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First Time User SSD Config Help.

Tags:
  • SSD
  • Configuration
  • NAS / RAID
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
February 2, 2011 12:13:31 AM

Swapping around some parts in my computer and later on plan to get a SSD or two to speed things up a bit. I only recently started to read about RAID configurations and i'm a little confused on how a SSD comes into the picture. I have a 750G 7200 RPM HD and Id like a way to speed up some of my Game and OS boot Times with a SSD. Im not going to throw a lot of money on a SSD but may consider 2 60G or a 128G For now. I'm just curious on two things:

1. Can you RAID with 1 SSD and 1 HD (Both Internal)
2. If the top is possible, what configuration would be recommended for a Gaming/Storing a buckload of anime/zipped games on the HD?

I was thinking of just running my SSD as my main with my O.S + My games that I plan to play with my HD running seperate as a backup with my anime and games? RAID just seems more for HDD or SSDs WHEN they can store more. I'm not mistaken RAID would limit the 750G to the SSD's size which is only 128G for what im considering to buy. All this being granted, isnt placing them seperate make more sense?

More about : time user ssd config

a c 395 G Storage
February 2, 2011 12:20:29 AM

1) You shouldn't do this. The speed of the slower disk will eliminate the speed advantage of the SSD.

The most common configuration is to put OS and software on the SSD, and data on the HDD. If you have huge amounts of games that would push your OS partition over 128 GB, you could try installing some of the games on the other drive, if and only if the installation process gives you a choice of where the install should be done.

While one would assume that using RAID0 for two 64 GB SSDs would give you something faster than one 128GB SSD, it's not true these days. It would be true for HDDs, but most manufacturers of SSDs implement double-the-size by doubling the number of channels, so you get the speed improvement without implementing RAID0.
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February 2, 2011 12:23:34 AM

thanks so much for the fast reply and Ill be doing that lol. The only problem is that im a AMD/Nvidia kind of guy and my board is only Sata II (3GB/s) but honestly I think the difference of a little over a 100MB is not a biggie for me, specially since I play Games.
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Related resources
a c 395 G Storage
February 2, 2011 12:47:42 PM

I have been remiss. One of our members wrote an excellent guide to solid-state drive configuration: http://www.computing.net/howtos/show/solid-state-drive-...

If you scan the forum, there has been some discussion of equally valid alternative views to some of his points. My personal preference is to ignore step 6 and have a page file. These minor differences of opinion do not in any way tarnish the value of this guide, and only help to educate the reader.
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February 2, 2011 9:54:28 PM

WyomingKnott said:
I have been remiss. One of our members wrote an excellent guide to solid-state drive configuration: http://www.computing.net/howtos/show/solid-state-drive-...

If you scan the forum, there has been some discussion of equally valid alternative views to some of his points. My personal preference is to ignore step 6 and have a page file. These minor differences of opinion do not in any way tarnish the value of this guide, and only help to educate the reader.


Thanks for this link! I'm about to start a new build around an SSD OS drive, and that will help immensely!
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a c 288 G Storage
February 3, 2011 1:04:55 PM

After insuring that you have trim support, (set sata mode=AHCI, not IDE or raid) I suggest you keep things simple and do nothing else.

Disabling windows functions is penny wise, and pound foolish.

The page file is there for a purpose. Apps can fail if it is not there.

Windows 7 will detect the presence of a SSD and not make it eligible for defragmentation. But you will want defragmentation for your hard drives.

System restore is there for a reason. If you have a failed update or other problem, you can go back to a working system.

Indexing helps you search by reducing the number of reads you need to do; even if those reads are very fast with a ssd.

No write caching is a safety measure. It insures that i/o has been written to the device. Enabling it may marginally help performance, but it leaves you exposed to file corruption in the event of a sudden shutdown.

When you need to edit the registry file, you are exposing yourself to disaster if you do it wrong. Unknown is the effect on future maintenance.

------------------------------------bottom line-------------------------
Keep it simple; you are not smarter than Windows-7 designers.
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