Bios showing cpu temp at 85 celcius when programs show 45!!!!!

my bios shows the cpu temp at 85 degrees (it only shows one temp) in the bios, but when i run 3 different programs that check the temps, all three show all 4 cores at around 45 degrees.

i have a gigabyte ep45-ud3p mobo, and a core 2 quad 2.83 cpu. i am using the stock cooler and as5 paste (i wiped off the paste that came on it before applying the as5). i do have a sunbeam core-contact freezer on the way.

nothing is overclocked because it wont boot up if i change any setting (by even 1) in the bios. i have no idea what could be causing this either.

and ideas on fixing this??


thanks,

- morgan

i forgot to mention that the computer runs perfectly fine.
8 answers Last reply
More about bios showing temp celcius programs show
  1. Try HardwareMonitor, or HardwareMonitorPro:
    http://www.cpuid.com/hwmonitor.php
    http://www.cpuid.com/hwmonitorpro.php
    They should show you both sets of temps:

    The BIOS temp you are seeing is from one of a pair of temps sensors hooked up to your IT8718 LPCIO (low pin count input/output) chip, which handles your fan control, legacy ports, and a staggering amount of other things; the core temps come from on the CPU die, off the cores themselves... We believe (but are not positive, as solid info is rarer than hen's teeth) that the MOBO sensor titled "CPU" is somewhere in the Vreg cluster under the socket; and the one variously labeled 'board', 'motherboard' or 'northbridge' is near the inner end of the first PCIe slots... It is unusual to see that wide a temperature variation (I have, currently, about a 4°C differential - and I'm 'under water', which usually causes a wide variance), but not that unusual to see one or the other of these sensors 'broken' or 'stuck'... Overall, I wouldn't lose any sleep over it - the core temps are mainly what you want to monitor, and the new cooler will bring them down, pretty much guaranteed!

    If you'd like a working overclock for your board, I can give you one, but will need:
    CPU model #
    RAM make, model #, and DIMM count
    MOBO revision #: 1.0, 1.1, or 1.6...
  2. Quote:
    Try HardwareMonitor, or HardwareMonitorPro:
    http://www.cpuid.com/hwmonitor.php
    http://www.cpuid.com/hwmonitorpro.php
    They should show you both sets of temps:
    The BIOS temp you are seeing is from one of a pair of temps sensors hooked up to your IT8718 LPCIO (low pin count input/output) chip, which handles your fan control, legacy ports, and a staggering amount of other things; the core temps come from on the CPU die, off the cores themselves... We believe (but are not positive, as solid info is rarer than hen's teeth) that the MOBO sensor titled "CPU" is somewhere in the Vreg cluster under the socket; and the one variously labeled 'board', 'motherboard' or 'northbridge' is near the inner end of the first PCIe slots... It is unusual to see that wide a temperature variation (I have, currently, about a 4°C differential - and I'm 'under water', which usually causes a wide variance), but not that unusual to see one or the other of these sensors 'broken' or 'stuck'... Overall, I wouldn't lose any sleep over it - the core temps are mainly what you want to monitor, and the new cooler will bring them down, pretty much guaranteed!

    If you'd like a working overclock for your board, I can give you one, but will need:
    CPU model #
    RAM make, model #, and DIMM count
    MOBO revision #: 1.0, 1.1, or 1.6...



    thanks for the info. hardware monitor was one of the programs i used to get the 45 degree temp. i do feel a lot better about it and yea, hopefully the new cooler will bring down the temps.

    a working overclock would be awesome!

    cpu: Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 model#: BX80569Q9550
    ram: 4gb (2x2) patriot viper DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) model #: PVS24G6400LLKN
    the mobo revision is 1.6

    again thanks,

    - morgan
  3. A lot of this is 'canned' - so if you've seen parts of it before, skip ahead!

    GA-EP45-UD3P
    Intel Q9550 1333FSB x8.5mult 2.83GHz .85-1.3625V
    Patriot Viper PVS24G6400LLKN 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 memory: 4-4-4-12-2t nominal 2.1v

    If you haven't yet done it, pull out two sticks, start with a BIOS' "Load Optimized Defaults"

    This is nVidia 'SLI' EPP certified memory; at this point, I want you to go into the BIOS to confirm that the "load Optimized" actually read, and set the RAM correctly:

    Check that, on the "MB Intelligent Tweaker(M.I.T.)" page:

    "(G)MCH Frequency Latch" is set to "333"
    "System Memory Multiplier (SPD)" is set to "2.40B"
    under
    >>>>> Standard Timing Control
    "CAS", "tRCD", and "tRP" are set to "4"
    "tRAS" is set to "12"
    and, lower down, under
    ******** Mother Board Voltage Control ********
    >>> DRAM
    "DRAM Voltage" is reading "2.1"

    Assuming this went well, and everything is set for the RAM...

    Before we start ramping things up, I want to teach you a new skill involving the BIOS: Do the <DEL> at the boot to enter the BIOS; notice, at the bottom, the <F11> "Save CMOS to BIOS" - hit this, and you should get a menu that will show a number (the count varies by BIOS) of empty 'slots', each of which will store an entire set of BIOS parameters, to be re-loaded from the corresponding <F12> "Load CMOS from BIOS"; this is a wonderful overclocker's feature. What I do with it, is to save my 'baseline' working parameters, so if I change something that 'irritates' the board, and forces a reset of all the parameters to defaults, or, even worse, get so screwed up I need to do a 'clear CMOS', I can get back to my starting point with no effort, and without having to remember 85 separate settings! Another thing it prevents is two hours' troubleshooting, having forgotten a change to a crucial parameter - like, "wait a minute - didn't I have the Trd at seven?!" It's pretty self-explanatory, and I always urge people to start right away by taking the time to give the 'slots' names that mean something: in two hours, "Try2" and "Try3" will not be very helpful, but "450@+10MCH" and "450@+15MCH" will! Another use is for 'green' settings; overclocks, as a rule, do not 'play well' with green features, such as 'down-clocking' and 'down-volting'; with the storage slots, you can set up one profile, say "Green", with all the settings at 'stock' values, and all the 'green' features enabled; another, say "Balls2Wall" with a full overclock, and all the 'green' stuff turned off... Another neat feature of this 'slot' system is, for most BIOS, the mechanism itself will keep track of which ones have booted successfully, and how many times (up to, I believe, a max of five)!


