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Help OCing an i5 2500k on an ASRock P67 Extreme4 (B3) board?

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March 30, 2011 3:30:12 PM

I was trying to follow this OC guide:
http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/overclocking/39184-p67-s...

But I noticed that several options on the ASRock UEFI are different from those mentioned in the guide. I tried to follow the guide as well as I could but no matter what I tried it would either not boot at all or start to boot and BSOD. I never could get it to work so I returned it to default settings and just cranked the multiplier up to 45. It ran Prime95 for about 15 minutes before it crashed. Set the multiplier to 44 and Prime 95 ran for 3 hours with no problems. I ended up just stopping it because it never had any problems. Idle temps were roughly 20-25C and with Prime 95 running they stayed at about 45C but did occasionally break 50C. The max it ever hit during the 3 hours was 53C.

So, I have a stable 4.4 GHz, which is pretty good, but I would love to see 4.8 GHz or even 5 GHz if possible. Can anyone offer any ASRock specific advice or anyone have a similar build and can tell me their settings so I can try those?

Here is my full build info:

Case: Cooler Master HAF 912
PSU: OCZ Fatal1ty 550W
Motherboard: ASRock P67 Extreme4 B3
Processor: Intel i5 2500k
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212+
RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3 1600 (timings: 9-9-9-24-2N)
HDD: SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 1TB
Disk drive: Asus Black 24X SATA DVD burner
GPU: SAPPHIRE Vapor-X Radeon HD 5770
March 30, 2011 3:34:56 PM

Also, just to check it out I tried the boards auto overclock to 4.8 GHz and it reached the desktop but I got BSOD shortly after.
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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2011 4:25:59 PM

Every individual Sandy Bridge CPU has a multiplier that it cannot go past, no matter what voltage you apply or how cool you keep it. This is its "multiplier wall" and will usually indicate going above that by either not booting, or by giving BSODs like yours did.

If yours BSOD'd at the Turbo 4.8GHz preset, your maximum stable overclock is below that. Your dream of 5GHz just died ... sorry.

I'll post some ASRock-specific settings in a few minutes -- need to reboot and find out what mine are. lol
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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2011 4:58:40 PM

Okay...

Under OC Tweaker...
Internal PLL Overvoltage: Enabled
Intel SpeedStep Technology: Enabled
Intel Turbo Boost Technology: Enabled
PCH Voltage: 1.012v
CPU PLL Voltage: 1.857v
VTT Voltage: 1.116v
VCCSA Voltage: 0.925v

Under Advanced...
CPU Configuration...
Everything should be All, Auto, or Enabled

If the Internal PLL Overvoltage setting was disabled before, you should try the Turbo 4.8GHz option again with it enabled. It may be stable with that setting enabled, and if it is you might still reach 5GHz manually. If that setting was enabled before, then you likely won't be able to get even 4.8GHz stable. I'd give the Turbo 4.6GHz preset a try to see if that's stable.

Some of the guides recommend having the CStates, EIST, and such disabled. That's only for extreme overclocks. For everyday, you want those options enabled, as the processor was designed for those options to be working.
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March 30, 2011 5:31:05 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
Okay...

Under OC Tweaker...
Internal PLL Overvoltage: Enabled
Intel SpeedStep Technology: Enabled
Intel Turbo Boost Technology: Enabled
PCH Voltage: 1.012v
CPU PLL Voltage: 1.857v
VTT Voltage: 1.116v
VCCSA Voltage: 0.925v

Under Advanced...
CPU Configuration...
Everything should be All, Auto, or Enabled

If the Internal PLL Overvoltage setting was disabled before, you should try the Turbo 4.8GHz option again with it enabled. It may be stable with that setting enabled, and if it is you might still reach 5GHz manually. If that setting was enabled before, then you likely won't be able to get even 4.8GHz stable. I'd give the Turbo 4.6GHz preset a try to see if that's stable.

Some of the guides recommend having the CStates, EIST, and such disabled. That's only for extreme overclocks. For everyday, you want those options enabled, as the processor was designed for those options to be working.


What is your multiplier set to? 48?
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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2011 5:54:12 PM

Mine is, yes. Unless that Internal PLL Overvoltage setting was disabled before, you aren't stable at 4.8GHz. You'll need to try 4.7GHz and see whether that's stable.

Oh, and by the way, three hours on Prime95 is nothing. My own personal stability tests are these:

24 hours of each of the Prime95 Torture Test settings. (yes, 24 hours of small, then 24 hours of in-place large, then 24 hours of blend)
50 runs of IntelBurnTest on Maximum stress setting.

