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Cooler Master Hyper 212 plus with push/pull

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  • Heatsinks
  • Cooler Master
  • Cases
  • Overclocking
  • Product
Last response: in Overclocking
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April 1, 2011 3:16:20 PM

Hi,

I have a cooler master elite 430 case with Phenom II x4 955 BE processor.

I finally got these into my case now:

1 120mm front intake
1 120mm bottom intake
1 120mm side intake
1 120mm top exhaust
1 120mm rear exhaust

the fans installed above is:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod [...] 6835103024



and 2 120mm fans in push/pull for cooler master hyper 212 plus cooler.

but the problem is I installed 1 120mm fan which came default with the hyper 212 plus

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


and the other fan is http://www.scythe-usa.com/product/acc/026/sy1225sl_deta...

so my question is, can I use two different fans with push/pull on the hyper 212 plus.

More about : cooler master hyper 212 push pull

a c 249 K Overclocking
April 2, 2011 1:02:51 PM

The fan you chose will deliver about the same CFM if it runs flat out, so you should be OK with that fan, just make sure if you power them from M/B headers they're set in the BIOS to run full speed.
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April 2, 2011 2:23:13 PM

Well, that's ok. I will probably get another blade master R4 fan for the push/pull config on my Hyper 212 plus.


My other concern is I have reapplied the thermal paste (Arctic Silver 5) using the middle dot method. I placed the dot at the center of the CPU and then put the heatsink on. Is it the correct method. I know that Arctic Silver 5 requires 200 hrs of break in period.


and Now I also have changed the airflow in my case to:


1 120 mm front intake
1 120mm bottom intake
1 120mm side intake
1 120mm top exhaust
1 120mm rear exhaust (high speed 1900rpm fan - Scythe Kaze - Zyuni)

Should I change any fan placements in my case to get the best Possible airflow. I am using a Cooler Master Elite 430 Case.



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a b K Overclocking
April 2, 2011 3:25:56 PM

Looks like a very good arrangement. Ideal air flow pattern.
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April 2, 2011 3:58:47 PM

Thanks, but you did not answer my main question.

I have reapplied the thermal paste (Arctic Silver 5) using the middle dot method. I placed the dot at the center of the CPU and then put the Cooler Master Hyper 212 plus heatsink on. I know that Arctic Silver 5 requires 200 hrs of break in period.

Is this the correct method or should I do something different.
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a b K Overclocking
April 2, 2011 9:10:23 PM

irfan88 said:
Thanks, but you did not answer my main question.

I have reapplied the thermal paste (Arctic Silver 5) using the middle dot method. I placed the dot at the center of the CPU and then put the Cooler Master Hyper 212 plus heatsink on. I know that Arctic Silver 5 requires 200 hrs of break in period.

Is this the correct method or should I do something different.

I prefer applying a pea-sized ball of AS5 in the middle of the CPU and then spreading it all around using my finger wrapped in plastic wrap (Saran wrap, Reynolds wrap). Try and obtain as thin a film as possible. Do the same with the bottom of the heatsink. Then assemble the heatsink to the CPU.

If you desire better results, then polish the base of the heatsink. Leave the CPU alone. Here is a little guide that I wrote on the topic:

Guide to Polishing Heatsink bases.

Polishing Heatsink bases is usually done by enthusiasts in order to improve heat transfer between the CPU and the heatsink. This, when done correctly results in lower CPU temps, thereby prolonging CPU life and also improving Overclocking capabilities.

Polishing is loosely referred to as "Lapping", but let it be known that whereas polishing can be done at home on a flat work surface, lapping can only be done utilizing highly accurate, expensive, and precise Lapping Machines costing tens of thousands of dollars.

Flatness and an improvement in micro finish is the objective, not necessarily a mirror finish. Frequently, after polishing, the improved flatness and the fine micro finish will make the surface look more or less like a mirror finish.

Tools requited are 1200 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper, 2000 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper (optional), elbow grease, and a few drops of water.

Here are the series of steps for polishing the base of a heatsink:

1. Find a flat surface to use as a base. A piece of 12" x 12" x 1/4" glass will work (glass top cocktail table, end table, breakfast table).

2. Lay a full sheet of 1200 grit Silicon Carbide paper flat on the glass surface and ensure that this sheet does not slip or slide during the polishing process. Put about 4 drops of water in the center of this sheet.

3. Place the heatsink base squarely over the center of the Silicon Carbide paper and gently start moving the heatsink base back and forth in about 2" strokes. The direction of the stroking must be towards you and away from you. Care must be taken not to tip the heatsink while you are doing this. Use a light downward force. Light force. Light force. Holding the heatsink closer to the base will help. Again, light downward force. (Practice doing this on a sheet of plain paper first if necessary - this will give you confidence).

4. Continue the stroking towards you and away from you, staying on the same central area of the Silicon Carbide sheet. Move your body (not the work piece) about 30 degrees and continue the stroking. Like dancing around a May pole. This will change the polishing direction on the heatsink base. Repeat for about 10 minutes.

5. By now, you will notice that the polishing residue on the Silicon Carbide paper is reddish - this is the color of the copper base under the Nickel plating film that is now polished away. Using the edge of a razor blade is an approximation of a straight edge. It is not a straight edge, but will give you ball park information that is close enough.

6. Continue for 10 more minutes on the same sheet of Silicon Carbide paper, and you are done. VIOLA!

7. Continuing Polishing with the 2000 grit paper is purely optional. Like icing (frosting) on the cake.


A note about the CPU: Leave the CPU alone. The heat spreader of the CPU is a sheet metal component made by the draw (see "deep drawing”) process. The thermal expansion characteristics of thin sheet metal drawn parts are hard to determine. I am reasonably sure (oxymoron?) that there will be some improvement in heat transfer if the high spots at the corners of the CPU are polished away, but the marginal gains may not be worth the efforts. Therefore, I am not recommending any polishing of the CPU. Another point to note would be that any alteration will void the warranty.
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April 3, 2011 2:29:17 AM

Ok, as suggested. I have re-applied the AS5 thermal paste by filling the gaps between the heat pipes using a credit card and also applied a very thin layer of the paste on the CPU as well. Is that ok now.

I should probably wait for 200 hrs as the break in period of the paste is over 200 hrs.


I also have the hyper 212 plus fan towards the front side of my case drawing air over my memory and exhausting it towards the rear.

Should I change any setup of the airflow in my case.
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April 3, 2011 3:00:57 AM

so you mean to say that I can still use the PC even though my break in period is not over. right!!!!!!!!!!
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a b K Overclocking
April 3, 2011 3:25:12 PM

irfan88 said:
so you mean to say that I can still use the PC even though my break in period is not over. right!!!!!!!!!!

Start using it right away! (Keep in mind, the concrete used to build the Hoover Dam in the mid 30s is still curing in the core).
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