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Oiling Pc Fans

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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
May 12, 2011 3:40:21 PM

Hi, I just read about oiling pc fans to make them quieter and last longer.
This is one of the websites.
http://www.dansdata.com/fanmaint.htm

What do you guys think about oiling fans?

More about : oiling fans

a c 190 K Overclocking
May 12, 2011 3:56:08 PM

I strip my pc every 6 weeks or so to clean out the case,
checking over my fans and oiling them is part of that but I know I'm a rarity
nice link though for those who've never entertained the idea before :) 
Moto
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May 12, 2011 7:43:05 PM

Is it possible to oil gtx460 fan without removing heatsink?
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
May 12, 2011 8:09:09 PM

I think you have to get to the other side of the fan on a graphics card which means removing the heatsink.

Are there any problems that might occur by oiling pc fans?
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a c 190 K Overclocking
May 13, 2011 6:11:04 AM

^ yup, if you want to oil gfx card fans, your in for a fun ride
problems oiling fans?
other than clumsiness I.E. spilling oil everywhere or dropping too much into a bearing so it flies out when it turns on I dont see any downsides to it
Moto
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May 13, 2011 3:48:26 PM

Hmmm,, I find that a little grease mixed with a bit of lighter fluid and the excess drained off with a paper towel works better ,, grease is heaver than oil and will not get gummed up with dust and stuff, whatever trips your trigger..:) 
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
May 14, 2011 11:29:07 PM

What oil would be best? Most I've read is that 3inone or sewing machine oil is good and wd-40 is bad. But than another place i read said the opposite and that 3inone and sewing machine and wd40 is all terrible and that there was an oil dedicated for pc fans, which I haven't found. What grease/oil is best?
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a c 190 K Overclocking
May 15, 2011 11:34:01 AM

I use a squirt of Wd40, but then I do mine regularly,
if its a once/twice a year thing I'd say a small dab of light grease in there would last well enough, the important thing is that you do something to help keep your fans working well
Moto
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
May 15, 2011 3:19:04 PM

What kind of grease?
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a b K Overclocking
May 15, 2011 3:52:09 PM

Grease is a thick film lubricant for heavy loads that require a high film strength. It may work on old fans where the clearances are high, but will not work efficiently on newer fans with the correct bearings clearances.

As someone already mentioned, sleeve bearings (like 'Oilite' bushings) have impregnated sintered bronze bushings with an open cell structure. Generally, this is impregnated with a lifetime lubricant. However, a drop of oil applied sparingly will help prolong the life, and quieten the bearing. Synthetic oil such as Mobil 1 (SAE 30) will work fine. (BTW, the 'WD' in WD-40 stands for 'Water Dispersant').

Do not use a spout to dispense the oil. Instead, use a piece of bare 12 Ga. or 14 Ga. copper wire, dip the end in the oil, and touch it to the bearing until you get about 1/2 to 1 drop of oil on the bearing. This should last about 6 months in normal use.
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June 1, 2011 8:12:50 AM

yeah like Uberales said, the WD in WD-40 is for "Water Dispersant" meaning it will not short out any circuitry.

it is a light fish oil compound (the smell) and is light enough to saturate the bearing hub, and pour out the old dirt/dust from within the hub area.

i spray into the hub area (keeping the fan hub facing up like a bowl) and fill it full of WD then i pour it out. i do this until when i pour the liquid out it is clear and not dark. ALSO i spin the fan blade to kinda clean all the rotational surfaces inside, then i pour it out. as i said i do this till the poured out liquid is clear again.

when i am done cleaning, i slap the fan verticle and then horizontal (hub bowl facing down) into a hand towel i am holding. i slap all the liquid i can out of the fan so it will not drip when i reinstall it.

wipe down the fan housing and blades with your hand towl and if you can plug it in out of the case to let any (if any - usually not) sling out.

your fans smell a little funky, but they are clean on the inside, and look new again because of the light oil coating on the outside.

the smell goes away after a day or so.

also i have never ever had any kind of problems with new dust/lint stuff sticking to the fan blades or housing ever.

i do this every 2-3 months.

hope this helps.

PEACE!!!
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June 2, 2011 2:06:10 AM

if you get scythe slipstreams you need to oil them other fans should be oiled but some, like S-FDB bearing ones not as much. Also WD-40 isn't really supposed to be for oiling the fans because it's a penetrant not a lubricant try bones speed cream
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a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2011 2:47:17 PM

Another option is Hoppe's firearm lubricant. It is a light and effective lubricant. Stay away from grease.
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June 2, 2011 7:34:33 PM

VERY good idea Uberales ^+10

yeah when i think of grease, i think of a wheel bearing on an old 48 Chevy - LOL

Hoppe's firearm lubricant @ Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias...

