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How Dell Rapes The Innocent - Step by Step Guide Exposed!

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November 26, 2009 3:16:57 PM

Step by step guide on how my friend was raped by Dell.

1) Receive email from Dell - "keep your system updated with the latest drivers and updates."
2) Click on link.
3) Click on update all.
4) System updates all drivers.
5) Update Bios - Do you wish to update bios to version 1.1.1***? = Yes.
6) Update successful, your system must now restart to take effect, would you like to restart now? = Yes.
7) System reboots.... bios screen appears.... system switches off.... Never starts back up again.

Wait... What the?... OK...

8) Pick up the phone, call Dell.
9) Wait 45 minutes. (= Total of $9999999)
10) Finally connect to someone that tells you that your warranty has expires and that you need to pay £34.99 to be helped.
11) Take out credit card... Pay the fee.
13) Prepare to be told that your motherboard fried which was your fault and needs replacing, which will cost you £129.

[1 Day Later...]

14) Pick up the phone.
15) Call a friend who knows about computers.
16) Explain the situation.
17) Prepare to be laughed at and humiliated.
18) Cry for 5 minutes.
19) Beg friend to save your ass.
20) Accept the fact that you were raped and allow your friend to post this on Toms Hardware.

The end.
a b V Motherboard
November 26, 2009 4:23:08 PM

Sad to hear but thats nothing new and I hope your friend did learn something from that painful lesson.
a c 156 V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 1:00:32 AM

Yes. The painful lesson is "You should learn to build your own computer and be your own tech supprt."
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November 27, 2009 5:13:17 AM

What I don't understand is why they themselves never took responsabilty... It was there bugged Bios updated that fried the motherboard and with a little more google searching, I found out that anyone that tried to update useing that bios fried the motherboards.

Blah.
November 27, 2009 6:43:45 AM

are we sure its from dell? i have never seen nor have i gotten an email from dell about keeping my system up to date... i assume you just used place fillers but dell bios run with AXX format, if it says 1.1.XX then the bios are most likely not from dell to begin with. that being said if they are from dell then i gotta hand it to them, thats a good thought to skim extra profits out at the expense of the consumer.
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 7:07:51 AM

jsc said:
Yes. The painful lesson is "You should learn to build your own computer and be your own tech supprt."


Sad but true, just like the way we must be our auto-mechanic, home electrician, and carpenter. Just to keep from being screwed by anybody these days.
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 7:11:48 AM

sounds like your friend was unlucky, and #1 rule in general - if it aint broken, dont fix it
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 7:24:15 AM

jsc said:
Yes. The painful lesson is "You should learn to build your own computer and be your own tech supprt."

His system was out-of-warranty. It wouldn't matter if he had purchased a $250 ASUS retail motherboard. If he flashed the BIOS out-of-warranty and bricked the board, the response would have been exactly the same. The only difference is that ASUS (or other manufacturer) wouldn't have charged him for the useless "tech support". Instead, he probably would have waited a week (or longer) for the same reply, albeit free.
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 11:13:04 AM

godbrother said:
What I don't understand is why they themselves never took responsabilty...

Because they know they can get away with it. Thats why i urge everyone i know not to buy anything from big corporations like Dell. Supporting small local businesses and retailers is the way to go and Im not talking only about electronics. It may cost a bit more to buy something but in the long run you will always be better off. I even bash my friends for shopping at supermarkets
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 12:08:10 PM

I agree with you 100% MaDMagik!! I would much rather spend my money at the neighborhood market and pay a few pennies more for a sleeve of donuts, knowing that my money is going into the guys pocket that I'm handing it to, instead of going to some fat cat CEO that is going to treat his employee's like dirt under his feet and everyone around him like peasants.
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 2:50:25 PM

Let me guess, you both are small business owners?

I've worked at several "Mom and Pop" shops over the years, known dozens of others who have. Mom and Pop might be nice enough, but they don't pay jack ***. Mom and Pop only give promotions to their children or grandchildren who are in-line for succession of the family business, or other favored family friends. Mom and Pop do not provide health insurance, profit sharing or stock purchasing plans, tuition assistance or reimbursement, or retirement.

All of which are provided by the evil big corporations, in addition to real opportunity for advancement. Further, Mom and Pop shops with fewer than 50 employees are totally exempt from just about every major labor law that protects workers such as the Family Medical Leave Act and Americans with Disabilities. The only people who really benefit from Mom and Pop shops are pretty much Mom, Pop, their children or grandchildren. Good riddance, Mom and Pop!

And again, the point is that his system was out-of-warranty. He would have received the exact same treatment had he bricked his $250 retail motherboard out-of-warranty.
November 27, 2009 3:36:09 PM

tcsenter said:
And again, the point is that his system was out-of-warranty. He would have received the exact same treatment had he bricked his $250 retail motherboard out-of-warranty.


Again, its not like he created his own bios flash and did it that way. He bricked it useing the bios update supplied by dell themselves.

O, I forgot to mention this it seems. His not the first victim... O boy, just go onto google and type in "Bios Kill Dell" and look at the hundreds of thousends of others that had to pay god knows how much to replace there dead motherboards becuase of dells bugged out bios update.
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 4:19:33 PM

Nobody creates their own ASUS BIOS, either. Its all supplied by the manufacturer. Whether you are expected to prepare the update method or its prepared for you, doesn't matter. Flash ROM updates are inherently risky. Always have been.

