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First-time OC'er. Auto settings possibly dangerous?

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March 29, 2011 6:38:21 AM

Hi, I have a Phenom II 955 with a ASUS M4A77T+GSKILL 2x2GB, and right now I'm pretty sure I've arrived at a modest stable overclock @ 1.4v (often staying at 1.33v in reality with a max of 1.39v), a x19 multiplier sitting @ 3.8ghz. I'm approaching 1 hour of running prime95's blend test on top of testing 3dmark 06 and 3dmark 11.

I left EVERYTHING in the bios on auto except:

RAM Voltage
RAM Speed (1600MHz)
Timings @ rated (9-9-9-24-2T)
VCORE Voltage
Multiplier

Reading in other places made me uneasy so I'd like to double check, do I need to move anything from auto? Am I at risk of any of my motherboard voltages that are on auto, acting strangely in response to my OC'ing?

Thanks in advance!

*P.S.
Something weird seems to be happening. When I'm running Prime95 voltage runs at 1.33 or so but then now that I just stopped it (2.5 hours seems to be fine for me), its drawing 1.36-1.38v. More when its not under load?
a b À AMD
a b K Overclocking
March 29, 2011 10:33:02 AM

Don't worry about it (but keep an eye on your temps). The voltage fluctuations come standard on Asus AM3 :lol:  I don't think you need to tinker with your RAMS (except to set stock speed, voltage & timings if any is an issue).

You may work it out (and possibly eliminate it completely) using a combination of VDD and LLC, but the bottom line is you are effectively running 3.8GHz at 1.3875v.

Should be quite snappy [:jaydeejohn:5]

To give your memory subsystem a boost raise your NB/IMC multiplier from 10 to 12 (could probably go '13' or more but may take 1.2v or so on the NB volts). 2400MHz (12x200MHz) will give you a nice start and should keep you at stock NB volts if you are so inclined.

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March 29, 2011 4:15:55 PM

Disable

1- Turbo Core
2- Cool'n'quiet
3- C1E
4- PCIE Spread spectrum

Run Prime95 overnight or 24 hours.
Watch your temperatures. Do not go over 70ºC. CoreTemp for monitoring them.


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March 29, 2011 5:02:09 PM

Wisecracker said:
Don't worry about it (but keep an eye on your temps). The voltage fluctuations come standard on Asus AM3 :lol:  I don't think you need to tinker with your RAMS (except to set stock speed, voltage & timings if any is an issue).

You may work it out (and possibly eliminate it completely) using a combination of VDD and LLC, but the bottom line is you are effectively running 3.8GHz at 1.3875v.

Should be quite snappy [:jaydeejohn:5]

To give your memory subsystem a boost raise your NB/IMC multiplier from 10 to 12 (could probably go '13' or more but may take 1.2v or so on the NB volts). 2400MHz (12x200MHz) will give you a nice start and should keep you at stock NB volts if you are so inclined.



I'm not familiar with the terms, VDD or LLC. Could you quickly tell me what they are?

And your last part about memory went over my head. Only thing I recognized was NorthBridge multiplier :na: 
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Best solution

a b À AMD
a b K Overclocking
March 29, 2011 10:41:21 PM

VDD and LLC control processor over-voltage and voltage drops (vdroop).

And that NB multiplier is all you have to recognize :D 

For each 10% increase in the IMC/NB speed over stock 2000MHz, memory bandwidth is increased 3-4% and latency is reduced 3-4%. 2400MHz ('12x') is a 'slam dunk' at stock volts for the most part. 'Enthusiasts' have zoomed past 3000MHz IMC/NB. I hang around at 2500-2600MHz IMC/NB with 1.1875v to 1.2v.

Generally, from a performance standpoint you will achieve quite a boost in memory intensive applications. If you are gaming, it essentially will double your gain from over-clocking Example: if you gained 6-7FPS from 3.2GHz to 3.8GHz, with a crank of the IMC/NB you may well see an overall gain of 12-14FPS.