What you want to do is find the maximum multiplier you can run 100% stable. Then find the lowest CPU voltage setting you can use while maintaining that stability. When you're trying to find the maximum multiplier and minimum voltage that works, just do one hour of Prime95. Then do a five-run IntelBurnTest pass. Once you think you've found the maximum multiplier at minimum voltage settings, then do the 24-hour Prime95 and 50-run IntelBurnTest sessions to make sure it's actually stable.
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March 30, 2011 6:03:11 PM

I tried your settings and they didn't work for me. Instead of booting it just went to a black screen with a white cursor flashing and would only turn off by pressing and holding the power button.

The PLL Overvoltage was disabled before. I enabled it and tried again. So far so good, Prime95 has been running for 15 minutes. Room temp is 68F, CPU idle temps were 30C and load they are averaging 60C, max temp of any core so far was 65C.
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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2011 6:16:18 PM

If you're going to manually overclock, then you will need to change other settings as well:

Turbo Boost Power Limit: Manual
Short Duration Power Limit: 250
Long Duration Power Limit: 200
You may also want to increase the Turbo voltage right under those settings.

Just keep the CPU voltage under 1.4v and the peak core temps under 75ºC and you should be fine for an everyday overclock that will last years.

You tried my settings at what speed? Those work fine for me at 4.8GHz, but you may need to try them at stock speed first, then increase your multiplier from there. Also, when you're trying at 4.7GHz or higher, increase the VTT Voltage to ~1.2v and see if that helps. It didn't for me, but it helps some people get stable.
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March 30, 2011 6:22:47 PM

Is it safe to just stick with the 4.8 GHz preset? According to CPU-Z the core voltage is 1.41V. Is that OK?Temps are still averaging low 60s but have peaked a little higher. Core 0 hasn't gone above 63C, Core 1 and 2 have gone as high as 69C, and Core 3 hasn't gone above 64C.
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March 30, 2011 6:23:58 PM

Also, do I have to watch it, I have been watching the temps like a hawk just to be safe. Would it be safe for me to turn the TV on and just glance over every now and then?
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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2011 6:36:46 PM

You don't really need to worry about watching the temps. 75ºC is just a guideline, and the CPU will automatically lower its speed before it ever takes damage. The max safe core temp is 98ºC, but it's better to stay 20ºC below that for everyday operation.

As for voltage, again 1.4v is just a guideline. Most Sandy Bridge CPU wouldn't be damaged at 1.5v but we say 1.4v just because some weaker ones wouldn't last at higher than that. Keep your temps in check and the Turbo 4.8GHz setting will be fine.

Mine runs higher voltage and temps than yours, and has pretty much since I put it together in late January. I'm going to be ordering the final components for a water cooling setup in a few days to hopefully take care of the higher temps part anyway.
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March 30, 2011 9:04:33 PM

Temps are staying about the same and it has been going for over 3 hours now. I don't know about 24 hours or not, but I will keep it going as long as I an.
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March 31, 2011 5:25:04 AM

Left it on about 12 hours. As long as those temps and voltages are safe I will probably just stick with the preset. Thanks!
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March 31, 2011 5:26:19 AM

Best answer selected by chmcke01.
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April 10, 2011 2:29:07 AM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
You don't really need to worry about watching the temps. 75ºC is just a guideline, and the CPU will automatically lower its speed before it ever takes damage. The max safe core temp is 98ºC, but it's better to stay 20ºC below that for everyday operation.

As for voltage, again 1.4v is just a guideline. Most Sandy Bridge CPU wouldn't be damaged at 1.5v but we say 1.4v just because some weaker ones wouldn't last at higher than that. Keep your temps in check and the Turbo 4.8GHz setting will be fine.

Mine runs higher voltage and temps than yours, and has pretty much since I put it together in late January. I'm going to be ordering the final components for a water cooling setup in a few days to hopefully take care of the higher temps part anyway.




Hey Shadows,

Just wanted to tell you that ive been reading alot of threads and i always found that your posts are the most reliable and very accurate and informative keep up the good work!

Ive been looking around for a guide to overclock using the asrock uefi and havent found a good step by step guide like other mobo companies eg GB and asus.

I have win7 64bit a asrock extreme 4 mobo & and i5 2500k with 750w psu & 8gig ddr 1600 cl9 ram.

One thing ive found is that not many people mention about the power settings in windows putting it on high performance & if u should have IES on or off and lastly if the default overclock settings on the bios is fine to use without doing manual overclocking.

