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Intel Pentium D 2.67Ghz

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August 27, 2009 1:37:30 AM

how will my system run for new games and upcoming games for the next 6-9 months??


Intel Pentium D 2.67Ghz
Intel D945GTP Motherboard
4GB DDR2 PC2 4200 Memory
RADEON 4850 1GB Graphics Card

will games like upcoming assassins creed 2 and battlefield 1943, diablo, starcraft 2 run good on my system? like will it lag or no lag? please write back. thanks

More about : intel pentium 67ghz

August 27, 2009 2:53:42 AM

The processor might bottleneck you graphic card. I think you may be able to play games with that processor but you may want to overclock it a little bit !

You can easily reach 3 ghz with an after market heatsink !
August 27, 2009 3:19:48 AM

That D 805 is definitely a bottleneck. It was basic, entry level dual core computing back in the day, and time has made it look even worse. I understand that you probably cannot put a newer Core Duo type of CPU in your motherboard, but just to give you an idea, the Celeron e1500 that newegg currently sells as the cheapest intel dual core CPU at $50, is the gaming equivalent of a 3.0+ GHz Pentium D. The only dual core slower than your CPU is the Atom 330. Overclocking your D 805 will definitely help the situation a bit.
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August 27, 2009 12:07:21 PM

The D series is not a dual core, its two Pentium 4's wired together. Worse, those things run extraordinarilly hot, which tends to have the CPU throttle, making more of a bottleneck.

I'd say any GPU better then a 8800GT running on any Pentium D is being bottlenecked. I also doubt you're mobo accepts C2D's, although its worth checking out...
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August 27, 2009 3:32:56 PM

The processor is bottlenecking your video card, but with a 4850 you'd be able to play decently for roughly the next 6 months. Though if you could afford a good aftermarket HSF, it is advisable to OC it. If you could reach around 3.2 or 3.4 you're are the entry level C2D's at 1.8GHz or 2.0GHz which isn't really that bad anymore.
August 27, 2009 3:41:58 PM

i need info on overclocking...never done it before
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August 27, 2009 4:55:14 PM

Even an OC'd Pentium D is hopelessly obsolete. Besides, you're far more likely to melt the Pentium D in place then get any significant gains...
August 27, 2009 5:50:50 PM

the processor is huge bottlenect for your graphics card. it would be preferable you upgrade to a intel core based processor and overclock.
All netburst processors would be a bottleneck to any upcoming game in the next 6 to 9 months
August 27, 2009 5:51:11 PM

gamerk316 said:
The D series is not a dual core, its two Pentium 4's wired together. Worse, those things run extraordinarilly hot, which tends to have the CPU throttle, making more of a bottleneck.

I'd say any GPU better then a 8800GT running on any Pentium D is being bottlenecked. I also doubt you're mobo accepts C2D's, although its worth checking out...

That's an ignorant perspective on dual core architecture. So, the Intel Q9550 is not a quadcore? It just happens to match or beat similarly clocked "true" quads. So much for your played-out architecture remark having any real tangible effect on performance. Oh, and BTW, the Pentium D 800 series, such as this 805, is technically a monolithic design. It's two cores on one die. It wasn't until Presler that Intel wised-up and began pumping out two separate dies on one package. Do to Intel not having an IMC, the cores would always be forced to use the FSB to communicate through the memory controller, so separating them up into separate dies increased the available yields without changing how they operate. If you really think about it, the K8 Athlon X2, which AMD fanboys heralded for it's "true dual core" monolithic design, communicates the same way as the Pentium D does between cores, by using the memory controller. The only big difference being that the memory controller is on the die and therefore runs at a much higher frequency, decreasing lag time and increasing throughput. There is very heated debate whether or not any core to core information ever travels through crossbar on the K8 X2. Face it, the first "true" x86 dual core came with the advent of the Core 2 Duo, which used a shared L2 cache, and therefore direct core to core communication.


EDIT: And perhaps you're too new to computing to remember, but the D 805 is a very capable overclocking CPU. It is very easy to overclock to 3.33GHz on stock voltage and stock HSF, which would give you the gaming performance of an Athlon X2 3800. Yes, still a bottle neck, but way better than at stock, and best of all FREE PERFORMANCE.
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August 27, 2009 6:57:47 PM

Oh snap, he has an Intel board, the 945 kind, the no overclocking options kind.

I guess your next step would be to buy a 775 board that supports overclocking, that is the cheapest route. But since you're going to buy a board already, a cheap Core 2 is not out of the question.

Long story short, you're going to be forced to buy a Core 2 Duo.
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August 27, 2009 9:58:55 PM

joefriday said:
That's an ignorant perspective on dual core architecture. So, the Intel Q9550 is not a quadcore? It just happens to match or beat similarly clocked "true" quads. So much for your played-out architecture remark having any real tangible effect on performance. Oh, and BTW, the Pentium D 800 series, such as this 805, is technically a monolithic design. It's two cores on one die. It wasn't until Presler that Intel wised-up and began pumping out two separate dies on one package. Do to Intel not having an IMC, the cores would always be forced to use the FSB to communicate through the memory controller, so separating them up into separate dies increased the available yields without changing how they operate. If you really think about it, the K8 Athlon X2, which AMD fanboys heralded for it's "true dual core" monolithic design, communicates the same way as the Pentium D does between cores, by using the memory controller. The only big difference being that the memory controller is on the die and therefore runs at a much higher frequency, decreasing lag time and increasing throughput. There is very heated debate whether or not any core to core information ever travels through crossbar on the K8 X2. Face it, the first "true" x86 dual core came with the advent of the Core 2 Duo, which used a shared L2 cache, and therefore direct core to core communication.


EDIT: And perhaps you're too new to computing to remember, but the D 805 is a very capable overclocking CPU. It is very easy to overclock to 3.33GHz on stock voltage and stock HSF, which would give you the gaming performance of an Athlon X2 3800. Yes, still a bottle neck, but way better than at stock, and best of all FREE PERFORMANCE.


i started reading then i remembered: pentium D still sucks. gg.
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August 28, 2009 6:46:35 AM

werxen said:
i started reading then i remembered: pentium D still sucks. gg.

It may suck but it's what other people are stuck with, and there are those that don't have the money to buy a whole new rig.
!