Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Have I Fried My Motherboard?

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
November 17, 2009 2:58:06 AM

Recently I was doing soe major work inside my PC. I did lots of re-wiring, and I eneded up taking off and putting back on my cooler and cpu. Now, putting the cooler on (Scythe Mugen 2) is a 2 and a half hour process for me, and the only way I am willing to take it off again is in a last resort. Basically, after I was ready to put my computer back together I tried turning it on, and nothing. It did the little sucessful post beep, and the led lights on my GPU turned of for half a second, before failing. I then turned on and off my PSU, but I wouldnt even get as far as the post beep and flickering lights, nothing at all happened. Then I unpuggged and plugged back in my power cable, only to get the first reaction once more. This seems to persist no matter how many times I do it.
When I was rewiring my case, I ended up stretching and pulling some PSU cords pretty hard to get them to fit, so that may have been a problem.
In short, I wasn't the gentlest with my hardware, and I think I may be seeing the consequences of my actions with a fried mobo, or broken PSU ATX power cable. Or something like that.
Any thoughts?

Motherboard is a
Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3R
CPU - C2Q Q9400
PSU - Antec Earthwatts 650W
Case - Cooler Master CM 690

More about : fried motherboard

a c 177 V Motherboard
November 17, 2009 2:32:45 PM

Time for a 'strip-down':

Mind you, there are two ways to do this: you can do it either in or out of the case. The advantages and drawbacks:in the case is easier and faster, but will not find case-related problems, like shorts from extra, mispositioned standoffs, or ground plane problems; out of the case takes longer, and you may run into 'reach' problems - power supply cables and front panel power switch headers may not be long enough; for the power supply, it's usually just a matter of removing four screws to temorarily relocate it; for the power switch, you can just do this (carefully):

You only need to short the pins momentarily - that's all the power switch does...Out of the case also affords you an easy opportunity to 'flip' the board to check your heatsink/fan attachment setup, to be sure all the pins are fully seated, locked, and not cracked... If you do the out of the case, you need to lay the board on a non-conductive surface: the box the MOBO came in is ideal; but - the foam pad it came with, and the bag it was in are not - being 'antistat', they are somewhat conductive, and may induce problems...

Another item worth mention at this point is case speakers: if you haven't got one - get one!
http://www.cwc-group.com/casp.html
A lot of people operate under the misaprehension that the 'diagnostic beeps' should come through the speakers attached to their sound-card/chip - not so! Your three hundred dollar Altec-Lansings won't do you any good here - you have to have a case speaker attached to the front panel header, and, often by this point, it's the only diagnostic info you'll have to go on...

The standard 'strip-down':

Power down at PSU switch
remove everything except
CPU and heatsink/fan (check carefully that the fan retaining pins are fully inserted, completely locked, and not cracked)
one stick of RAM, in slot closest to CPU
video card and monitor connector (if more than one PCIe slot, again, in slot closest to CPU)
all power plugs - 20+4 or 24, 2x2 or 2x4 ATX power, graphics card power
case speaker and power switch connectors
keyboard (don't need a mouse at this point)
place jumper on RST_CMOS pins
remove jumper from RST_CMOS pins
power up at PSU switch
power up by depressing case power switch (or shorting the 'power' pins...)
If you get video, enter BIOS with <DEL> (may need a <TAB> to get to POST screen, if 'splash' screen is enabled)
Select and execute "Load Optimized Defaults" - save and exit, reboot
power down
reinsert other components, one at a time, testing each time after addition...


m
0
l
November 17, 2009 6:51:15 PM

The problem here is that Im not really sure if I have a case speaker. Does the CM 690 or the EP45-UD3R have one?
Also, that part about placing the jumber on CMOS pins then removing it: does that mean that I should just tough the pins with a metal object? And shouldnt this be done when the power is on?
And Im not really sure what you mean by depressing or shorting the power pins. Where are the power pins, and how do I do whatever it was that you were describing?
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 156 V Motherboard
November 17, 2009 9:26:32 PM

System (case) speaker - That's what makes the single short beep of a successful POST. Your motherboard does not have one and I am not familiar with your case.

The power pins are the two pins on the front panel header that the case power switch goes to.

If you do the "standard" stripdown that bilbat refers to, and your system still does not work, try this -
Breadboarding:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/262730-31-breadboardi...

If you are down to just the PSU, motherboard, and CPU & HSF and you still get silence, one of those three components are bad.
m
0
l
November 17, 2009 9:43:56 PM

I am not sure if yiur are familiar with the 'paper clip trick' or not, but I tried it. Just in case you aren't, its a way of jumping my PSU. I put the paperclip in a 'u' like form, then stuck the two ends in the geren and black cable connectors on my power cable. Btw, I think my case has a speaker because I always hear the little noise when something boots up, and when I don't have my RAM installed, it makes the appropriate noise as well.
Back to the point, after jump starting my PSU, I heard the noise that indicates its trying to startup, but then it failed. If I left the paperclip in, it would repeat this action. Now I know something is faulty, here is my question.
Is it my motherboard or PSU that is at fault
m
0
l
November 18, 2009 12:02:42 AM

bilbat said:
you need to lay the board on a non-conductive surface: the box the MOBO came in is ideal; but - the foam pad it came with, and the bag it was in are not - being 'antistat', they are somewhat conductive, and may induce problems...


I'm curious to hear why it is not a good idea to put an electrical component on an antistatic bag. I would think this would not conduct electricity though maybe it just protects components on the inside of the bag?
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
November 18, 2009 12:21:06 AM

The outside of an antistatic bag is coated with a conductive material on the outside as bilbat said. That is so a charge does not build up in a localize spot, it "spreads" the charge out. The resitivity is in the Megohms per square in. It would be like tying all exposed electical point with a 1 -> 100 Mohm resistor.

You should be able to turn the bag inside out as the inside should be non-conductive.
m
0
l
November 18, 2009 12:39:51 AM

RetiredChief said:
The outside of an antistatic bag is coated with a conductive material on the outside as bilbat said. That is so a charge does not build up in a localize spot, it "spreads" the charge out. The resitivity is in the Megohms per square in. It would be like tying all exposed electical point with a 1 -> 100 Mohm resistor.

You should be able to turn the bag inside out as the inside should be non-conductive.


Gotcha, and I had a feeling as such. Thanks for making it more clear.
m
0
l
!