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AMD 955BE Running HOT! need help

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May 10, 2011 11:53:20 PM

AMD 955BE running hot, as I write this @ 65c, normally it runs in the upper 50's just surfing the net. I have two 120mm fans (side of the case and on the back), but it's not enough. Not sure if my fan configurations are correct or I just need a new heatsink, currently using stock.

Need suggestions on heatsinks and fan configurations on the case.

More about : amd 955be running hot

a b K Overclocking
May 10, 2011 11:57:55 PM

Check the thermal paste, make sure that it hasn't dried up. If need be, remove current application and then redo it using Artic Silver 5. Generally, you don't need an aftermarket CPU cooler if you don't OC; it would be just a waste of money and time.
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May 11, 2011 12:18:06 AM

Thanxs for the quick reply. I would like to OC and I wan't to ensure that the system would run nice and cool. I still don't understand why it runs so hot.

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a b K Overclocking
May 11, 2011 1:56:01 AM

Well then, if you plan on doing an OC, you should definitely get an aftermarket cooler, the Hyper 212+ is a popular choice among the people of this forum. Install the cooler and use AS5; not the generic stuff that comes with the CPU or the Hyper 212+. If the temps go down, the problem was likely due to a bad thermal paste application.

Other areas to look are your fans - make sure they're spinning properly and spinning the correct way (intake vs. exhaust); ensure there isn't any thermal paste on the CPU pins; also check the heatsink fan - ensure it is also spinning properly.

In terms of fan configuration, you'll have to decide for yourself. Just know that there is a difference, but the question that matters to every individual is: "Does it matter?" Personally, I have negative air pressure because I leave both of my side panels off, but left on, my case pressure would be more or less neutral. Simply research positive and negative air pressure here:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/238184-31-case-airflo...

Cases can make a big difference in the way the air pressure vents. Make sure that your wiring isn't bunched up anywhere there is air flow (basically tuck your wires/cables in one of the empty HDD bays).
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May 11, 2011 9:48:53 PM

Best answer selected by cromero55.
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July 20, 2011 2:29:39 AM

Still running hot after two applications of AS5. First time, temps running at 64c and figured I had applied it wrong. Did it a second time, temps now running at 62c with just this page open (no heavy load)> Please advice.
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July 20, 2011 3:03:34 AM

T_T said:
Well then, if you plan on doing an OC, you should definitely get an aftermarket cooler, the Hyper 212+ is a popular choice among the people of this forum. Install the cooler and use AS5; not the generic stuff that comes with the CPU or the Hyper 212+. If the temps go down, the problem was likely due to a bad thermal paste application.

Other areas to look are your fans - make sure they're spinning properly and spinning the correct way (intake vs. exhaust); ensure there isn't any thermal paste on the CPU pins; also check the heatsink fan - ensure it is also spinning properly.

In terms of fan configuration, you'll have to decide for yourself. Just know that there is a difference, but the question that matters to every individual is: "Does it matter?" Personally, I have negative air pressure because I leave both of my side panels off, but left on, my case pressure would be more or less neutral. Simply research positive and negative air pressure here:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/238184-31-case-airflo...

Cases can make a big difference in the way the air pressure vents. Make sure that your wiring isn't bunched up anywhere there is air flow (basically tuck your wires/cables in one of the empty HDD bays).


Thank you for the helpful information and I did take your advice, but I'm still running hot after two applications of AS5. First time, temps running at 64c and figured I had applied it wrong. Did it a second time, temps now running at 62c with just this page open (no heavy load). Any thoughts? .
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a b À AMD
a b K Overclocking
July 20, 2011 10:29:08 AM

make any fans at the rear/top of your case exhaust fans (blowing air out of the case) intake fans should be at the bottom-front only and be kept to a minimum. What is the ambient temperature of the room? do you live in a hot climate? If ambient temps are above 27C maybe you need an airconditioner in the room. Did you take the advice of the above and get a coolermaster hyper 212? or just do thermal paste? you should also note, AS5 takes time to cure and reach its maximum efficiency. Google "correct way to apply thermal paste" to make sure your doing it properly.
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July 20, 2011 11:33:42 AM

Still using stock heatsink. The room has AC and I researched how to apply the AS5. I have negative pressure with a rear and side fan (both 120mm). I just don't understand how I'm running hotter now with the AS5. I will let it cure, but I'm suspecting I might have to get an aftermarket heatsink and fan. I think the 212+ will not fit my case b/c the positioning of the RAM any other suggestions.
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a b K Overclocking
July 20, 2011 5:22:02 PM

Check out www.frozencpu.com for CPU coolers. The popular ones (because they've been proven to perform well) are:

1. Scythe Mugen 2
2. CM Hyper 212+
3. Noctua NH-D14
4. Titan Fenrir (not on the top 10 list, but I use it w/ AS5 and my temps stay below 60°C while gaming.)