If you browse through ASUS forums, or MSI forums, Linksys forums, HP Forums, or [insert whoever here] forums, you'll find numerous similar incidents of people bricking their hardware with a firmware or BIOS update. And if its done out-of-warranty, it becomes your problem.
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 4:58:38 PM

godbrother said:
Again, its not like he created his own bios flash and did it that way. He bricked it useing the bios update supplied by dell themselves.

O, I forgot to mention this it seems. His not the first victim... O boy, just go onto google and type in "Bios Kill Dell" and look at the hundreds of thousends of others that had to pay god knows how much to replace there dead motherboards becuase of dells bugged out bios update.


Don't feel too bad, this is not all your fault or your friends, ignorance has a lot to do with it.
Just so you know, (because you evidently don't have clue either) the fastest way to kill your PC is to try and update your BIOS. It's a fact, period. If you do not know EXACTLY what you are doing, and why, you can and will end up with a dead PC. And to that end, the only time a BIOS update is ever needed, is if you are having a hardware issue, and a BIOS update has been created purposely to fix to your problem. Outside of that circumstance, updating your BIOS will do absolutely nothing for you. Nothing. Zero. Nada. I do not know the exact numbers, but I would say that a very large number of "dead" computers are the result of this exactly, a botched BIOS update. And yes, as your friend found out, there is nothing you can do except replace the board once it happens. It is a real pisser for sure, but that is the long and short of it.

You are preaching to the choir here so to speak.
Mistake #1 -Dude, you bought a Dell (well, maybe not a mistake, some people are better off with prebuilds, but Toms is not about prebuilds)
Mistake #2 -Follow advice from an email? Really, really stupid, idiotic, I cannot believe anyone would fall for such a dumb thing to do.
Mistake #3 -Trying to update your BIOS without really understanding why, or even exactly what you are doing.
=strikeout. I don't know.......... what more you would really expect?
a b V Motherboard
November 27, 2009 6:55:01 PM

tcsenter said:
Let me guess, you both are small business owners?
Im not sure how is that relevant.

OK, I probably shouldnt have used the term small business since its not exactly what I meant(Im not a native english speaker so I guess I can be excused) And no, I dont own a small business that would fit in either US or UK definition of small business.

Second, we were talkin about relation between corporation - customer, not corporation - employee, thats regarding your "mom and pop" example.

Also I dont want to really kickstart a discussion about decency, humanity and generally looking at other people as people and not just walking wallets, because Im not sure thats a right place for it.

Nobody says that this guy is totally blame free as everyone shoud think for themselves, but:

First Dell charged him for assistance, and then wanted £129 for replacement motherboard???? I guarantee that their motherboards are not better than any major manufacturer`s mid-range mobos available for half of that sum, and usually theyre much worse, using lesser quality components, and locked bioses are another thing. Bottom line is: corporations like dell dont want your gear to last any longer than the period of warranty they provide. They would love if it broke down as soon as it expired and It wouldnt surprise me one bit if they actually did things as described by OP to help it break down.

Now if this guy got his PC from me than he would also get the simple printed ageneral advice booklet warning him(among other things) about BIOS UPDATING and the risk it carries. If he emailed me and asked about it or anything else he would get a reply for free. Because of the way I do what I do, I dont want him to brick his motherboard as I neither can nor want to sell him a replacement and make profit out of it. I want him to be as happy with his gear as possible, so he would come back for a next PC, and so would let his friends know about me. Then friends of friends of friends etc. Thats how I make money on it. And I make just enough.

Going with another example, I buy my fruit and veg from my local grocers. Yes, they are a bit more expensive than those in supermarkets, but I know for a fact they come from a fairly local farmer that is based in this country. And even though they might not always look great this still is quality stuff that smells and tastes great. And I take this over chemical pumped, prefectly shaped, shiny, paper-like tasting stuff from supermarket any day of the week. Oh, and yes, i built several pcs for the owner, and laid a network in his house.

Theses were just simple examples, but can give hundreds more. So please, dont preach corporate goodness.
a c 156 V Motherboard
November 28, 2009 1:11:12 AM

tcsenter said:
His system was out-of-warranty. It wouldn't matter if he had purchased a $250 ASUS retail motherboard. If he flashed the BIOS out-of-warranty and bricked the board, the response would have been exactly the same. The only difference is that ASUS (or other manufacturer) wouldn't have charged him for the useless "tech support". Instead, he probably would have waited a week (or longer) for the same reply, albeit free.

Here's another "First" then ...

First, if you have an Asus, or other big name motherboard, and the manufacturer puts out a bad BIOS, the word gets around very fast. It shows up in the manufacturer's forums and it shows up in places like here. When Seagate first had their 7200.11 firmware problem, it took about 3 days for the word to get out, "Bad firmware. Do not use." And Seagate's reputation has taken a bad hit. I figure that, if they have no more problems, I'll start trusting them again when the 7200.15's come out. Until then, WD.

Then, if you are going to flash firmware, you need to follow directions exactly. And apparently people have a hard time doing that. When I flash firmware, because I do not have a UPS, I always flash late at night (midnight to 2 AM or so) because I figure that the power will be a little more stable.
July 28, 2013 8:48:31 PM

an email from dell don't think so my best guess is it was a scam of some sort dell doesn't send emails for updates still think it was some sort of scam set up to fry MoBo's
!