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Water cooling a core i7

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August 31, 2009 9:06:41 PM

I want to water cool my core i7 cpu. I have water cooled in the past but only with 1/2" tubbing. my question is, what are the differences in using 1/4" tubbing versus 1/2" or 3/8"? I know that the bigger the tubbing the faster the flow rate, but does it make any difference in temperatures? I've read (don't remember where) that using bigger tubbing is actually bad, beacuse the water passes to fast over the water block so does not collect all the heat. is that true? i like the idea of using 1/4" tubbing becuase it does not kink as easy and onced finnished it looks alot cleaner than big tubes running everywhere, plus it can fit in smaller cases.

one more thing.
i have all the components for my setup except a radiator. I was looking at a koolance 3x120mm but its aluminum will i have a problem with it and my copper water block? the reason i ask is because i have only used danger den kits. but the koolance would sit very nice on top of my case with minimal modding. this the rad i was looking at.

More about : water cooling core

August 31, 2009 10:29:35 PM

The fact is I would not go with less then 3/8 tubing, and go with Tygon and you won't have to worry about kinks. If you get a swiftech 655 pump with the flow adjustment on it you can test your ideas on if less flow rate will help cool your components better. I recomend no less then 3/8 and with rather use 1/2 OD tubing from Tygon.

You will have no problems if you use a cooling fuild like Fluild XP Ultra(make sure it is the Ultra Kind) and mixing copper and Aluminum. I ran it in my loop when I had a Aluminum Radiator and Copper blocks and after a year when I tore it down noticed no problems.

Heres my set up....







Heres a video of my rig,




I have the Swiftech 655 pump turned up to 4 out of 5 and it runs great. I have turned it down to 2-4 and have not seen better temps then what I get on 4, and these are with 1/2 Tygon lines. My Phenom II 940 is at 3.6 ghz and nice and chilly.

Hope this helped, and good luck with cooling your I7
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September 1, 2009 1:53:23 AM

1/4" ID tubing is too small and restrictive (as in when kinked, which happens easily). Get 1/2" or better.

Quote:

You will have no problems if you use a cooling fuild like Fluild XP Ultra(make sure it is the Ultra Kind) and mixing copper and Aluminum. I ran it in my loop when I had a Aluminum Radiator and Copper blocks and after a year when I tore it down noticed no problems.

PLEASE DO NOT recommend running a mixed loop EVER!

Most pro WCers Lol@ Koolance stuff.

Here is a better quality and cheaper rad:
http://www.jab-tech.com/Swiftech-MCR320-QP-K-Triple-120...

More 3x120 rads: http://www.jab-tech.com/120mm-Triple-c-258.html

Swiftech MCR320-QP-K Triple 120mm Radiator $52.

Conumdrum said:
Us guys have done the WC thing, there are basics you gotta know. Maybe this long rewritten and modified thing will help. Most say OMG TY, some don’t, they usually just don’t ever reply.
.......................................
CPU HS $65
GPU HS and air HS for vram and mosfets $95, full cover block, $100-$200
Radiator $60 min, up to $130
Pump $65 +
Resiviour $25
Hose, some barbs and clamps etc (min $25, more like $35)
Fans $15-30

I went top notch and spent close to $600 to cool my CPU and GPU. You can do it for less, but a CPU only loop is $250 or so, add a GPU, add $100. If your looking at an i7 and a BIG GPU, start thinking about a big rad, possibly two rads, or even TWO loops.
First you gotta learn about WC. It's not like walking into Best Buy.
Spend a while reading this info, get a feel for what your getting into and learn.
It’s not 'Roket Science', but you need to know the basics and the lingo as a beginner.
You should spend a few hours on the listed sites reading threads, guides and more. It's how YOU learn. I can recommend the best stuff, but there are things only reading and participating on forums will ya learn anything. You don’t have to join all the forums. But reading ALL the WC stickies and many threads that interest you is important. A thread might be 50 replies long, and 15 of those replies might be what you needed to ‘PASS THE TEST’. Remember, once the $500 of goodies show up on your doorstep you’re on your own.
For your benefit please spend a few days reading a LOT. It took me a while; I was big into Air over clocking and started to read about water-cooling. I made my decision to water-cool. THREE months later I made my first purchase of parts. Yes it took me that long and I have built a few systems and always just fine.

Don't expect miracles or SUPER DOOPER over clocks. Your temps with a good WC rig will be better than you could of got on air, guaranteed. What you will get is a quiet system that can handle OC to the max of your hardware IF you buy quality and buy smart. And minor maintenance too, a bonus for the water cooler.

