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Drive capacity and performance

Hello friends at toms.
Quick question; Does an SSD's capacity affect performance in any way. Will a 256GB drive perform faster than a 64 GB drive of the same manufacturer.

Can any one direct me to articles related to installing an SSD to replace a HDD for booting. How to's.

Thanks You all
14 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about drive capacity performance
  1. I believe setting up an SSD is no different to setting up an HDD, you simply quick format it and then install the OS and Drivers for the hardware. It is not the capacity of the drive that matters in performance/speed.
  2. In general, larger SSD capacity improves performance. More dies = greater bandwidth.
    Compare same make/model 64g, 128c and 256g SSD's and note the difference in read and write speeds. Crucials sata III ssd's show a large (2x) improvement in write speeds from 64g to 128g. I'll use them in this link as an example:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Productcompare.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100008120%2050001455&IsNodeId=1&bop=And&CompareItemList=636|20-148-361^20-148-361-TS%2C20-148-362^20-148-362-TS%2C20-148-363^20-148-363-TS
  3. I see the write speed increases sequentially with the size of the drive but the read speed stays the same. I'm thinking of purchasing one of three: Crucial, Intel or the Samsung 470. These 3 seem to be at the top of most charts.
    There are some good articles here at Toms that I have to finish.

    More questions if you don't mind.
    Is the SATA 3 drive backward compatable with the SATA 2 connection or an I purchase an adapter.

    Thanks for your time.
  4. i think all the sata cables are the same.... its all about your mobo supporting sata 3 or not
  5. Best answer
    The controller in the SSD reads from and writes to the actual flash memory chips in parallel. The more chips, the more parallelism and the faster the SSD can transfer data (but access times aren't affected).

    So for a given SSD controller, more capacity = better performance as long as you don't reach speeds where the controller itself or the host interface becomes the bottleneck.
  6. You might want to wait until more SSD vendors have released
    SATA/6G and SAS/6G models.

    The current SATA standard is 6G (6 Gigabits per second over data cables):

    with one start bit, 8 data bits, and one stop bit, there are 10 physical bits
    for each byte aka the 10/8 protocol: so, divide by 10 to get 600 MB/second.

    It is quite possible that the wider availability of SATA/6G SSDs
    will depress prices for SATA/3G SSDs.

    SandForce has announced their intentions to release their SF-2000
    series SSD controllers, all of which are planned to support 6G transmission
    speeds (over the data cables):

    http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1429/1/

    Meanwhile, you can see measurable gains by upgrading to a modern HDD
    that uses perpendicular magnetic recording, and by "short-stroking"
    your system partition (usually C: on Windows computers). Here's why:




    PMR also allows tracks to be much closer together, which helps explain
    the gentle slopes in the graphs above.

    We are consistently measuring 150MB/second with the WD5003ABYX
    using the ATTO benchmark: only $80 at Newegg!


    MRFS
  7. 2 x WD5003ABYX in RAID-0, ASUS P5W64 WS Professional,
    Intel Q6600, 2 x 2GB Corsair XMS2 DDR2-800, and
    Highpoint RocketRAID 2340 controller:




    Single WD5003ABYX result is here using the Intel ICH7R I/O controller hub:




    Pre-set overclock in the BIOS of FSB1333/DDR2-834 w/ SpeedStep enabled:
    Bus Speed = 333 MHz, DRAM Frequency = 417 MHz.


    MRFS
  8. omnisome said:
    I believe setting up an SSD is no different to setting up an HDD, you simply quick format it and then install the OS and Drivers for the hardware. It is not the capacity of the drive that matters in performance/speed.



    I seems in everything I've read so far an SSD drives capacity certainly effects performance/speed.
    Sminli said "The more chips, the more parallelism and the faster the SSD can transfer data". thats seem to be the general notion.
  9. Sminli's right.

    Are you also asking 'How to upgrade?' The answer is to re-install from scratch. Cloning may, or may not, cause problems but the only way it will not cause problems is if you do a whole bunch of work...
  10. omnisome said:
    I believe setting up an SSD is no different to setting up an HDD, you simply quick format it and then install the OS and Drivers for the hardware. It is not the capacity of the drive that matters in performance/speed.

    To get the best performance out of your SSD, you need to do some tweaking to Windows.
    http://www.computing.net/howtos/show/solid-state-drive-ssd-tweaks-for-windows-7/552.html

    I cloned my drive with Acronis and it worked great. I followed the article above but most of it was already set correctly by Windows 7.
  11. omnisome said:
    I believe setting up an SSD is no different to setting up an HDD, you simply quick format it and then install the OS and Drivers for the hardware. It is not the capacity of the drive that matters in performance/speed.


    Everything I've read and all responses are completely opposite of what you say. The drives capacity directly relates to performance. The larger the drive the more read and writes. Check your notes. Thanks anyway.
  12. adampower said:
    Sminli's right.

    Are you also asking 'How to upgrade?' The answer is to re-install from scratch. Cloning may, or may not, cause problems but the only way it will not cause problems is if you do a whole bunch of work...


    No, I didn't ask that. ???
  13. sminlal said:
    The controller in the SSD reads from and writes to the actual flash memory chips in parallel. The more chips, the more parallelism and the faster the SSD can transfer data (but access times aren't affected).

    So for a given SSD controller, more capacity = better performance as long as you don't reach speeds where the controller itself or the host interface becomes the bottleneck.


    Sminli, thanks for your short direct answer. To many people go "off subject" in these forums. You get the BA award. Thanks.
  14. Best answer selected by gerry410.
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