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What does the OC mean in specs?

Last response: in Memory
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November 28, 2009 8:07:17 PM

Ok probably a very basic question for some. But what does the OC mean in memory specs?

example:
Support Dual Channel DDR3 800/1066/1333/1600(OC)/1866(OC)/2000(OC) MHz

More about : specs

a c 80 } Memory
November 28, 2009 8:39:48 PM

It means that the memory controller is overclocked when using 1600 MHz or faster memory.
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a c 163 } Memory
November 28, 2009 9:13:37 PM

In other words, means that if you want the 1866 for example, you need set the specifications of your RAM manually in the BIOS. The voltage, CL....
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November 28, 2009 10:15:38 PM

Thank you. So basically I have three stock speeds I could purchase for my motherboard.
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a c 163 } Memory
November 28, 2009 10:49:25 PM

^Correct, the most usually in DDR3 are 1600 or 1333, get someone of this 1333 and enjoy it.
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November 30, 2009 3:42:23 AM

I have the exact same question, but the replies confuse me.

Are you saying that if I buy DDR3 1600, it will not work at all, or that I have to configure the BIOS to make it work at 1600?

In other words using the OP's example, what's the fastest RAM I can buy? 1333?
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a c 80 } Memory
November 30, 2009 10:36:40 AM

Quote:
Are you saying that if I buy DDR3 1600, it will not work at all, or that I have to configure the BIOS to make it work at 1600?
It will work, but you'll have to configure them manually in the BIOS. Buying quality 1333 MHz modules still is the best option because faster RAM doesn't necessarily provides improved performance.
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a c 163 } Memory
November 30, 2009 11:24:48 AM

seligman said:
I have the exact same question, but the replies confuse me.

Are you saying that if I buy DDR3 1600, it will not work at all, or that I have to configure the BIOS to make it work at 1600?

In other words using the OP's example, what's the fastest RAM I can buy? 1333?


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Correct, BUT how GhislainG said, the best option is that you buy a good 1333 memory that is stock for your mobo, 'cause how i see, you don't have too much experience in the O.C. process.
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November 30, 2009 11:38:32 AM

I've been starting a few threads. Sorry if it's too many basic questions for the regulars here. But I am a bit new to all this.

Saint19, I don't have a problem tweaking a few settings in the BIOS. But what I want from my system is coolest running and the most stability possible. And I would hope that helps with longevity too, because that is also important to me. And whenever I read about OCing I read about adding fans and extra cooling measures. Not only will it stress the system more, adding fans makes it a louder PC.

I just purchased some 1600(OC) RAM and now I am wondering if I made the right purchase. But I am also getting that I could probably run this RAM at lower setting though. Would running the 1600(OC) RAM at lower clock speed and voltage do what I am wanting from my system?
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a c 163 } Memory
November 30, 2009 12:34:27 PM

g725s said:
I've been starting a few threads. Sorry if it's too many basic questions for the regulars here. But I am a bit new to all this.

Saint19, I don't have a problem tweaking a few settings in the BIOS. But what I want from my system is coolest running and the most stability possible. And I would hope that helps with longevity too, because that is also important to me. And whenever I read about OCing I read about adding fans and extra cooling measures. Not only will it stress the system more, adding fans makes it a louder PC.

I just purchased some 1600(OC) RAM and now I am wondering if I made the right purchase. But I am also getting that I could probably run this RAM at lower setting though. Would running the 1600(OC) RAM at lower clock speed and voltage do what I am wanting from my system?


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The cooling of your system is only affected by overclok your CPU or PSU, the RAM don't dissipates too much heat.

The system must be stable at 1600 and 1333, how you said, is just set the configuration manually in the BIOS. If you buy a 1600 RAM, is possible that this can run to lower spedd, like 1333 or less. In this case, your mobo should be set the RAM to 1333 automatically.
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February 18, 2014 10:45:29 AM

On this topic of ram and overclocked ram, can this combo worked together?

http://www.corsair.com/us/memory-by-product-family/domi... Memory modules

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=13-128-... Motherboard

Also, about what saint19 says - When you use this ram on this board, would it even work, and if so, will the BIOS automatically set values, or would you have to manually set them? And, if you have to manually set them, what would you preferably set them to?
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a c 1941 } Memory
February 18, 2014 7:13:39 PM

With a Z87 mobo (as with most any) what DRAM you can run is primarily dependent on what CPU you have, the Haswell CPUs are native to 1600 DRAM, many run 1866 with no problem, but for 2133 and up you will want a 'K' model CPU. As far as setup, regardless of what DRAM you get, when first installed it will go to the mobo's default, normally 1333, for sticks 1600 and up you simply go into the BIOS and enable XMP and select Profile 1 and the BIOS should set the sticks up properly for you ;) 
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February 20, 2014 8:20:52 AM

Tradesman1 said:
With a Z87 mobo (as with most any) what DRAM you can run is primarily dependent on what CPU you have, the Haswell CPUs are native to 1600 DRAM, many run 1866 with no problem, but for 2133 and up you will want a 'K' model CPU. As far as setup, regardless of what DRAM you get, when first installed it will go to the mobo's default, normally 1333, for sticks 1600 and up you simply go into the BIOS and enable XMP and select Profile 1 and the BIOS should set the sticks up properly for you ;) 


Oh I see. My last couple of questions are, does the Mhz rating of ram affect performance, and would the modules in the link I provided work well with an i5 cpu? I also take it the "K" in a CPU must stand for some of the Intels, like shown in your forum signature detailing your desktop build. I have read the article in this forum detailing what RAM is but the article seems out of date, and kind of overly technical, hence all my questions.
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a c 1941 } Memory
February 20, 2014 5:04:44 PM

Yes, not so much in gaming, but in other areas, gaming primarily just uses DRAM as a conduit, when doing things like Video, imaging, CAD, etc, alot is actually done in the DRAM itself. With Z87 and Haswell, the CPUs have a native Mem freeq of 1600 so don't want lower than that, and Haswell scales to DRAM very well so it using faster (higher freq DRAM very well. The K CPUs are the unlocked, easily OCed CPUs of the Haswell line. And yes the MHz ratings does affect performance, especially with memory centric apps, the higher the freq or MHz, the more bandwidth is used at a time
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