Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Is my Seagate 1 Tb drive stuffed?

Last response: in Windows XP
Share
October 29, 2011 4:23:19 AM

I have tried all the tricks for fixing "NTLDR missing" - and now am trying CHKDSK as 2nd-last resort. 2nd-last, because it might "fix" things it shouldn't, so I would have to replace all the s/w - going back 10 years, as last resort. Perhaps I have to do this anyway, either to reformat or replace the HD. This PC is an ACER Aspire, 2-core AMD, 3GB RAM, with a Seagate 1 Tb drive, running XP Pro SP3. Problem: After several hours, CHKDSK seems stuck at 73% in Stage 4. Question: What happens if I reboot - any way to return to a usable state?

More about : seagate drive stuffed

October 29, 2011 5:13:18 AM

Somebody will probably flame me for this, but you are desperate.

Boot the computer with the XP CD. Ignore the first "press 'r' to repair" using the repair console, and choose to install XP. Later it will find your XP and again offer to repair it, here you click to repair it.
Proceed to start a repair install of XP. After 'setup' copies all the files it wants into your drive, at the point that setup is going to restart the computer in 15 seconds, let it restart or just press the enter key and get it over with. Pay attention to this next part carefully.

After setup (or you) cause the computer to restart, be prepared and actively doing the next part before the computer even has a chance to start up again.

Here's where you intercede. Poke (not hold) the F8 key rapidly to force the boot choices menu to come up. Keep poking until the boot choices menu screen shows.
When it shows, you will see the #1 item is XP repair/upgrade (or something similar) and the next choice is the XP that you have been running all this time. Choose the second choice of your known XP using the cursor keys to make the selection choice and then press the enter key.

If it shows the full boot menu, which includes many things to do, choose "Start Windows Normally" and the next screen will offer the choice of what to start, here choose your normal XP.

You are back in Windows.

Now you have a small mess to clean up and you MUST do this first item of the cleanup or suffer the consequences of being stubborn or lazy or both.

Start>Control panel>System>Advanced>Startup and Recovery>Settings>Default operating system

Change to "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" (or whatever it has for your normal XP system). If it is left on XP setup/repair or whatever... you are doomed next time you start your computer to having a repair installed that you cannot abort (it will just re-start again and again if you force terminate it).

Click OK, (danger now over, no longer doomed on restart) and then go back to the same area but this time click the Edit button in the Default operating system area.

Your Boot.ini file will be showing in notepad.
Either maximize notepad or stretch it out so there is no word wrap.
Carefully, delete the line concerning the repair/upgrade process.

Click File and then save and then exit notepad.

Now open Windows Explorer. Look at the boot drive's root folder. There will be 2 folders with dollar signs in front of them and they may be blue in color. Delete them.

Cleanup completed.


Edit:
I offer this method as OP says he tried everything, so I'll assume he tried everything that could be found about the subject, but all failed.

About that Seagate 1TB drive. Look at it. If it has the numbers 7200.11 or .12 or .13 it could be in for a firmware failure. 7200.11 drives were the worst. See more info and firmware update
HERE
Score
0
October 29, 2011 3:33:01 PM

tigsounds said:
Somebody will probably flame me for this, but you are desperate.

Boot the computer with the XP CD. Ignore the first "press 'r' to repair" using the repair console, and choose to install XP. Later it will find your XP and again offer to repair it, here you click to repair it.
Proceed to start a repair install of XP. After 'setup' copies all the files it wants into your drive, at the point that setup is going to restart the computer in 15 seconds, let it restart or just press the enter key and get it over with. Pay attention to this next part carefully.

After setup (or you) cause the computer to restart, be prepared and actively doing the next part before the computer even has a chance to start up again.

Here's where you intercede. Poke (not hold) the F8 key rapidly to force the boot choices menu to come up. Keep poking until the boot choices menu screen shows.
When it shows, you will see the #1 item is XP repair/upgrade (or something similar) and the next choice is the XP that you have been running all this time. Choose the second choice of your known XP using the cursor keys to make the selection choice and then press the enter key.

If it shows the full boot menu, which includes many things to do, choose "Start Windows Normally" and the next screen will offer the choice of what to start, here choose your normal XP.

You are back in Windows.

Now you have a small mess to clean up and you MUST do this first item of the cleanup or suffer the consequences of being stubborn or lazy or both.

Start>Control panel>System>Advanced>Startup and Recovery>Settings>Default operating system

Change to "Microsoft Windows XP Professional" (or whatever it has for your normal XP system). If it is left on XP setup/repair or whatever... you are doomed next time you start your computer to having a repair installed that you cannot abort (it will just re-start again and again if you force terminate it).

Click OK, (danger now over, no longer doomed on restart) and then go back to the same area but this time click the Edit button in the Default operating system area.

