Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Micro atx vs. atx, and other upgrades

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
November 30, 2009 5:54:10 AM

What is the difference between the 2, besides the size (form factor). I am planning to upgrade to an core i7 920, ddr3 memory, full tower case, and mobo. Maybe by Christmas, maybe a little later. If core i7 turns out to still be too expensive, then I might go with the core i5. I noticed that the micro atx motherboards are a bit cheaper, and wondering if that would be fine if I stood with one video card. One last question, about motherboards, what is "O.C" mean when overclocking, do you need to buy RAM that is 1333 mhz for example that does not say "O.C." and overclock from there on to about 2000 mhz(O.C.), that is how most motherboards look like you have to do.

motherboards
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813157163
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813128375
or
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813130226
RAM:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820231223
CPU:
Core i7 920 (@ micro center for $200)
Case:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16811108190

All together, this is slightly out out my budget, should I wait, or just go for the core i5.

budget is less than $600 maybe $500 all together!!!
Thanks in Advanced!!!

More about : micro atx atx upgrades

a b V Motherboard
November 30, 2009 6:14:00 AM

Check for the socket, 1366 is not equal to 1156. The P55 chipsets are for the 1156, and it supports the i7 860 and the i5. The X58 on the other hand is a 1366 socket and only supports the i7 920 and up.

Check the specifications it is indicated whether it is a socket 1156 or 1366.

Also the 1366 is the "enthusiast" line wherein the planned i9's (six-core) are a possible drop-in upgrade.
Pros:
- Future six-core support
- Has a massive number of PCI-E lanes (36 to be exact)
- Triple-channel DDR3 gives massive ram bandwidth

Cons:
- Price


The 1156 is the "mainstream" line, and there are no news of it having the six-core processors.
Pros:
- Price

Cons:
- Only dual-channel (but it is actually sufficient for 90%+ of users)
- Has capability of 32 PCI-E lanes only (but it depends on the processor).


Now unless you're going to do some heavy production work (i.e. not gaming), or ready to pay for the higher price (for "future proofing"), the 1366/i7 920 is a better alternative.
m
0
l
November 30, 2009 7:01:40 AM

amnotanoobie said:
Check for the socket, 1366 is not equal to 1156. The P55 chipsets are for the 1156, and it supports the i7 860 and the i5. The X58 on the other hand is a 1366 socket and only supports the i7 920 and up.

Check the specifications it is indicated whether it is a socket 1156 or 1366.

Also the 1366 is the "enthusiast" line wherein the planned i9's (six-core) are a possible drop-in upgrade.
Pros:
- Future six-core support
- Has a massive number of PCI-E lanes (36 to be exact)
- Triple-channel DDR3 gives massive ram bandwidth

Cons:
- Price


The 1156 is the "mainstream" line, and there are no news of it having the six-core processors.
Pros:
- Price

Cons:
- Only dual-channel (but it is actually sufficient for 90%+ of users)
- Has capability of 32 PCI-E lanes only (but it depends on the processor).


Now unless you're going to do some heavy production work (i.e. not gaming), or ready to pay for the higher price (for "future proofing"), the 1366/i7 920 is a better alternative.

I knew about the 2 lga sockets, socket 1366 gives much better upgrading for the future, my plan was to get the i7 920, since that is the bottom line for 1366, and get 6gb of 1066mhz or 1333mhz memory to start with, then upgrade as hardware gets cheaper for what the motherboard supports.

I did not have a clue that the LGA 1156 supports 32 lanes( for the video cards, sound cards, and other hardware used up in the expansion slots???) and the LGA 1366 supports 36 lanes.
Wow, 1156 is only considered the "mainstream " line.

Is the core i5 worth $150, or better to get the core i7 for $200?+$54(because of taxes at micro center)
Is it better to spend $40 more on a LGA 1336 motherboard than a LGA 1156 motherboard?+40
Is it better to spend $90 on 2x2gb ram(dual channel) or $150 on 3x2gb triple channel memory?+60
LGA 1366 is $154 more than LGA 1366.
What is the better deal to you, better bang for buck?
I am not trying to be mean, I just want to know what you think, I read it and sounds kind of harsh.
m
0
l
Related resources
December 1, 2009 12:42:34 AM

if you do big work, if to analogize, treat your stuff like a truck.

my first board was an unknown, 12x12 (not ceb or eatx..what was it?)\
and considered workstation, (that also means ecc ram)

when someone explained to me what the sizes are for, I only use matx with the smallest cpus for a given socket, and continue to feed the ceb or full atx with the big cpus for a given socket, and even leave less memory in the matx.

it is a silent physics thing, and even then, the case has to be paid attention to, to match the form factors energy...matx more precisely than the others.
even a small mid tower with a 12x9.6 is room for the silent errors, ecc relation included.

just my learning. someone could have one heck of a nerd answer to follow. :whistle: 
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
December 1, 2009 1:36:56 AM

Well, if you were going to run tri-fire or quad-sli I might be inclined to go for 1366. The Core i5 and i7 (1156) only have 16 PCI-E lanes made available by the processor (as the PCI-E lanes are on the cpu itself, while on the 1366 the lanes are on the chipset. That would be 2 8x slots only for SLI, and tri-card setups would be a near impossibility with 1156 boards.

