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Bios password

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2009 1:18:57 PM

i have forgotten my dell latitude e5400 bios password

More about : bios password

August 25, 2009 2:10:05 PM

That is the correct solution. I would do that.
August 25, 2009 4:50:34 PM

For Dell's normally there is another jumper to reset password and resetting cmos will not reset password.

Off to Dell website to check this model
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August 25, 2009 4:58:50 PM

That's a laptop so You are out of luck. Most of modern laptops are made so that You cannot reset passwor easily because laptops are being stolen much more then desktops.

You should call Dell Support and If You can proove You are legal owner they might provide you master pasword which will reset it. Or You might send it to Dell service to reset it but I am afraid that will cost You.

Else Your only options are to replace motherboard or to replace RTC chip on motherboard( or it might be another chip that saves the password)
August 25, 2009 5:34:20 PM

Laptops store passwords in a way that it is useless to clear the cmos . This is done for obvious security reasons. If you can prove Dell that you are the legitimate owner of the laptop they may or not assist you
August 25, 2009 6:09:21 PM

vladtepes said:
Laptops store passwords in a way that it is useless to clear the cmos . This is done for obvious security reasons. If you can prove Dell that you are the legitimate owner of the laptop the may or not assist you


I wasn't aware of this. Thanks for the info! Sounds like a pain!
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2009 6:42:12 PM

Ya, forgeting your bios passwords is just something that is impossible to happen, since you need it everytime you turn it on. The laptop is obviously stolen. The wise thing would be to return it to the owner or the police.
August 25, 2009 6:54:30 PM

daship said:
Ya, forgeting your bios passwords is just something that is impossible to happen, since you need it everytime you turn it on. The laptop is obviously stolen. The wise thing would be to return it to the owner or the police.


LMFAO.

Not necessarily true. The password may not be a system startup password but rather a BIOS settings password.
August 25, 2009 6:54:53 PM

Have you forgotten the bios set up password or the start up password? There is a work around.
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2009 7:38:57 PM

TechnologyCoordinator said:
I wasn't aware of this. Thanks for the info! Sounds like a pain!




Not all cmos batterys hold laptop passwords..

Some chips hold them too..

AST were used by the us gov for the reason that their laptops had the best password security

Shame that they are no longer

the information is recorded on a pic chip on this dell and can be removed by using a paper clip.

Dell also have a Dell Engineer Password to change it.
August 25, 2009 10:03:42 PM

shabaa said:
Have you forgotten the bios set up password or the start up password? There is a work around.



Usually a notebook with a password implies a startup and bios setup ONLY password. Is an anti theft and anti intruder measure. It's very revealing that the same user who created this post is very VERY new and his post is this only one. Also he hasn't replied to any of our answers :whistle: 
a b à CPUs
August 26, 2009 2:53:48 AM

on this subject - I actually have a friend of a friend, the mother of a deceased son, with an old Dell desktop circa 1998. It apparently has a bios password and she hasn't been able to access it since he passed away ten years ago. Will it likely have a password jumper on the board, or will CMOS clear it, or will we need to call Dell?
August 26, 2009 4:14:54 AM

notherdude said:
on this subject - I actually have a friend of a friend, the mother of a deceased son, with an old Dell desktop circa 1998. It apparently has a bios password and she hasn't been able to access it since he passed away ten years ago. Will it likely have a password jumper on the board, or will CMOS clear it, or will we need to call Dell?



I guess she should better go to a notebook lab, Dell will be mostly useless and expensive in this case. Another idea, if she wants to access her son's data she'd better take out the hdd and use an ide to usb adapter. A 98' notebook is totally out of date, except for sentimental value
August 26, 2009 6:34:18 AM

vladtepes said:
I guess she should better go to a notebook lab, Dell will be mostly useless and expensive in this case. Another idea, if she wants to access her son's data she'd better take out the hdd and use an ide to usb adapter. A 98' notebook is totally out of date, except for sentimental value


I'm thinking if a guy had a non-work desktop PC with a BIOS password on it back in 1998, there's a good chance that there's stuff on that HD that a mother would not want to see.

File this one under "let sleeping dogs lie"...
a b à CPUs
August 26, 2009 7:46:31 AM

notherdude said:
on this subject - I actually have a friend of a friend, the mother of a deceased son, with an old Dell desktop circa 1998. It apparently has a bios password and she hasn't been able to access it since he passed away ten years ago. Will it likely have a password jumper on the board, or will CMOS clear it, or will we need to call Dell?



What model of Dell is it and ill find the info.

I dont know how many models of Dells there are, not that I care for them either way. But yes there is away of removing the password from that Dell PC. Just let me know the model and ill look it up.

Try this first

Open up the machine then look for the password jumper. There should be a mark or label there indicating which one it is. This is usually the 3 pin CMOS jumper.

When you see it, open the computer case. If necessary take the user guide and compare the layout. The pins will be labeled or on "1" and "2". To reset a Dell BIOS password, pull off the two jumpers. Place them on the number 2 and 3 pins. Leave them there for 5 seconds. Now, pull the jumpers off and set them on pins 1 and 2.
August 26, 2009 10:35:30 AM

notherdude said:
on this subject - I actually have a friend of a friend, the mother of a deceased son, with an old Dell desktop circa 1998. It apparently has a bios password and she hasn't been able to access it since he passed away ten years ago. Will it likely have a password jumper on the board, or will CMOS clear it, or will we need to call Dell?


Sorry about my previous reply, I didn't see the word "desktop". Just clear CMOS with the jumper
August 26, 2009 11:07:05 AM

vladtepes said:
Sorry about my previous reply, I didn't see the word "desktop". Just clear CMOS with the jumper


Agreed.

If it's a desktop just clear the jumper or remove the CMOS battery.
a b à CPUs
August 27, 2009 12:02:48 AM

Thanks everyone!
a b à CPUs
August 6, 2010 2:53:26 PM

a b à CPUs
August 6, 2010 3:01:10 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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