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Does enabling hyperthreading in an OC i7 require extra voltage?

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a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2011 4:04:07 AM

For example, I have my Core i7 2600K running @ 4.7 ghz stable at around 1.33v with hyperthreading off. If I enabled HT at times, would that require a voltage boost to be stable or should it be presumed to already be stable at the same vcore?
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a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2011 4:19:33 AM

That's something we can't tell you. You would have to try it on your machine and find out.
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April 27, 2011 5:13:16 AM

As Leaps-from-Shadows said, the only way to find out is to test yourself.

I "assume" it would considering it re-enables parts of the CPU, which in turn would drive power usage up a little bit.

With hyperthreading, each core has double of some of it's resources, when those are enabled I "assume" they use a little more power.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2011 3:24:09 PM

Who would buy a 2600K and disable hyperthreading? LOL

Only you can tell us if it's stable with hyperthreading on at that voltage, how could we know, all cpu's are different???
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a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2011 4:55:41 PM

geekapproved said:
Who would buy a 2600K and disable hyperthreading? LOL

I debated whether to do that very thing for my initial Sandy Bridge purchase, before settling on the 2500K. Why? Higher stock clock speed, and 2MB extra L3 cache.
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a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2011 5:25:42 PM

If you look at the cpu charts, the 2500K actually scored slightly higher than 2600K, so the cache doesn't do much and who cares about a 100mhz speed advantage when your buying and unlocked cpu for overclocking?
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a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2011 6:04:08 PM

There are likely many instances where the extra 2MB of cache gives a boost but HyperThreading gives a penalty, canceling each other out. Those CPU charts likely didn't have listings for 2600K with HyperThreading disabled.

And in any case, I've seen quite a few overclockers who disable the HyperThreading on their 2600K so they can get higher speeds and/or lower temps.
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a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2011 6:11:04 PM

Yes I know the reason to disable HT is for higher overclock and/or better stability, but you pay $100 more for HT and then disable it, makes no sense when you could reach the same clocks/stability with a 2500K.
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a b K Overclocking
April 27, 2011 6:28:30 PM

geekapproved said:
Yes I know the reason to disable HT is for higher overclock and/or better stability, but you pay $100 more for HT and then disable it, makes no sense when you could reach the same clocks/stability with a 2500K.



What I would be doing is using it with hyperthreading when I need it, but without it when I don't. Alternating at times so to speak. Most of the time I have no need for it, so yes I admit I probably jumped the gun a bit on getting the 2600K over the 2500K
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a b K Overclocking
April 28, 2011 4:26:54 PM

But what's the point of having to disable it to get higher overclock?

Just for epeen status or do you really need to overclock your cpu that much? For what?
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