Thanks for the help keep up the good work!
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April 10, 2011 2:36:42 AM

chmcke01 said:
I was trying to follow this OC guide:
http://www.clunk.org.uk/forums/overclocking/39184-p67-s...

But I noticed that several options on the ASRock UEFI are different from those mentioned in the guide. I tried to follow the guide as well as I could but no matter what I tried it would either not boot at all or start to boot and BSOD. I never could get it to work so I returned it to default settings and just cranked the multiplier up to 45. It ran Prime95 for about 15 minutes before it crashed. Set the multiplier to 44 and Prime 95 ran for 3 hours with no problems. I ended up just stopping it because it never had any problems. Idle temps were roughly 20-25C and with Prime 95 running they stayed at about 45C but did occasionally break 50C. The max it ever hit during the 3 hours was 53C.

So, I have a stable 4.4 GHz, which is pretty good, but I would love to see 4.8 GHz or even 5 GHz if possible. Can anyone offer any ASRock specific advice or anyone have a similar build and can tell me their settings so I can try those?

Here is my full build info:

Case: Cooler Master HAF 912
PSU: OCZ Fatal1ty 550W
Motherboard: ASRock P67 Extreme4 B3
Processor: Intel i5 2500k
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212+
RAM: G.SKILL Ripjaws 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3 1600 (timings: 9-9-9-24-2N)
HDD: SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 1TB
Disk drive: Asus Black 24X SATA DVD burner
GPU: SAPPHIRE Vapor-X Radeon HD 5770



Dude i have the exact same comp as u same brands same models everything besides the psu & im using stock cpu cooler rofl weird!
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April 28, 2011 3:37:12 PM

joostvader said:
Hey Shadows,

Ive been looking around for a guide to overclock using the asrock uefi and havent found a good step by step guide like other mobo companies eg GB and asus.



joostvader,

I have the same build as yours and was wondering if you found the guide?
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April 28, 2011 3:39:59 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
I

Just keep the CPU voltage under 1.4v and the peak core temps under 75ºC and you should be fine for an everyday overclock that will last years.



Hi Leaps-from-Shadows,

Do you set this under CPU Core Voltage --> Fixed Mode?

Thanks!
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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
April 28, 2011 4:26:10 PM

No. The Fixed Mode setting won't allow the CPU to go into low-voltage idle mode.

Offset Mode will give you a fixed upper voltage, plus allow the CPU to reduce the voltage at idle like it does normally. I experimented to find the Offset Mode value that would give me 1.4v or so. For my board, it was +0.075v.

...and there is no guide for ASRock P67 boards that I have found.
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May 13, 2011 8:10:03 AM

Will these settings (or similar settings) work on an I5-2500k on an ASRock H61M/U3S3 mobo? I can't find any good guides for that particular board.

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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
May 14, 2011 2:29:09 AM

H61 boards are like H67 boards -- not designed for overclocking at all. H61 is even worse though, because it's meant for business use and the required overclocking settings are likely missing or disabled.

I wouldn't even bother trying to overclock with that board.
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May 31, 2011 3:14:42 AM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
If you're going to manually overclock, then you will need to change other settings as well:

Turbo Boost Power Limit: Manual
Short Duration Power Limit: 250
Long Duration Power Limit: 200
You may also want to increase the Turbo voltage right under those settings.

Just keep the CPU voltage under 1.4v and the peak core temps under 75ºC and you should be fine for an everyday overclock that will last years.

You tried my settings at what speed? Those work fine for me at 4.8GHz, but you may need to try them at stock speed first, then increase your multiplier from there. Also, when you're trying at 4.7GHz or higher, increase the VTT Voltage to ~1.2v and see if that helps. It didn't for me, but it helps some people get stable.



I hope you don't mind me joining the conversation. First off thank you to everyone for sharing info on OC' ing with this type of set up. I am thinking of having a bit of fun with my rig... basics are in the signature. I was wondering whether you get better results from slowly increasing speed through the use of the main bios as oppose to getting there via the tweak mechanism on the Asrock windows programme. I am not sure as I am a total noob at this but it has piqued my interest. Any comments (hopefully not rude..lol) appreciated.
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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
May 31, 2011 4:20:08 AM

The result will be the same either way -- each Sandy Bridge chip has a multiplier that it won't go past no matter how much voltage you give it. Finding that multiplier is fairly quick and easy -- the time consuming part is finding the minimum voltage required for that multiplier while still maintaining stability.

