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Restoring files from corrupt partition

Last response: in Storage
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February 5, 2011 7:55:54 AM

I'm half way through building a new pc after my old one went toes-up. I've got the central rig working (still lacking a dvd drive, alas), but unfortunately one of my old FAT IDE internal drives containing a number of backups plus my music collection has had its partition corrupted during the process (or possible because it's FAT the new system's simply not playing nice with it).

For file restoration I've found MiniTool Power Data Recovery through Filehippo, and it's managed to find and copy across almost all the files on the drive to an external HD without any trouble - but I've noticed that the music files it's copied, though they appear to take up memory space, appear to be unplayable. I've tried playing them in MediaMonkey, which just skips through them, and Audacity, which refuses to open them at all (importing them RAW gives a blank file).

I could re-rip all my CDs again but it'd be a right pain in the proverbial, and there's old podcasts and so forth on there I'd hate to lose, along with some of my own music. Is there anyone who can either recommend a way of restoring the files? Or perhaps someone who's familiar with Power Data Recovery who can point out if I'm doing something wrong?

Cheers

S
February 5, 2011 2:15:55 PM

I have had a lot of luck with RECUVA, I have actually recovered pics of of a HDD that had been wiped and formatted so it will probably. It doesnt automatically move the files, you have to move them manually but it has done me well in some pretty hairy situations.

It is made by Piriform, the same people that make Ccleaner which is another great little program.

Here is a link for it.
http://filehippo.com/download_recuva/
February 7, 2011 5:11:49 PM

Cheers for that D1RTYJU1C3 - I actually already tried RECUVA, but it didn't seem very happy with the drive, perhaps because it's FAT. I'll be sure to try it again though, since I think a lot of CCleaner.

Ta

S
!