Also while there please read on case mods etc. The radiators do NOT fit in many cases. Reading up on pumps and hose routing, wire management and other things are important. Google your planned case and the word water-cooled in one line. You might get lucky. Look here too…. http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=22...
...........................
2009/2010 Heat thoughts:
With the advent of the HOT i7 and bigger dual chip GPU's, it has changed. A 220 size MIN rad for an i7, you want big over clocks, better go 320 sized rad.
Expect a i7 at 4.1 to be putting out close to 250 watts. Using the radiator testing charts, a PA 120.3 with medium fans on high you’ll get a Delta T of 5C, very good. Some have suggested a GTX295 puts out about 250 watts of heat, possibly more like 280 under load. You try and put both of those on a 120x3 radiator the CPU will not over clock at all, it will be very very unhappy. You want to learn more about heat load and the all important measurement, Delta T, read up in the stickies I provided.
2007/2008 Old stuff heat thoughts:
For the old Q6600 CPUs and the old 4870 and GTX280 cards.
IF you just cool your CPU and your NB if you want, you can get by with a 120.2 sized radiator (RAD). And MAYBE fit in inside depending on your mod skillz. You want to cool your GPU too, you'll need a 120.3 sized rad, and it probably won't fit inside. The rear external rad really works great. No matter what your adding 10lbs to your PC.
…………………………………………………………
Just general info what you should do once a year to keep your WC at 100%:
Cleaning a loop, not a new loop: I do this once a year, I drain and refill at 6 months, the next time I do this……
Wash hands very well, getting rid of hand oils.
For pumps and blocks, fittings, clamps, acrylic res/block parts.... not hose, tear it to smallest pieces, put in a bowl, heat water up not to boiling add 10% vinegar, when hot, pour over parts. Rinse in 10 min or so. Put aside.
The blocks will probably have some black oxidation. Take the copper parts out of the pile of parts you took out of the water. Dry well and pour ketchup on them, and set aside. Only the copper parts need this.
Rad cleaning: fill with very almost boiling hot water. Let sit 10 minutes, drain half out and shake for 5 min. Repeat till liquid is clean. You can pour it in a clean bowl and inspect the water if you like.
All the pump, block, fittings, and clamps, inspect, get in the tiniest corners with a tooth brush. Kind of meditative, time consuming, you learn a lot about o-ring size, how it all feels. It’s very relaxing with some mellow jazz in the background. Run a rag using a coat hanger and dish soap through the tubing, rinse well. I always consider replacing my hose every year. Plasticizers leach out, the tubing isn’t as flexible. Consider it a ‘Hobby Cost’.
Rinse all the parts and hose with distilled, dry then really dry with an air compressor (nice extra step to get rid of water spots). Don’t need to dry the inside of the hose.
Now on to the copper parts, they should have been soaking an hour or two. A toothbrush and ketchup should clean much of the oxidation. It probably won’t be like new, but pretty darn good. Rinse, dry, and blow the parts.
That’s it.
………………………………………………………
Benching software and such is very varied. I use these for each purpose:
These are pretty standard and used by many.
Monitoring the PC temps overall: HW monitor aka hardware monitor
CPUZ for CPU info
GPUZ for GPU info
CPU only: Real Temp
GPU only: ATI Tool, I have a Nivida GTX280, so it works on Nvidia

Loading/benching tools:
CPU loaders: Prime95 and OCCT
GPU Loaders: ATI Tool and the best one is Furmark, nothing pushes the GPU harder right now.
Benching for overall graphics/gaming performance is 3DMark06
……………………………………………………………
Guides
http://forums.extremeoverclocking. [...] p?t=282232 Pretty up to date info and buying guide
http://gilgameshreviews.com/index. [...] s&catid=40 Another good guide
http://forums.extremeoverclocking. [...] p?t=312743 What to do once all the stuff is in the door
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forum [...] p?t=223835 Many build logs on MANY cases, great learning tool.

My latest rig:
http://www.ocforums.com/showthread.php?t=604016

Forums
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/index.php? Not a noob site, but great stickies
http://www.ocforums.com/ My fav, good peeps, know their stuff, less hardcore
http://www.over-clock.com/ivb/inde [...] opic=20277 A GREAT Europe site
http://www.overclock.net/water-cooling/ Decent site

Tests on equipment, not reviews, truly scientific tests
http://translate.google.com/transl [...] n&ie=UTF-8 Info on rad testing
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forum [...] p?t=220593 More rad testing
http://skinneelabs.com/ Host for Martins lab and some newer tests
http://www.skinneelabs.com/MartinsLiquidLab/ Test results, very technical


Stores
http://www.dangerden.com
http://www.petrastechshop.com/
http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/
http://www.jab-tech.com/
http://www.performance-pcs.com
http://www.frozencpu.com/
……………………………………………………………

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/253958-29-shadow-wate...