In regards to your temps, check these areas:

1. Remove the side panel(s) to allow more air in/out, but inside is more susceptible to dust build-up
2. Ensure the wiring inside the case isn't too scattered and isn't blocking the path of air from/to case fans
3. Ensure that the heatsink is securely connected to the CPU
4. Check out www.frozencpu.com for better case fans
5. Perhaps it is also time to consider a case with better airflow
6. Take a good, clean picture of the side view of your case w/ the side panel removed, to expose the inside of your case so we can see what, if anything, is hindering airflow
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July 26, 2011 12:16:59 AM

T_T said:
Check out www.frozencpu.com for CPU coolers. The popular ones (because they've been proven to perform well) are:

1. Scythe Mugen 2
2. CM Hyper 212+
3. Noctua NH-D14
4. Titan Fenrir (not on the top 10 list, but I use it w/ AS5 and my temps stay below 60°C while gaming.)

In regards to your temps, check these areas:

1. Remove the side panel(s) to allow more air in/out, but inside is more susceptible to dust build-up
2. Ensure the wiring inside the case isn't too scattered and isn't blocking the path of air from/to case fans
3. Ensure that the heatsink is securely connected to the CPU
4. Check out www.frozencpu.com for better case fans
5. Perhaps it is also time to consider a case with better airflow
6. Take a good, clean picture of the side view of your case w/ the side panel removed, to expose the inside of your case so we can see what, if anything, is hindering airflow


So I removed the side panel, moved some cables around and still running at 63-65c. I have two coolmaster 120mm case fans, not sure how good they are, but seem to have good reviews when I ordered them. I did realize that my asus Black Knight GPU has a tendency of running hot as well and I'm thinking that this may be the cause of my problem. I'm ordering a new HSF so I have to take into account the air flow of my computer case when making my decision? Currently I have both the side and rear fans pushing air out of the case. Thanks for your help. PS - I have a pic but not sure how to post it, will try to post it soon.
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a b K Overclocking
July 26, 2011 1:56:25 AM

Sorta... Some coolers have top mounted fans, while most others have side mounted fans. If the CPU cooler has a top mounted fan, then ideally the side panel fan should flow in the same direction as the CPU cooler fan.

When it comes to air flow, what you need to keep in mind are the facts about either configuration (pos or neg). For the sake of discussion, let's say your case is a typical build, and by typical I mean:

1. 1 x 120 MM intake fan - mounted at the bottom of the front panel
2. 1 x 80 MM exhaust fan - mounted at the rear, just below the PSU
3. Removable side panel(s) - option to install 1 x 80 MM case fan

If this is what your case looks like, you may want to consider better and/or bigger fans.
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July 29, 2011 12:02:19 AM

TT - just wanted to thank you for your help and input. Finally decided to go with the Corsair H60 after taking into consideration the hot video card, room temps, and air flow of the case. About the same price for a good HSF and another fan that I needed. Temps are way down 35-37c with AC on in the room and 43c with some load.
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a b K Overclocking
July 29, 2011 12:16:58 AM

Very nice. Glad I could help. And now that you learned a thing or two , don't be afraid to share your newly found wisdom with others.
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July 29, 2011 6:14:22 AM

iam2thecrowe said:
make any fans at the rear/top of your case exhaust fans (blowing air out of the case) intake fans should be at the bottom-front only and be kept to a minimum. What is the ambient temperature of the room? do you live in a hot climate? If ambient temps are above 27C maybe you need an airconditioner in the room. Did you take the advice of the above and get a coolermaster hyper 212? or just do thermal paste? you should also note, AS5 takes time to cure and reach its maximum efficiency. Google "correct way to apply thermal paste" to make sure your doing it properly.

My case has an intake fan on the top with a dust filter. Is this bad? Btw my front intake cant even intake, b/c my front panel blocks it, so I basially just pushes air, which I assume is good. Also all my fans move a good amount of air, and its funny because my be stock is noisier than all 3 of my case fans combined.
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a b K Overclocking
July 29, 2011 6:10:14 PM

Intake on the top? That's odd. Intake fans should be at the bottom of the case, since cold air sinks. And as you might guess, hot air rises, so it would be more efficient to have exhaust fans at the top to pull the hot air out.

The problem with the front intake fan doesn't surprise me. A lot of cheap(er) cases have this problem. Midsize cases are less efficient with air flow, as they often have the front intake fan blocked by the HDD bays, or by the HDD, depending on how the case was constructed.