    On the "Advanced BIOS Features" page:

    "CPU Enhanced Halt (C1E)" to "Disabled"
    "C2/C2E State Support" to "Disabled"
    "C4/C4E State Support" to "Disabled"
    "CPU Thermal Monitor 2 (TM2)" to "Enabled"
    "CPU EIST Function" to "Disabled"
    "Virtualization Technology" to "Enabled" - this allows use of Win7's fantastic VirtualXp feature...
    "Full Screen LOGO Show" to "Disabled"

    On the "Integrated Peripherals" page:

    Your manual shows "Legacy USB storage detect", but later BIOS say "USB Storage Function" - either way, set to "Disabled"

    On the "Power Management Setup" page:

    "ACPI Suspend Type" to "S1(POS)" (for now...)
    "HPET Support" to "Enabled"
    "HPET Mode" to whichever OS type you're running - "32-bit" if an x86 version, "64-bit" if an x64 version...

    On the "MB Intelligent Tweaker(M.I.T.)" page:

    "Robust Graphics Booster" to "Auto"
    "CPU Clock Ratio" to "8"
    "Fine CPU Clock Ratio" to ".5"
    "CPU Frequency" - this one can't be set, it's calculated, and will change when we set the next few items...

    ******** Clock Chip Control ********
    >>>>> Standard Clock Control

    "CPU Host Clock Control" to "Enabled"
    "CPU Host Frequency (Mhz)" to "401"
    "PCI Express Frequency (Mhz)" to "100" (not auto...)
    "C.I.A.2" to "Disabled"

    ******** DRAM Performance Control ********
    "Performance Enhance" to "Standard"
    "Extreme Memory Profile (X.M.P.)" to "Disabled"
    "(G)MCH Frequency Latch" to "400"
    "System Memory Multiplier (SPD)" to "2.0D"

    "(G)MCH Frequency Latch" which we mostly refer to as a 'strap', is the reason we used a 401 clock instead of a nice even 400: the 'straps' are sets of northbridge timings - much like memory latencies, the faster you go, the 'looser' the timings have to be... There are four straps, corresponding to the Intel FSB ratings: 200 (800FSB), 266 (1066FSB), 333 (1333FSB), and 400 (1600FSB - Intel actually does make a 1600 FSB CPU - the QX9775 - but, I think, it's over $1500 a pop!); each strap has its own set of available memory multipliers (ratios). The 2.0 we used (which is actually an 1:1 bus to bus ratio) is available only on the 333 and 400 strap. Anyway, the strap latencies, for some northbridges, don't 'kick in' until one over the selected strap; so,in other words, setting the clock to 401 guarantees that we're getting the 400 latencies/timings...

    "Memory Frequency (Mhz)" - again, can't be set, it's calculated...
    "MCH Core" to 1.200V"
    & "DRAM Voltage" to "2.100V" (this should have been done by the earlier "Load Optimized", but needs to be checked...

    And that should do it!

    I should point out that getting two reboots in a row here is perfectly normal behavior; it seems that, when you change certain settings (and we don't exactly know which ones - the only sure one I know is Trd - if you change it, I think you get the 'twin' reboot) it boots once to 'see where it's at', recalculates its remaining 'auto' settings, saves them, and then boots again. Three reboots in a row, however, usually indicates that the board was 'given indigestion' by your settings, and is going back to defaults. This sometimes goes astray, and it doesn't get back into proper operation - for example, at this point, mine will sometimes 'lock' itself into 111MHz x a six multiplier - and take a week to do a whole boot - that's time to do a CMOS reset, and use your 'stored' <F12> profile to get back to where you were...

    Good luck!

    Bill
  4. hey,

    i finally got the time to go in and set everything.
    thanks alot man! it worked beautifully.

    when i went back and checked the memory settings, the load optimized didn't read the mem correctly, so i had to change it manually.
    i did the green save with these settings, and overclocked settings you gave on a diff slot.

    the overclock def bumped up the temps according to hwmonitor, so i'm going to hold off running it with these settings till the cooler gets here. they went from 40ish to 60is degrees. i wouldnt wanna kill my newly built computer

    - morgan
  5. Oh yeah - definitely want a cooler (any cooler!) other than Intel's 'rotary postage stamp...

    Have fun!

    Bill
  6. thanks,

    the one i ordered finally came in. its the sunbeam core contact freezer i was talking about earlier. that thing is huge!! it was kind of a pain in the ass to install because it fit so close to the northbridge. i got it in though. the cores never go above 55 now; even under the prime 95 torture test!

    i highly recommend this cooler to anyone looking to upgrade. a little difficult to install as are most good coolers (that i read about), but i didnt have to take the mobo out, and it cools very well. all 4 cores idol at around 34c and 45-55 under load!
  7. Glad it's 'cookin' for ya'... I've tried a number of different manufacturer's coolers, and the one thing they all had in common: the mounts sucked!
  8. yea, true. the mount for this one actually isnt that bad, but the north bridge is so close to the mount that it took a million tries to get the cooler lined up with the mount. there's prob only an 1/8 of an inch to work with. it being in my case didnt help any.
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