look at it (IMHO), when you overclocked you will inflict more heat, more power consumption, more risk of damaging hardware, and sometimes system instability. On some forums people will say “get the 920 its better than 965” other other hand same people will say “if I get a 965 for free or less I’ll take it”. Is it really all about money? I know it’s a user preference. But I’m wondering, how many people in most of these forums tell other people “Get this because this is the right thing” and not “Get this because I envy you for having a more highest spec than I have”. This may sound a little bit harsh but I came from a culture where this always happens (crab mentality). So please excuse me for being ignorant. I guess just I’m paranoid. So if you are going to build a new PC and money is not an object, would you still choose to overclock?
May 20, 2009 5:15:28 PM

^ Of course I would, If I could since most dual socket, or octo socket for that matter, don't have OC facilities but if I could then yes I would OC, because there is always more performance that you can get.
May 20, 2009 8:24:57 PM

This is weird I was about to ask this question. Spot on PC_Plum

Helloworld_98 how about if you are going to build a new PC will you get the highest specs or will you get the one that will OC like 920. I guess it's really about the budget. right?

PC_Plum about people in the forum. I guess most of them really try to help. but your best bet is to see the system yourself and test it to know the difference. The thing with benchmarks there's a lot of things to consider specially components.
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May 21, 2009 1:19:28 AM

even if i had ALL the best hardware i'd still overclock.... ALWAYS more speed to gain. only really high overclocks are likely to cause damage. the 920 is better bang for buck is what people are saying. nobody (cept for rich ppl) want to spend an ENTIRE pc budget on noe part. IMO
May 21, 2009 7:30:39 AM

PC_Plum are you from the Philippines? I was. From our culture, people with "bragging rights" is always look at highly in our society. Which maybe wrong but still exist. From Cell Phone, to cars, to people going to restaurants, or starbucks. Eventhough I don't live there anymore. Sometimes the culture you have grew up on still retains. I'm not rich but I still want the best. I'm the type of person that if I want something I wait till I get what I want. It may take longer but even on a short period of time you will feel satisfied that you have achieve something. Like many other people I don't buy new stuff as when they launch. I guess what I'm trying to say is that be yourself. I guess forums like this just help you to guide not convince you to decide. At the end of the day, they are not the one who's going to pay for it. It's you.
a b K Overclocking
May 21, 2009 5:42:33 PM

Some people want the best, but don't want to pay for it, others just want the best ... then some more. There are all kinds of people.

For myself, I always buy a system that will fit me at stock speeds, I see OCability as an upgrade path, much like SLI (or EVGA's step-up program). I run my system at stock speed for a while, then if I want to "keep up" with the more demanding stuff I OC as much as I want/can; this way I prolong the usable life of my system.

For example, I have been running my E8400 @ 3.0GHz for the past year and I just OCed it to 3.6GHz. Might try to push it more when I have the time and/or am willing to make the effort (reached 3.6GHz only by changing FSB, no other setting).
May 21, 2009 6:34:25 PM

Zenthar said:
Some people want the best, but don't want to pay for it, others just want the best ... then some more. There are all kinds of people.

For myself, I always buy a system that will fit me at stock speeds, I see OCability as an upgrade path, much like SLI (or EVGA's step-up program). I run my system at stock speed for a while, then if I want to "keep up" with the more demanding stuff I OC as much as I want/can; this way I prolong the usable life of my system.

For example, I have been running my E8400 @ 3.0GHz for the past year and I just OCed it to 3.6GHz. Might try to push it more when I have the time and/or am willing to make the effort (reached 3.6GHz only by changing FSB, no other setting).


I like your answer Zenthar. Because this is also what I'm planning to do. Honestly, The only reason why I was thinking of getting i.e. 965 because I feel like my next build will be 6-7 years time. It may sound redicolous but this is true.
a b K Overclocking
May 21, 2009 6:39:00 PM

PC_Plum said:
I like your answer Zenthar. Because this is also what I'm planning to do. Honestly, The only reason why I was thinking of getting i.e. 965 because I feel like my next build will be 6-7 years time. It may sound redicolous but this is true.
I also think it is better to invest half the money twice as often that the opposite; for example, your computing experience will probably be better if you spend 1500$ now and another 1500$ in 3 years than spending 3000$ now. Of course this is a simplified case because many components can be carried-over like casing, monitor, ...
a b B Homebuilt system
a b K Overclocking
May 21, 2009 9:00:44 PM

I think the i7 920 vs 965 argument comes down to common sense. It's not really about the money, it's just about being smart. The 920 and the 965 both have pretty much the same overclocking limit of 4GHz - 4.4GHz. If I can spend $280 and have the same overclocking limit as the $1,000 CPU, why would I ever waste $720? The only difference at that point is the i7 965 sticker on the front of your machine. If that sticker is worth $720 to you, that's fine.

I'll always overclock my components to a safe level. As long as the temps and voltage are low your components will last a very long time. I've never burned up a component by overclocking because I research the component's limits and make sure I stay on the safe side.
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