If you're concerned about the noise, you can get highly efficient cooling (far better than stock) for very low noise (far less than stock). Such a fan would be the Noctua NH-D14. Checkout www.frozencpu.com for the specs.
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July 29, 2011 7:20:18 PM

T_T said:
Intake on the top? That's odd. Intake fans should be at the bottom of the case, since cold air sinks. And as you might guess, hot air rises, so it would be more efficient to have exhaust fans at the top to pull the hot air out.

The problem with the front intake fan doesn't surprise me. A lot of cheap(er) cases have this problem. Midsize cases are less efficient with air flow, as they often have the front intake fan blocked by the HDD bays, or by the HDD, depending on how the case was constructed.

If you're concerned about the noise, you can get highly efficient cooling (far better than stock) for very low noise (far less than stock). Such a fan would be the Noctua NH-D14. Checkout www.frozencpu.com for the specs.

Ye a my front fan's intake airflow is blocked by tinted glass on the front, (its an enermax luxuray and has a sexy vegas fan the shines through the shaded glass (it looks like apart of the case until the fan's on)). This blox it from intaking air. It is also blocked from pushing (exhausting much air cuz the hdd bays are blockin it. This case is actual very solid for the $ and has good amount of airflow contrary to what u think. Should I switch the top fan around so it e xhaust air? Btw I know heat rises and cold air sinks thats common knowledge :) 
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a b K Overclocking
July 29, 2011 8:20:26 PM

Unless there is some good reason why the top fan is used as an intake, yeah, I'd switch it. It is possible that the fan was installed incorrectly from the manufacturer.
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July 29, 2011 9:02:56 PM

T_T said:
Unless there is some good reason why the top fan is used as an intake, yeah, I'd switch it. It is possible that the fan was installed incorrectly from the manufacturer.

I doubt it, because there's a dust filter for the top fan, so it was definitely ment to be intake. It blows directly on the cpu though and I think the reason its an intake is because the fans seem to push more than suck air, but I may be wrong.
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a b K Overclocking
July 29, 2011 10:42:28 PM

It could be that I just don't understand the design logic of this case, but after looking a pics of this case, I still don't have sufficient info to believe that the top fan as an intake serves a better purpose than having it as an exhaust fan.

Here are my thoughts:

1. Front panel - like you said - is blocked not only by the plastic shield, but by the HDD bay area

2. PSU mounts at the bottom. This makes the top of the case a lot cooler, but if you have a PSU that doesn't pull the air out, your internal temps may be higher than you care for. This shouldn't be too big of a concern, though, as most good/high quality PSUs have one fan on the rear, and one on the bottom.

All-in-all, just monitor your system. If you feel your temps are too high, then maybe you should consider switching the orientation of the top fan, but this case does have quite a bit of fan placement options, so the top fan as intake may not be so bad if the side panel fans are used as intake too. But if you use the side panel fans as exhaust you'll be blowing out the cool air coming in from the top before it can get to your CPU.
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July 29, 2011 11:18:38 PM

T_T said:
It could be that I just don't understand the design logic of this case, but after looking a pics of this case, I still don't have sufficient info to believe that the top fan as an intake serves a better purpose than having it as an exhaust fan.

Here are my thoughts:

1. Front panel - like you said - is blocked not only by the plastic shield, but by the HDD bay area

2. PSU mounts at the bottom. This makes the top of the case a lot cooler, but if you have a PSU that doesn't pull the air out, your internal temps may be higher than you care for. This shouldn't be too big of a concern, though, as most good/high quality PSUs have one fan on the rear, and one on the bottom.

All-in-all, just monitor your system. If you feel your temps are too high, then maybe you should consider switching the orientation of the top fan, but this case does have quite a bit of fan placement options, so the top fan as intake may not be so bad if the side panel fans are used as intake too. But if you use the side panel fans as exhaust you'll be blowing out the cool air coming in from the top before it can get to your CPU.

Alright, my psu has one 135mm fan facing down at dust filters, no rear fan but still seems to move a good amount of air out the back. Im thinking of takin off the top fan and putting on the side panel above the cpu. I then will install a 140mm fan on the top (its supports 140) and might have to buy another dust filter. With this setup my cpu u should stay pretty cool even with the stock fan, right? Im not into buying an aftermarket fan cuz they're rather expensive for what u get, a heatsink and a fan. I will oc my 955, btw


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a b K Overclocking
July 30, 2011 12:05:02 AM

geis said:
Im not into buying an aftermarket fan cuz they're rather expensive for what u get, a heatsink and a fan. I will oc my 955, btw


How cool your temps will be will only be determined by how far you want OC, especially with just the stock cooler, which I wouldn't recommend. That said, you should monitor the temps with software such as:

HW Monitor, Speedfan, GPUZ, CPUZ
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