In overclocking my system, I jumped directly to the highest overclocking preset in my ASRock board's BIOS, which is 4.8GHz. That also happens to be the highest stable overclock speed I've gotten. My system can boot into Windows at up to 5.1GHz, but it freezes soon after. I always overclock the CPU through the BIOS -- the only overclocking software I use is for my graphics card. The overclocking programs for the CPU just don't have access to all of the settings that can make a difference while overclocking.
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May 31, 2011 7:04:29 AM

Thank you for clarifying that leaps for shadows.... ummm i might try 50x @ 1.4 v and work my volts down from there... maybe i got a lucky chip.lol
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a b V Motherboard
a c 239 K Overclocking
May 31, 2011 1:24:33 PM

I have a 2500K with an ASRock P67 Extreme 4, my overclocking approach is completely different from Leaps from Shadows and also works, that's the great thing about these CPUs as they are so versatile overclocking them.

So this is not to discount what L-f-S has already posted this is another route to a solid overclock, a link to my guide is in my signature below, but fair warning it is a hardcore overclock approach.
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a c 107 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
May 31, 2011 3:52:50 PM

I've actually used some of your advice and disabled C1E and all of the CStates stuff so the CPU stays at 4.8GHz all the time. However, I kept the other stuff like hardware prefetch enabled.

And I can't get over 4.6GHz with CPU PLL Overvoltage disabled, so I left that enabled to get the extra 200MHz of course.

I just wish that ASRock would leave LLC showing when you play with the CPU multipliers in the BIOS of my Pro3 board. I'd like to test the different levels out, but the setting disappears as soon as you choose manual for the CPU multiplier setting.
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a b V Motherboard
a c 239 K Overclocking
May 31, 2011 5:17:52 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
I've actually used some of your advice and disabled C1E and all of the CStates stuff so the CPU stays at 4.8GHz all the time. However, I kept the other stuff like hardware prefetch enabled.

And I can't get over 4.6GHz with CPU PLL Overvoltage disabled, so I left that enabled to get the extra 200MHz of course.

I just wish that ASRock would leave LLC showing when you play with the CPU multipliers in the BIOS of my Pro3 board. I'd like to test the different levels out, but the setting disappears as soon as you choose manual for the CPU multiplier setting.


Try disabling the hardware prefetch and see what happens.

Regarding PLL overvoltage I left it enabled all the way to 5ghz, and it never increased according to the Asrock Tuner program, which I use to keep and eye on voltage changes, so since it never increased at all past default disabled settings, I saw no reason to enable it's capability.

LLC will raise it's ugly head real fast if the supplied operating system voltage end of things drops at all, I tested that very thing to see what would happen.


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May 31, 2011 7:42:22 PM

Both you guys are amazing. I have read what you both have to say and I have also seen the results Asus posted in respect of the heavy testing they did on SB chips when sorting out the optimal for their Mobo.

From your posts and their review/report it seems evident that each SB chip has its own individual "Wall" beyond which it will not go , even if you put the total output of the Hoover Dam behind it.

Therefore the first thing I will do as part of my methodology is adopt 4Ryan's approach at the START of my experiment because using the fixed voltage will be the fastest way to determine the "Wall" for my particular chip ( saves messing and guessing in respect of picking an offset value).

Then I will (If I have a good enough chip) aim for a 24/7 rig with a multiplier of 45. Still using 4 Ryans method I will keep dropping my Fixed volts untill it goes unstable. Then i will return to the previous stable volt setting.

Once I have achieved that, I can flip to the suggestions in "Leaps from Shadows" posts by playing with the offset voltage until I find the offset figure which gives me the required vcore voltage ascertained in the earlier step.

Once that has been achieved then I can enable the C states and I will have a rig that Turbo boosts to 4.5GHz under load and drops back to a sensible (for me) 1.6GHz at idle. ( the advantage to me seems to be that I will use less power, even though it is less than an average light bulb, but more importantly less volts @ CPU equals less heat.

Finally. My Questions;

Have I read you guys right, Have I understood what you are posting, Does this look to be on the right track??

Kindest Regards
Lex.
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a b V Motherboard
a c 239 K Overclocking
June 1, 2011 10:25:47 AM

@Lex_Sinistre

Since you have exactly the same M/B as I do, the settings to disable in the guide will be exactly the same as written in your BIOS setup.

By all means go for it and post everything you discover, you definitely have my attention.

45x should be able to run with my suggested settings at 1.325v, depending on hardware manufacturing differences that will be close in the ballpark either + or - that setting.

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