Related resources
September 1, 2009 2:15:07 AM

Well I didn't really recomend he run a mixed loop, however he said he wanted the Koolance Rad for a reason, and I gave him a cooling product that he could run a mixed loop with that would be trouble free, from my own personal experience of running it for a year with the Fluid XP Ultra, without any damage to my blocks or Radiator. All I had to do is rinse them out with hot distilled water, they were very clean.

I have to agree with the comment about koolance Aluminum Radiators not being very good, I almost went with them when I built my custom case because I liked the finished look of them, but decided not to and went with a stealth 320 from the Den. Koolance has come out with all copper Rad's but they are more expensive then the Aluminum ones they have. I can't laugh at all of koolances parts, because I ordered Quick disconnects for all my lines from Koolance, and they are very sharp and work very well.
September 1, 2009 10:09:05 AM

Most of Koolance's products are like Alfa Romeo cars, focuses on form over substances. This is also one of the reasons why XSers like them so much :lol: 
September 1, 2009 3:42:28 PM

like i said i am not new to water cooling. i was just wondering if the smaller tubbing would make a difference in temperatures . my original plane was to use a black ice estreme III radiator, but the koolance just looks really nice on my p180 case. looks like modding for me.
September 1, 2009 4:08:16 PM

You can go with Koolance, they do make All copper Rad, and you can buy the cover for it also, it will just be more expensive. When I priced out the all copper tripple with the nice and neat cover it came to almost $200 bucks I think. The smaller cooling will make a difference in temps, but not the way you want them to if you want cooler temps. I went with the Swiftech 655 with the flow control on it and the black Ice stealth this time around and I am very happy with it. If you go this rought with 1/2 lines you can test you idea on the coolant pushing to fast onto the blocks just by turning down the Swiftech, if you don't get better temps then turn it back up and see what it does.

Another point on Rads, some are designed to have low air flow fans on them, and cool better if you use certain types of fans with low CFM or get fan controller and try lower and higher settings on your rad fans you install. I find that if I turn my Sythce's all the way up on my setup that it takes enough fresh air out from the front that motherboard temp rise a couple of degrees C. If I turn them down to just over half or 1600 RPM instead of full blast at 2000rpm they still cool the CPU very well and the mother board temps do not rise, nor do my Hardrive temps rise either.

Of course your resaults will vary with you case setup, but getting fan controllers and the swiftech 655 with flow control and 1/2" lines will help you figure out what cools you rig the best.

@ yomamafor1

I agree with you to a point about koolance, however like I said the Quick dissconects are a awsome product, and they work very well. If I need to break down my loop I can unplug each block or the rad, and have no leakage. Expensive, but very nice to work with. They are the only parts I went with from Koolance and the rest came from the Egg and the Den.
a b à CPUs
September 1, 2009 4:58:09 PM

ferny12345623 said:
like i said i am not new to water cooling. i was just wondering if the smaller tubbing would make a difference in temperatures . my original plane was to use a black ice estreme III radiator, but the koolance just looks really nice on my p180 case. looks like modding for me.

Impact of tubing size: http://www.ocforums.com/showthread.php?t=515368
As for who Cathar is, he was the one who designed the Storm waterblock. He knows what he's doing.
September 3, 2009 9:01:54 PM

Shadow703793 said:
Impact of tubing size: http://www.ocforums.com/showthread.php?t=515368
As for who Cathar is, he was the one who designed the Storm waterblock. He knows what he's doing.



wow!. thats great info.
thanks.
so there is no real difference in tubbing size. i can live with a 1C higher temperature using 1/4" as opposed to 1/2" tubbing. i did a test today with a danger den 500LPM pump a danger den MC-TDX water block(for core i7) and dual 120mm raditor(leftover from a aseted LCLC kit)all with 1/4" tubbing. i got great results. at stock speeds i got 27C idle and 47C load.(with prime95)it was ran for about 3 hours at full load with a difference of 1 or 2 degrees. this with a room temp of 78F. not bad at all.

a friend of mine has a similar setup on his core i7 only he uses 1/2" tubbing and a black ice pro II rad. mine was actually cooler with the smaller tubbing size.
September 3, 2009 9:11:05 PM

Is your I7 stock Ghz? What is his I7 at 2.66? Overclocked?
September 5, 2009 7:56:19 PM

medjohnson77 said:
Is your I7 stock Ghz? What is his I7 at 2.66? Overclocked?



yes my i9 920 is stock @ 2.66GHz my freinds was at 3.8GHz by for comparison it was brought back to stock speeds. also his pump is alittle weaker than mine. mine being a 500LPH and his a 350LPH pump, that could have make a difference in the temperature but not really sure.
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