Fans for GPU & CPU coolers

I'm looking for the highest airflow in 140mm fans under $20 each for the Thermalright Archon as well as the Alpenfohn Peter. Noise isn't that much of an issue because i'll have a fan controller if I can't stand it. LEDs optional :P
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  1. Gentle Typhoon AP-14 or AP-15. Those are 120mm but are much better that any 140mm fan and very quiet
  2. 140mm fans aren't as common as 120mm's so their is a scarce selection.

    Max Airflow 140mm's.Really don't have a good selecton.I think you should do what Saint19 said and go for 120mm fans instead.Their are far better fans that push more air.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=40000573%20600035655&IsNodeId=1&Description=140mm%20case%20fan&name=%3e80%20CFM&Order=BESTMATCH

    Max Airflow 120mm

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100007998%20600035590%20600035655%204093&IsNodeId=1&name=%2410%20-%20%2425&Order=PRICED&Pagesize=20

    About as good as your gonna get.
  3. Here is a link to tons of fans at FrozenCPU

    http://www.frozencpu.com/cat/l3/g36/c15/s775/list/p1/Fans-12_Volt_Fans-140mm_x_25mm_Fans-Page1.html

    I currently use Noiseblocker fans as they move great amounts of air and don't make a lot of noise. They are a bit more spendy but with the noise isolation rubber mounts and the 6 yr warranty I think they are worth it.

    http://www.frozencpu.com/products/10215/fan-659/Noiseblocker_NB-BlackSilentPro_PK-3_140mm_x_25mm_Ultra_Quiet_Fan_-_1700_RPM_-_27_dBA.html?tl=g36c15s775

    I have 4 of these fans in my Lian Li case and it took the noise level from unbearable to barely being able to hear them.
  4. I have no idea why you would change out a TR TY-140mm fan which imo is the best 140mm fan on the market.
    Cfm's have no direct influence on cooling performance.
    Cfm has a direct influence on db's though.
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/coolers/display/120-140-fans-roundup_28.html
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/coolers/display/140mm-fan-roundup_12.html#sect0
    Scythe, Thermalright,Nexus offer the best fans price/performance wise.
  5. I'm pretty sure CFM DOES matter to cooling performance...that's how it's measured! If a fan can't move a lot of air quickly, then it's not fulfilling it's duty as a fan.
  6. kustiki321 said:
    I'm pretty sure CFM DOES matter to cooling performance...that's how it's measured! If a fan can't move a lot of air quickly, then it's not fulfilling it's duty as a fan.

    It does, but there are more important aspects not listed in the specs. CFM is how much air the fan can move in absolute optimum conditions - picture a fan with absolutely nothing around it, and nothing to interfere with airflow. In real life, though, you're going to have things in front of and behind the fan; that's where its static pressure rating comes in. Static pressure is basically torque in fan terms - a fan with a high CFM rating but extremely low static pressure will fail in comparison to a fan with less CFM but a high static pressure rating.

    At least that's how I understand things.
  7. So I should be looking at fans with high CFMs as well as high static pressure ratings?
  8. Yes,mainly.

    I usually go with the highest CFM rating.But only because I know how my case/condistions are setup.I don't have anything blocking my fans at all.
  9. kustiki321 said:
    I'm pretty sure CFM DOES matter to cooling performance...that's how it's measured! If a fan can't move a lot of air quickly, then it's not fulfilling it's duty as a fan.

    An excerpt from SPCR.
    http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1040-page1.html
    Finally, CFM has no direct bearing on cooling, which is measured not by airflow but by a drop in temperature, usually in a device in the PC. Without the benefit of a thermal engineer's knowledge and detailed parameters about the components and conditions, CFM might as well be APH (angels per pin head). The relationship between CFM and cooling is at least as complex as that between SPL and perceived noise. The CFM value has no real meaning beyond itself. In contrast, with a bit of experience, 30 dBA/1m does have some meaning. Still, DIY computer tech geeks want to compare fans by their CFM rating, and in the SPCR (and other PC tech web) forums, some have gone so far as to specify what CFM rating they believe is needed for their application. This is a reliance on CFM numbers that has obfuscated the role of airflow in cooling. It's not really a surprise; CFM is one of the very few performance specs that fan manufacturers make available.

    Over the years, we have observed one clear phenomenon about fans and cooling: The relationship between airflow and temperature invariably becomes exponential at some point. Increase airflow from nothing to something, and the drop in temperature can be dramatic. Keep increasing airflow, and the cooling improvement becomes less and less significant, until at some point, the temperature hardly drops at all. The trick, for the PC builder who seeks both good cooling and low noise, is to find the point where any decrease in airflow (or fan speed) effects a significant increase in temperature, while only a very large airflow increase effects a significant temperature drop. In other words, once you have enough airflow, additional airflow has very little cooling effect, so all you're doing is increasing noise. "Enough airflow" is not a constant, of course, it varies for each system of components.
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