Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Gigabytes P67A-UD7-B3 Sandy Bridge Overclock

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
April 13, 2011 11:48:54 PM

Hi Im new to OC and Im trying to OC my new i7 2600k
I have a Gigabyte P67A-UD7-B3

I can change the multiplier to 42x but I cant go higher then that. I would like to get to 4.5ghz . How do I change the multiplier higher??

also when I run pime95 I get 3.9ghz even though the multiplier is 42x
Im useing cup-z and real temp
April 14, 2011 2:48:18 AM

JJ Stone said:
Hi Im new to OC and Im trying to OC my new i7 2600k
I have a Gigabyte P67A-UD7-B3

I can change the multiplier to 42x but I cant go higher then that. I would like to get to 4.5ghz . How do I change the multiplier higher??

also when I run pime95 I get 3.9ghz even though the multiplier is 42x
Im useing cup-z and real temp

Start Here: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/265056-29-2600k-2500k...

This will get u asking the right questions. ;) 
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
April 14, 2011 6:17:58 AM

If you are using the stock Intel cooler that came with the CPU, stop overclocking and reset the CPU speed back to stock. You need an after-market cooler to control the increased temps from overclocking. If you've already got one, great.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 199 à CPUs
a c 145 K Overclocking
April 14, 2011 5:32:36 PM

Look here to see the 2600k running at 4.6 GHz on the stock cooler.

http://www.guru3d.com/article/asus-sabertooth-p67-tuf-r...

Here's the steps they took but I have not found it necessary to change the TDP either (in other words, ya can skip step 2).

Quote:
1 Leave baseclock for what it is right now
2 If optional in the BIOS, increase the TDP limit of your processor to 200 Watts
3 With a 2600K set your base multiplier at 34
4 And now set the per core multiplier at a maximum of your liking, we applied an MP of 46 on all four cores
5 Increase CPU voltage, though setting AUTO might work fine, we applied 1.35V
6 Make sure your processor is properly cooled (we used the stock Intel cooler and forced the fan to 70% RPM)
7 Save and Exit BIOS / UEFI


Looking at the images on that link, you can see their core temps at 65 - 72 running under P95 loads with the stock cooler.....those temps are certainly not going to bother your processor.....however, I gotta say, I have a hard time understanding them cause I have Silver Arrow, which BMR describes as "the ultimate air cooler than can be built and still fit within the constraints of an ATX motherboard and a standard computer case.", and my temps are about the same as theirs.

Max Core Temps under P95 (idle - load) 4.6004 GHz
Core 1 31 - 62
Core 2 31 - 66
Core 3 31 - 68
Core 4 31 - 65
Core Voltage (Idle) 1.040-1.048
Core Voltage (Under Load) 1.360 - 1.368

The Silver Arrow's fans are dead silent at this point so maybe at 70% the stock cooler is moving more air ?

In writing about the Silver Arrow, BNR wrote:



Quote:
It's almost ironic that coolers like this are becoming available just as processors transition to designs that may ultimately render them unnecessary; even overclocked to 5GHz, an Intel Sandy Bridge 2600K doesn't need anywhere near this level of cooling


Simply put, an expensive 3rd party cooler is completely unnecessary for cooling Sandy Bridge, at moderate overclocks the stock cooler will do just fine ..... remember "out of the box" the 2600k runs at 3.8GHz (3.4 + 0.4 turbo). In the end, it's not what cooler you're using but what temperature your CPU is when running under heavy load. I'd start by setting the fan to 70% as Guru3D folks did, then start cranking up the CPU in increments of 0.2 till ya get either get to where you wanna be or you exceed a temperature you are comfy with .... let's say 72C.

I went in 0.2 increments up to 4.8 .... I'm stable there but I don't like the voltage / temps required so still tweaking that before shooting for 5.0 .... here's my BIOS settings for 4.4 Ghz . ... I'm using a WS Revolution, which is Asus's version of the UD7 ..... you can compare the boards here but I don't know what if anything are the comparable terms used for anything that varies in the Giga's BIOS. erhaps you'll find some useful tips in the article

http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/3795/asus_p8p67_ws_rev...

AI TWEAKER
AI Overclock Tuner: Manual
BCLK/PEG Frequency: 100
Turbo Ratio: By All Cores
By All Cores: 44
Internal PLL: Auto
Memory Frequency: DDR3-1600
EPU Power Saving: Disabled

OC Tuner Cancel
DRAM Timing Control (These are my timings for my RAM, you should type in what's on the label for your RAM)
DRAM CAS Latency 7
DRAM RAD to CAS Delay 9
DRAM RAS PRE Time 8
DRAM RAS ACT Time 24
All Else Auto

CPU Power Management
CPU Ratio Auto
Enhanced Speed Step Tech Enabled
Turbo Mode Enabled
Long Duration Power Limit Auto
Long Duration Maintained Auto
Short Duration Power Limit Auto
Additional Turbo Voltage Auto
Primary Plane Current Limit Auto

Load Line Calibration: Auto
VRM Frequency: Auto
VRM Fixed Frequency Mode NA
VRM Spread Spectrum: Disabled
Phase Control: Standard
Duty Control: T-Probe
CPU Current Capability 100%
CPU Voltage: Offset (1.176)
Offset Mode Sign: +
CPU Offset Voltage: Auto
DRAM Volatge Auto (1.65)
VCCSA Voltage: Auto (0.925)
VCCIO Voltage: 1.15 (probably could leave on Auto)
CPU PLL Voltage: Auto (1,796)
PCH Voltage: Auto (1.062)
DRAM Data Reference Voltage (CHA A) Auto
DRAM CTRL Reference Voltage (CHA A) Auto
DRAM Data Reference Voltage (CHA B) Auto
DRAM CTRL Reference Voltage (CHA B) Auto
CPU Spread Spectrum Auto

ADVANCED
CPU Ratio Auto
Intel Adaptive Thermal Monitoring: Enabled
Hyper Threading Enabled
Active Processor Cores All
Limit CPUID Maximum Disabled
Execute Disable Bit Enabled
Intel Virtualization Technology Disabled
Enhanced Intel Speed Step Tech Enabled
Turbo Mode Enabled
CPU C1E Auto
CPU C3 Report Auto
CPU C6 Report Auto
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
April 14, 2011 6:15:59 PM

And once again, that Guru of 3D article didn't actually show which "stock" cooler they used. There is the version Intel shipped to reviewers with the not-really-stock tower cooler, and the real stock cooler that comes in the retail package.

Please don't ignore what I post.

Look: That is NOT the stock cooler! That is what Intel shipped to the reviewers, and what the reviewers tested as the stock cooler. You can overclock with that. The hunk of metal Intel actually includes in the retail package? Don't do it. Even with minimal over-voltage, your temps will quickly rise to the danger zone. I know this for a fact through testing with my own 2500K and the real stock cooler.
m
0
l
!