Based on the article: In Theory: How Does Lynnfield's On-Die PCI Express Affect Gaming?, in most cases the 1156's 2 8.0x PCI-E slots does seem to be able to keep up with 1366's twin 16X slots. (Though they haven't tested with the 5870 which might be able to saturate the 8x PCI-E slots)

And then there's the Foxconn 1156 socket issues...

But for uses such as gaming, regular internet surfing, you'd probably hardly notice the difference between an i5 and i7 (1156 or 1366) as their difference is not really large. But using highly threaded apps (apps that could use more than 4 threads), would be faster on either i7 than i5.
m
0
l
December 1, 2009 1:47:03 AM

bgd73 said:
if you do big work, if to analogize, treat your stuff like a truck.

my first board was an unknown, 12x12 (not ceb or eatx..what was it?)\
and considered workstation, (that also means ecc ram)

when someone explained to me what the sizes are for, I only use matx with the smallest cpus for a given socket, and continue to feed the ceb or full atx with the big cpus for a given socket, and even leave less memory in the matx.

it is a silent physics thing, and even then, the case has to be paid attention to, to match the form factors energy...matx more precisely than the others.
even a small mid tower with a 12x9.6 is room for the silent errors, ecc relation included.

just my learning. someone could have one heck of a nerd answer to follow. :whistle: 


Kind of hard to understand what you are saying. Anyway, I will only be using the computer for gaming, nothing else, that really needs more computer power. Unless word, power point, excel, publisher, and internet browsing uses more resources (just being sarcastic). It looks like will go with the core i7, even though it casts extra money, I will get 6gb of memory with that. If I decide to go with the core i5, I will most likely go with 8gb of memory.
m
0
l
a c 156 V Motherboard
December 1, 2009 1:51:20 AM

Original question:
bigal18 said:
What is the difference between the 2, besides the size (form factor).

Atx boards usually have more features. After all, there is more room for them. And usually, they have a better layout. If I had a full sized case, I'd probably use an ATX board unless the little one had a much better layout.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
December 1, 2009 5:11:31 AM

bigal18 said:
Kind of hard to understand what you are saying. Anyway, I will only be using the computer for gaming, nothing else, that really needs more computer power. Unless word, power point, excel, publisher, and internet browsing uses more resources (just being sarcastic). It looks like will go with the core i7, even though it casts extra money, I will get 6gb of memory with that. If I decide to go with the core i5, I will most likely go with 8gb of memory.


Today's games barely reach 2GB when running anyway, so your 6GB should last for quite a bit.
m
0
l
December 1, 2009 6:51:24 AM

I have made my decision to go with the core i7. I will be upgrading: ram;cpu;motherboard; and case. After all of the hardware is put into place, I am not that sure what I should do. I have have windows 7 home premium 64-bit installed on my current computer, and using the rest of the hardware from my current computer, such as my hard drive, optical drive, power supply, and video card. I know how to install the hardware in the computer, but I would want to know what I need to do before and after I reinstall windows 7 (heard that, that was the best thing to do) I wonder if there is anything else, such as drivers or anything else that needs to be installed before the os is reinstalled, and what to do after the os is installed. That is where I am shaky. Even an inexperienced user can put a computer together, I am new to this. Thank you in advanced, and for your previous posts. An answer is greatly appreciated.
m
0
l
a b V Motherboard
December 2, 2009 7:53:45 AM

If your Windows 7 is a retail copy, you'd need to call to reactivate it. For an OEM you're out of luck, as an OEM could only be activated with one motherboard model. Other than that I couldn't forsee any other immediate problem.
m
0
l
December 2, 2009 5:05:34 PM

It is a retail copy of windows. can I install it on a different hard drive. Is there anything else that I would have to do after I call them and reactivate windows 7. I heard that there is more that I would have to do. I heard that I had to do something before reinstalling window 7, and then reinstall it. Thank you for the response, I have to say that I would be very worried, because I had no clue that I had to do that.
m
0
l
December 4, 2009 8:17:35 AM

Is anyone there??? I have been very patient!!!
m
0
l

Best solution

a b V Motherboard
December 4, 2009 8:49:33 AM

Not sure, but from what I've read from other people it usually just involves calling and explaining why you need to reactivate. Don't remember if the common excuse was a "burnt motherboard"
Share
December 4, 2009 5:39:16 PM

Thank you!!!
m
0
l
!