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Gigabyte Ex-58 ud3r rev 1.6 turns on for one second then off.

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November 12, 2009 5:08:37 AM

I've had my ud3r rev 1.6 for around 1-2 months now
I have a i7-920 d0
and a hd 4890
blah blah

Everything was working fine monday. And I ordered a new cpu cooler, ocz gladiator max, because I wanted to do some oc'ing.
It arrived Tues and I installed it, exactly to what the manual said on the force 2 retention kit.
The cooler is too big for my case so I was like oh well I dont care Ill get another case later on, but after installing the cooler I turned the pc on and checked bios for the temps
at stock, 2.67ghz, it was running at 63 degrees, so I was like okay a tad odd.
I applied a thin thin sheet of thermo paste and everything properly
I rotated it a different way
tried again
same temps
i under clocked it to 2.3ghz
still sitting at 50
i called the business i bought it off and they said im doing something wrong, and i told them no I am doing everything to the manual and they tried to say it was too much thermo paste
and im like no the tiny cheap amount ocz gives you couldnt be too much and its in a tiny paper thin spread over the cpu
so they just disagreed. so i thought stuff the cooler, i put my stock one back on, turned it on and went to bios, i zoned out watching a bit of tv for a minute then when i checked my pc health settings, it said the cpu was at 75
so i was sort of shocked and switched it off, re adjusted the stock one to make sure it was seated right and now i went to turn it back on and here is where the issue is.
I press the power button, my gpu span up, my case fans span up, the cpu fan span up for literally 1 - 1.5 seconds then bam, its off, i pressed the on button again and it just did the same thing.
ive removed the gpu, ram and then tried again, same thing.
took the cpu out, checked the mobo pins and checked the cpu, all fine.
so i am dumb founded, any help i send my thanks in advance
a c 177 V Motherboard
November 12, 2009 12:12:47 PM

Still sounds to me like it's going into thermal shutdown, pretty much instantly...
Get some (cheap, but really great) thermal paste from these guys:
http://www.tim-consultants.com/matrix1.html
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
Do not 'spread' TIM (any - ever), you can't reuse TIM (any - ever), must clean up with a solvent between reapplications; the 0098 is 'thixotropic' - it has lower viscosity when in shear, so you just apply and 'wiggle' the HSF down into place to get a perfect spread every time...
Double check your HSF mounting hardware - carefully! Did you remember to put on the mylar insulators? Tighten the screws evenly and sufficiently (should be an equal, very slight 'bend' to the retaining arms)? [Amusing - whoever wrote the OCZ instructions for the 1366 mount doesn't know what an allen key is - illustrates 'allen key', while plainly showing some kind of little 'spanner' type wrench!]
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November 12, 2009 7:38:19 PM

bilbat said:
Still sounds to me like it's going into thermal shutdown, pretty much instantly...
Get some (cheap, but really great) thermal paste from these guys:
http://www.tim-consultants.com/matrix1.html
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
Do not 'spread' TIM (any - ever), you can't reuse TIM (any - ever), must clean up with a solvent between reapplications; the 0098 is 'thixotropic' - it has lower viscosity when in shear, so you just apply and 'wiggle' the HSF down into place to get a perfect spread every time...
Double check your HSF mounting hardware - carefully! Did you remember to put on the mylar insulators? Tighten the screws evenly and sufficiently (should be an equal, very slight 'bend' to the retaining arms)? [Amusing - whoever wrote the OCZ instructions for the 1366 mount doesn't know what an allen key is - illustrates 'allen key', while plainly showing some kind of little 'spanner' type wrench!]


Thanks for replying bilbat.
Yeah thats what I was presuming, I was reading another thread about this other guy who had the reboot loop, I didnt know if his board was rev 1.6 or 1.0 but it was looping instead of just turning off like mine and someone posted about the thermo shutdown and this PROCHET or something that the cpu does within like a second.
Thanks for those links I'll buy some tonight, also in that picture in the second link, you can see the dodgy thermo paste ocz gave me in the bottom left, the white satchel -_-
Yep, I painstakingly checked it everytime I tried to mount it and had to suppress my frustration with the whole damn thing. And definitely didn't forget the mylar!
Well with the screws they supply with it, I screwed it evenly on each side, then they just stop at a point and I was sorta not expecting them to have spun through their whole thread that fast but the cooler seemed firm?
HAH, yeah I noticed that, at first I thought it said 'alien key' but I had never heard of such a thing!
Ocz need to maybe re-inspect their manuals and such, I remember as I was reading them, one instruction says, squeeze the thermal paste directly onto the base of the cooler and place on cpu, when the thermo paste is quite liquidity and crap.
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a c 177 V Motherboard
November 12, 2009 11:11:01 PM

It's PROCHOT (processor hot - for once, an acronymn that makes sense!), and the Intel thermal spec says, in effect, that in one-half second from PROCHOT you have molten silicon if you don't shut 'er down! And, the detection method has some chip-to-chip variability, so everyone wants to stay way on the safe side of that half second... Sounds to me like it's the exact same attachment hardware that's on my 775 D-Tek FuZion waterblock - it's actually foolproof! I was so impressed with it, after having struggled with a number of manufacturer's garbage HSF attachment methods, that I emailed D-Tek, and told them they were wasting their time selling a few water-blocks, they should sell every HSF manufacturer their attachment hardware!
Quote:
Ocz need to maybe re-inspect their manuals and such

Every manufacturer in the whole computer business needs to do this! It seems like the manuals are always an afterthought, and written by an office flunky who'd have trouble plugging in a toaster... Another bit I noticed was, directly above the caption saying to put the compound on the center of the sink, is a picture of it being squeezed onto the outer part of the second heat pipe :pt1cable: 

You always want to apply your paste in a 'blob' (Arctic recommends a line for quads, and illustrates here:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions....
for various processors); what I recommend doing, once you have enough to throw a little away, is to scrounge up some fairly thick (at least a quarter inch, preferably a half) clear acrylic (PlexiGlas, Lucite) or polycarbonate (Lexan), cut some two inch squares, and 'squeeze' some 'blobs' between them so you can see exactly what you're getting from what sized 'blob' - and you'll see, immediately, why they recommend a 'blob' rather than any king of method of spreading it; with a 'blob', you push the air out ahead of the material - with any kind of 'spread' you can come up with, you always entrain air bubbles - and they can be fatal (to your processor, not to you :kaola:  )!




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