Check this out also:
Smith & Wesson Advanced Gun Oil with Cerflon
http://www.amazon.com/Smith-Wesson-SW001-Advanced-Cerfl...
Learn more about Cerflon:
http://www.cerflon.com/

I just ordered some of this S&W w/ Cerflon for my future fan lubricating from now on.

Thanks Uberales - because I was adding the word silicon to firearm lubricants and came accros this S&W w/ cerflon.
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June 2, 2011 8:25:03 PM

Could someone post an url where to buy gtx460 fan? Doesn't have to be genuine.
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a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2011 8:38:38 PM

Majestic One said:
VERY good idea Uberales ^+10

yeah when i think of grease, i think of a wheel bearing on an old 48 Chevy - LOL

Hoppe's firearm lubricant @ Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias...

Check this out also:
Smith & Wesson Advanced Gun Oil with Cerflon
http://www.amazon.com/Smith-Wesson-SW001-Advanced-Cerfl...
Learn more about Cerflon:
http://www.cerflon.com/

I just ordered some of this S&W w/ Cerflon for my future fan lubricating from now on.

Thanks Uberales - because I was adding the word silicon to firearm lubricants and came accros this S&W w/ cerflon.

Remember to use just a drop or less. In this case 'Less is better'. Excessive oil will be a magnet for dust and other abrasive material and will actually be detrimental. I use a piece of 14 Ga. wire, apply the oil to the wire, and then direct the tip of the wire to the spot that I want lubricated. Do not use the spray to lube the bearing.
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June 2, 2011 10:29:51 PM

Ubrales said:
Remember to use just a drop or less. Do not use the spray to lube the bearing.


10-04 Uber-dood
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a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2011 11:08:01 PM

Majestic One said:
10-04 Uber-dood

Into trucking or LE? the '10' codes reminds me of a nice Johnny joke.

Teacher to Johnny: "Make a sentence using the word 'asinine'
Johnny: "I'd give her face a 4, and her asinine!

Now back to the original topic.
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June 2, 2011 11:27:31 PM

heh heh heh... that's no little johnny joke, man!!! IT'S TOO CLEAN!!! (ABTW - you just goofed this thread up, man - now everybody is gonna have a joke...)

no i'm not into trucking... but that reminds ME of a joke...

(i'll clean it up... ALOT!)

trucker's going along and swerves to run into every jerkoff he sees on the highway.
he see's a priest w/ a gas can & picks him up.
trucker sees a group of jerkoffs and pretends to fall asleep in front of the priest and swerves at them.
BOOM BOOM BANG DI-BANG BOOM!!!!
"DID I GET 'EM?" his yells pretending to come out of the sleep
"Nope... but I hit every one of them with this gas can on the way by!!!"
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a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2011 11:44:56 PM

I wonder what happened to the OP?
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June 3, 2011 12:57:41 AM

lol - probably oiling his fans!
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 3:11:21 AM

Hmm... read every post immediately after you guys posted. Oiled my fans ages ago. @Majestic One do you relalize that you revived on a half a month dead thread? I don't mind but after half a month I didn't think that anybody was going to post anything. :p 

Quick side question to add on. I remember reading that sleeve fans are best if they are orientated horizontally and not vertically. I'm guessing this has to do with the pressure being on one side. Does orientation of sleeve fans affect lifetime and noise noticeably? Or is just oiling them more than sufficient. But still don't know which lubricant is the very BEST. I've been using mineral oil only on my old fans because I heard that many other oils leave residues that may gump up the inside.
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 3:15:43 AM

The reason I used mineral oil is because in the link that I originally posted, the person used 3-in-one for lubricant and he wrote to use the mineral one because it was better than the vegetable oil one. So I thought it was just better if I just used pure mineral oil instead. Hope i' not killing anything.
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a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 4:06:09 AM

The ball bearing fans have sealed bearings - no oil needed.

The sleeve bearing fans have sleeves made of open cell sintered bronze material; impregnated with oil for life. If you feel that you need to oil these, use some light Hoppe's oil; available at sporting goods stores.
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June 3, 2011 4:51:03 AM

no definitely don't use veggie oil (only in a DIRE straight) & i personally would not recommend mineral oil or baby oil. it's good for skin and aching muscles - but is too thin for this application.

seriously i would personally not be that concerned with bearings and life wear considering there are 80+ CFM 120mm fans for $6 each out there... if oil don't work to get me by to my next fan purchase then the side comes off LOL.

i bought this crap today:
http://www.amazon.com/Smith-Wesson-SW001-Advanced-Cerfl...
ONLY because I have 2 new InWin Dragon Rider cases coming and thought since the fans have never had a life yet, I might try a cheap preventative measure before they do begin their lives. seemed only logical to me.

here is a VERY good read on different types of bearings. I read this last night while on the discovery of what a rifle bearing was.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bearing_%28mechanical%29