Your Boot.ini file will be showing in notepad.
Either maximize notepad or stretch it out so there is no word wrap.
Carefully, delete the line concerning the repair/upgrade process.

Click File and then save and then exit notepad.

Now open Windows Explorer. Look at the boot drive's root folder. There will be 2 folders with dollar signs in front of them and they may be blue in color. Delete them.

Cleanup completed.


Edit:
I offer this method as OP says he tried everything, so I'll assume he tried everything that could be found about the subject, but all failed.

About that Seagate 1TB drive. Look at it. If it has the numbers 7200.11 or .12 or .13 it could be in for a firmware failure. 7200.11 drives were the worst. See more info and firmware update
HERE

Score
0
Related resources
October 29, 2011 3:44:30 PM

BWK said:
I have tried all the tricks for fixing "NTLDR missing" - and now am trying CHKDSK as 2nd-last resort. 2nd-last, because it might "fix" things it shouldn't, so I would have to replace all the s/w - going back 10 years, as last resort. Perhaps I have to do this anyway, either to reformat or replace the HD. This PC is an ACER Aspire, 2-core AMD, 3GB RAM, with a Seagate 1 Tb drive, running XP Pro SP3. Problem: After several hours, CHKDSK seems stuck at 73% in Stage 4. Question: What happens if I reboot - any way to return to a usable state?



Really appreciate your suggestion, you're right that I am a little desperate. Since I've already had trouble with my SP2 XP Pro disk, does it matter with your suggestion that it's incompatible with SP3? If so, any way to get a sensible (set of) CD(s) with SP3, on another new (Win 7) machine? BTW I do have all data that may be relevant on an external 1 Tb drive.

Since you obviously know about Seagate probs., does the following suggest a HD problem - after NTLDR errors first appeared, following an overnight reboot by Live Uodate (curses!) i was able to bypass the error by using F12 (not F8?) to go into the boot menu - somehow merely doing this gave the correct boot data for Win XP startup. Checking system log showed 5 occasions in 3 months where there was a fatal error in the swap file - the only fatal errors appearing.
Score
0

Best solution

October 30, 2011 1:09:28 AM



Since I'm having you boot the computer from the CD, it doesn't matter what SP is installed, setup hasn't looked that far. It's only setting up the drive to take a repair install, which includes perfecting the boot system, which also by quirk of necessity, fixes your boot problem of the missing ntldr.

The idea is to not let setup do it's thing to your XP install. You're only borrowing it's ability to fix your boot files. If setup is allowed to actually start the repair then you are in it for the long haul and whatever SP is on the CD is what you will end up with as added SP's get over-written by what setup puts on the hard drive in the repair process. Thus I said to be poking the F8 key when the computer restarts to take control away from setup and return it back to you. Part of the cleanup process is to permanently keep setup from running. If you had a truly corrupted XP system, the the repair install would be a benefit, but it seems your boot process is all that is bad now, so the fix is much less than full repair.

About the Seagate 7200.11 drives...

The drives had a bad self-test routine in them that got replicated to the full production run back in 2009 (or there-a-bouts).

What happens: Any one of three things went wrong.

One day the drive just isn't found anymore by the BIOS, it reports no drive present.
The drive is found, but the drive reports it's size as zero.
The drive is found but has a password (not really, but it claims it has one).

All of these problems disabled the drive but it was not fatal, if you could attach specialized equipment to the drive and repair the code in firmware. One totally successful device that handled these drives was HD Doctor, by Salvation Data of China. I had 8 of those drives that were purchased at the same time and lost 5 drives in a 3 day period (it took about a month to go bad). I purchased the HD Doctor Suite and it fixed the drives in about 2 clicks of the mouse. Back then Seagate had no firmware update, and actually denied anything was wrong with the drives so most people were just out of luck. If you have a Seagte 7200.11 go to the link I provided and run the serial number checker they have to see if your drive is in the range of those that were bad. They are still dying because the problem is dependent on how many times the drive was turned on (It decremented a counter each startup until it got to zero and then trouble), so some drives that rarely get turned off can still be out there and vulnerable to failure. If your drive is on the list, perform the firmware update now before it is too late.

You asked about the swap file. I run my swap file on a different physical drive from my system and have never had any problems with it. Yours... best guess why it went bad 5 times in 3 months.
Share
November 6, 2011 8:29:30 PM

Well, had to perform the final stage repair after all. I could not get out of the CHKDSK loop except if in Repair Mode, and then could not reformat the entire dislk (the 2 MB repair partition was not accessible). It finally turned out that this small partition had a problem immediately recognized by the DOS Version of Seagate's disk tools. The disk was under warranty so will be replaced! But I have had to treinstall everything after all....

This Seagate Disk was NOT one of the listed series that had frequent faults according to the Serial No checker.
Score
0
November 6, 2011 8:29:48 PM

Best answer selected by BWK.
Score
0
!