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New mobo - how not to lose the drive?

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February 3, 2011 1:31:13 PM

So, my computer very charmingly decided to bite the dust. Motherboard and CPU are both dead (no idea what caused it, never had a hiccup then suddenly lost video while streaming video and when I shut down the PC then refused to boot), with RMAs hopefully on the way soon.

This leaves me in a bit of a conundrum. Yes, I did back up to an old drive a while back. But I have some new photos and a music file cleanup/total overhaul/etc that I'd strongly prefer not to lose (yes, I should have backed up after doing this, but things have been crazy busy). Not sure if new motherboard will be the exact same, but I doubt it, as I did this build 13 months ago and the model is no longer sold. Not sure Gigabyte has them just laying around to send out. I'm also contemplating just buying a new motherboard with 6gb/s SATA, so in any case, it seems probable that it won't be the same motherboard and I've been told that this means I will lose all the data on the hard drive if I try to just hook it up and boot.

So, I thought a good approach would be to buy an SSD (been wanting one anyways, and the one I have my eye on would go wonderfully with the motherboard I have my eye on) and using that as my new C drive for OS and maybe select apps, then putting in the old C as the new D drive and just deleting any system files and preserving all of the documents, music, photos, etc. This would work, yes?

Tech who has my computer told me disk imaging would be a more logical solution, but that sounds stupid to me. If he uses another machine to image the drive, then tries to restore my current drive on the new system... wouldn't the image of the system files run into the same problem of not agreeing with the new system? I'm not terribly worried about having to do a clean install, I guess reinstalling programs would be annoying but I should be able to recover my saved games and setting files from the old drive if I have it hooked up as D I would think, yeah?

Just trying to figure out the most logical way to proceed. Obviously I'm not jumping at the idea of dropping $240 on a new SSD, but the upgrade could be very worth it. Not sure if there's any other options I should consider.

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February 3, 2011 9:59:02 PM

kmadams23 said:
Tech who has my computer told me disk imaging would be a more logical solution, but that sounds stupid to me. If he uses another machine to image the drive, then tries to restore my current drive on the new system... wouldn't the image of the system files run into the same problem of not agreeing with the new system? I'm not terribly worried about having to do a clean install, I guess reinstalling programs would be annoying but I should be able to recover my saved games and setting files from the old drive if I have it hooked up as D I would think, yeah?

Quite right that imaging would have problems with a different motherboard / chipset. There are ways around it, but they can be a pain where you sit. If I were doing this, I would go with the option you described of using the old drive as D: and doing a clean install.
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a b V Motherboard
a b G Storage
February 3, 2011 11:19:11 PM

sometimes you get lucky and an existing windows drive will still be able to boot and work on a new PC. I have been lucky with intel chipsets that way, but I have been unlucky with others. Some times you can safe boot into the old drive on the new computer. Its worth a try if you are lazy, but I agree with ^ that you should do a clean install on a new drive, then install the old drive to reap the files from it. Should work fine.
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February 14, 2011 1:15:46 PM

Best answer selected by kmadams23.
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