I wouldn't crank past 60c and prefer the low fifties at load.

3.8GHz at 1.3875v sounds about right. You may be able to go 1.375v and shave off a few degrees if you wish to 'cool' it a bit.
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March 30, 2011 3:02:31 AM

How do I know how far I should raise my NB speed for my memory so that it makes use of my overclock?

Thanks a lot for your info so far, I find it very helpful.
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March 30, 2011 4:28:37 AM



The voltage is really low. Idle its higher, when its under stress the voltage drops to 1.33v. Normal? i'm gonna keep upping it... haha

***SOLVED:
incase anyone else reads this
http://www.anandtech.com/show/2404/5

It is normal. By holding higher idle voltage, it can safely anticipate a raise in voltage so it doesn't:
---start low @ idle, then when it needs more, it will spike as it tries to go from low to high. it'll just drop the high voltage a little bit. kind of odd.
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March 30, 2011 5:05:29 PM

Best answer selected by Flashfir.
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March 31, 2011 10:21:22 PM

Just wondering, I lowered my OC a little so I can enable Cool & Quiet.

Are voltage fluctuations from 0.99v --> 1.38v (safely within operating specs) bad for my processor? Probably not but just wondering.

And I was wondering when I do overclock the FSB or the multiplier how do I make the most use of it by modifying my memory to match that speed? I have it running at 1600 & CL9 timings and my NB @ 2400mhz. Is there some sort of ratio?

Gskill: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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April 1, 2011 6:37:34 PM

Sorry to hi-jack the thread a little but I have a question along these same lines. If I change my nb to 2400, should i leave the nb voltage on auto?
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a b À AMD
a b K Overclocking
April 1, 2011 8:14:31 PM

:ouimaitre: 

Don't give me the reward -- you deserve all the credit. That's as good a job as you will find among enthusiasts. At 3.9GHz+ and 1.325v you have a golden 955BE, fer sure.

Your processor was constructed to utilize that volt range - and you have taken advantage of it. Excellent!

As far as utilizing the 'system clock' it's rather simple math. With DDR3 1600 your sweet spot is 240MHz. At stock, your memory is running 8(.)00 x 200MHz.

If you drop the memory ratio from 1600/800 to 1333/667 and raise the system clock to 240MHz: 6(.)67 x 240MHz will return your RAMs to stock spec.

You may then experiment with the CPU multiplier. With C&Q enabled you will be 4x240MHz at the lower end of the volt spectrum - the upper end is at your discretion dependent upon the volts you wish to crank. From the looks of your efforts so far, you should have a great deal of fun experimenting.

14x240MHz should be a slam dunk at reduced top-end volts (and this essentially will drop the lower-end volts, too) -- even 15x240MHz at reduced volts would appear to be within your reach. 16x240 at 1.35v (or less!) would appear to be a possibility.

Unless things have changed, raising the CPU multi above stock on BE processors will 'bork' C&Q again. There are third-party utilities available to work around this.

When you raise the system clock to 240MHz, don't forget to drop your NB multi back to '10' (10x240MHz = 2400MHz, right?) When you find your sweet spot with the CPU, you may return to the IMC/NB for further tweaking if you wish.

Also, little benefit is gained from cranking the HT beyond 2000MHz or so --- adjust your multi to keep it in that range for greatest stability.

Quote:
And I was wondering when I do overclock the FSB or the multiplier how do I make the most use of it by modifying my memory to match that speed? I have it running at 1600 & CL9 timings and my NB @ 2400mhz. Is there some sort of ratio?


Save your RAMs tweaking for last. Except for 'bragging rights' and synthetics this will be the most danger to your system stability. Concentrate on your CPU & IMC/NB speeds and voltages, and when you are ready travel on over to the AMD section of Xtreme Systems and check out this thread.

