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Dual-Channel DDR3 2000(O.C.)/1333/ 1066 support?

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March 31, 2011 6:09:48 PM

Hey everyone, trying to squeeze every drop out of my system and do not quite understand what it means about my ASUS M4A88TD-V EVO USB3.0 mobo specs that say Dual-Channel DDR3 2000(O.C.)/1333/ 1066 support. Does that mean I can overclock my DDR3 13333 Kingston 4 Gb X 2 RAM to 2000? I have it OC'd to 1600 already with no problems with the timings 9-9-9-24. Or would changing the timings give me better performance? I changed my FSB from [AUTO] to 2600 and it made a huge difference. So what do you all think about overclocking the RAM to 2000? Is it possible? I have the 125w Phenom II 965 in there with crossfire HD 5770's and the CPU is overclocked to 4.07GHz without a hitch. Also, my mobo states - up to 5200 MTs - Hypertransport 3.0. What the heck is that talking about and how do I use it to my advantage? Just looking to learn all I can and have looked through Tom's forums and can't seem to nail down anyone who has the same questions to find answers on my own. I try searching before I ask so I don't sound totally stupid. It is just so many settings in the BIOS and AMD Overdrive that I am not sure of. This is my first build and already had to update the PSU from 500w to 750w and CPU cooler with a Noctua NH-D14. I am learning, but it is a steep curve. I have gotten some great help here @ Tom's and really like the people who help us newbee's. So what is everyones advice? :hello: 
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
April 1, 2011 12:29:04 AM

It means that the CPUs that board can handle will only support up to 1333 memory officially. To go higher than that is overclocking, and is not guaranteed to work. And yes, you could theoretically get your 1333 memory to 2000 speeds, but it's highly unlikely.

The "5200 MTs - Hypertransport 3.0" is the method the board uses to transfer data between the CPU and the rest of the system. Depending on the CPU installed, it can do up to 5200 million data transfers per second. This isn't something you can control.
April 1, 2011 12:08:29 PM

Leaps-from-Shadows said:
It means that the CPUs that board can handle will only support up to 1333 memory officially. To go higher than that is overclocking, and is not guaranteed to work. And yes, you could theoretically get your 1333 memory to 2000 speeds, but it's highly unlikely.

The "5200 MTs - Hypertransport 3.0" is the method the board uses to transfer data between the CPU and the rest of the system. Depending on the CPU installed, it can do up to 5200 million data transfers per second. This isn't something you can control.



I have the RAM OC'd to 1666, but had to turn down the voltage from 1.8 to 1.55. I benchmarked it on AMD OD and it was around 9500. I know that is not a good benchmark, but was quick. Will check everything and run 3DMark Advantage I just got. Will my mobo ASUS M4A88tTD-V EVO USB3.0 handle RAM that is 1666 and overclockable to 2000? I have a bottle neck some where and I think it is the RAM, not my AMD Phenom II 125w 965 with a HUGE Noctua NH-D14 sitting on top of it. It overclocks easily to 4.0GHz stable.
a b } Memory
a b K Overclocking
April 1, 2011 4:25:58 PM

RAM speed is almost never a bottleneck, even at lowly 1066 speed. RAM bottlenecks are mostly capacity-related -- for instance, trying to run Win7 with only 2GB. If you've got 4GB, then RAM isn't your problem.

Any bottleneck you may have is likely due to your 5770s in CrossFire. The 5770 just isn't all that great a graphics card for today's demanding games.
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