Also - with the range your 955BE is showing, you may wish to experiment, and set single-click performance profiles with the AMD Fusion Utility for Desktops...

because you may well be able to establish not only high performance over-clocked profiles with your chip, but some seriously under-volted profiles for just surfin' around, goofing off and low-intensity background media encoding --- easily shaving 33% of your total power at 100% load (dropping from around 190w to 125w!)

Example: I un-locked and under-volted a 555BE to 1.18v at load to 127w at the wall ....



with C&Q at 0.83v ...



Note how your 'C&Q' volts at idle drop at the low-end as you under-volt/drop your overall CPU volts ?? You may find a sweet spot to move even lower than 0.99v <---> 1.38v BUT remember, most likely it's the low-end that will BSOD yah when you do this.

But ... that low-end is 0.825v with your 955BE, so you have room for a little experimenting with your 'low-power' profile.

Good luck, and keep up the excellent tweaking!





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a b À AMD
a b K Overclocking
April 1, 2011 8:17:20 PM

razaice said:
Sorry to hi-jack the thread a little but I have a question along these same lines. If I change my nb to 2400, should i leave the nb voltage on auto?


I'm not really sure what stock is ... 1.5v?

For 2400MHz IMC/NB you should not have to push it far, if at all. 1.1875v to 1.2v should easily give you all the juice you need.

edit ... that should be 1.15v !!!!

WARNING --- YOUR IMC WILL FRY


:lol: 
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April 1, 2011 11:19:15 PM

What would be a good way to test for stability of a nb overclock? Would it just bsod if it's unstable?
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April 2, 2011 7:01:02 AM

What are the temperatures on my motherboard? There's two sensors but I have no idea where they are.

And are they safe? Right now its running underload maxing the TMPIN0 @ 50*C and the latter sitting at 30*C.
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a b À AMD
a b K Overclocking
April 2, 2011 9:50:27 PM

razaice said:
What would be a good way to test for stability of a nb overclock? Would it just bsod if it's unstable?


Whatever stability program you are most comfortable with using ...


flashfir said:
What are the temperatures on my motherboard? There's two sensors but I have no idea where they are.

And are they safe? Right now its running underload maxing the TMPIN0 @ 50*C and the latter sitting at 30*C.
http://img684.imageshack.us/img684/3013/195multiplier13volts.png


I don't really know :D 

I suspect TMPIN0 is associated with your CPU -- not sure if the other is NB or SB or MB FETs or ??. Does TMPIN0 vary with your load? My understanding is the TMP designations (0, 1, 2 3, etc.) may vary from OEM to OEM, too.

I generally use a couple different programs to check (and my finger - LOL). Asus has a monitoring utility called Probe you may wish to consider.

Nothing seems to be off the scale ---
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April 3, 2011 6:46:35 AM

Two Questions:

ONE:
I'm actually wondering is there a difference between running these two different scenarios?

FSB: 240*16x = 3.8ghz
NB @ 2400mhz
vs.
FSB 200*19x = 3.8ghz
NB @ 2400mhz
Originally I wanted to try it because I thought I could run CnQ because the multiplier is what hindered it. I'm 99% sure it's the CPU's clockspeed because CnQ doesn't work at my 3.8ghz OC.

TWO:
The voltage I type in the Bios is different than that which will be ACTUALLY sent to the processor, right? As I can see in the voltage monitoring software... So I want to push my processor to the point where it IDLES as monitored, @ 1.4v?

Rather than putting in 1.4v in my Bios as I'm doing now?

Thanks a lot for your help! I'm a little slow in understanding all this :o 
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a b À AMD
a b K Overclocking
April 3, 2011 12:22:04 PM

NP -- we are all here to help and learn something along the way.

I have never seen a definitive test but the general consensus is that running 16x240MHz may feel a bit more 'snappy' (and I hope it doesn't 'bork' your C&Q - it shouldn't). Next time I snag a BE processor I'll try to run a few synthetics and see if anything pops out.

Your voltage is actually a lot like your temps in that you try to find a spot that just 'feels' right when comparing readings from different sources -- the BIOS, utilities, AOD, etc.
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