PEACE, bear

EDIT: by BTW folks the InWin Dragon Rider is on sale this month for $129 after $20 mail in;
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 1:45:32 PM

The InWin DR case looks good! Particularly the fan on the right side of the case; this will create some good cross flow ventilation! I bet Cooler Master and others will pick up on this in some manner.
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a c 190 K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 8:20:12 PM

Mine arrived today, so its plannning, measuring, cutting and drilling tomorrow :) 
Xspc Rasa RX240 is here too so I can plan my hose routes too :) 
Moto
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a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 8:52:51 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
Mine arrived today, so its plannning, measuring, cutting and drilling tomorrow :) 
Xspc Rasa RX240 is here too so I can plan my hose routes too :) 
Moto

Remember "Measure twice, cut once!"
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a c 190 K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 9:17:28 PM

I'm going overkill on prep for this one,
painters tape to avoid scratches,
clean bench every few minutes of scurf etc
mark,pilot hole, drill for holes,
and a fresh disk in the ol' angle grinder :p 
With my ocd I tend to measure forty times anyway lol :p 
Moto
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a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 10:10:26 PM

Motopsychojdn said:
I'm going overkill on prep for this one,
painters tape to avoid scratches,
clean bench every few minutes of scurf etc
mark,pilot hole, drill for holes,
and a fresh disk in the ol' angle grinder :p 
With my ocd I tend to measure forty times anyway lol :p 
Moto

One suggestion - when you use a hole saw or a fine toothed recip saw (Sawzall), try and sandwich the sheet metal between 2 pieces of 1/2" plywood and clamp well. Also cover the area being cut with duct tape on both sides. The cut will be much better this way. Applies to drilling too. Look into a Greenlee hole punch too (common electrician's tool)..
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a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 10:55:30 PM

Just buy a Noctua fan...
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June 3, 2011 11:39:53 PM

HELLZ YEAH!!!
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June 4, 2011 10:16:42 AM

@ Uberales
Ubrales said:
The InWin DR case looks good! Particularly the fan on the right side of the case; this will create some good cross flow ventilation! I bet Cooler Master and others will pick up on this in some manner.

yeah I was going to get the antec 900 until I saw this baby! that fan behind the MoBo is what sold me on this case besides the 8 expansion slots and MANY other cool features. every case has it's little "niche" of a selling point, but this case seemed to put them all in one place. I am very happy with this purchase. Matter of fact, my mother and I BOTH got one! LOL when she saw it she was like "I WANT ONE TOO!!!" - and besides the killer features, her nick is Red Dragon Rider - so I am going to mod hers to be all red LED vs the factory blue LOL.

@Bigmac
Quote:
Just buy a Noctua fan...

I support Australian made (AC/DC) but I would have to say the Cooler Master V8 is a much better buy - and besides... it's just WAY to frikkin cool lookin'!

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a b K Overclocking
June 4, 2011 2:18:20 PM

I have the CV V8 heatsink. I installed it on an i7-920 and got idle temps of 34 to 35 degs. C.

Then I decided to upgrade the mobo per EVGA's 'Step up' plan. While waiting for the new mobo to arrive, I decided to polish (no such thing as lapping on a 40mm x 40mm base) the base of the heatsink. The base was concave by about 0.0005". Enough to reduce heat transfer. The polishing solved that and rendered the base much flatter than before.

Re-installed everything. The idle temps were 5 to 8 degrees less than what they were before polishing. (I left the CPU heat spreader alone).
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June 4, 2011 3:24:16 PM

how did you "polish" the base, Uber?

2500 grit color sanding paper... buffer wheel???

btw, what kind of thermal compound you using.

i am going to end up using OCZ'z "freeze" - a lot of reviewers say it does exactly what the package claims... drops temp 10-15% under average thermal compound temps.
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
June 4, 2011 5:43:55 PM

thread hijacking much?
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June 4, 2011 10:35:58 PM

well i guess you might have to pick a good solution?? maybe to end it???
i dunno, bear.

you haven't learned anything new? Uberales is pretty smart up on here.
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a b K Overclocking
June 4, 2011 11:47:05 PM

Majestic One said:
how did you "polish" the base, Uber?

2500 grit color sanding paper... buffer wheel???

btw, what kind of thermal compound you using.

i am going to end up using OCZ'z "freeze" - a lot of reviewers say it does exactly what the package claims... drops temp 10-15% under average thermal compound temps.

I polished the base starting with 400 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper. When all the machining marks and high spots were gone, I switched to 1200 grit and finished it with that. The process took me about 20 minutes.

Thermal compound Arctic Silver 5

I have a much more detailed write-up on this on some other thread here.
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2011 12:14:18 AM

Found it! Here is the guide I wrote:


Guide to Polishing Heatsink bases.

Polishing Heatsink bases is usually done by enthusiasts in order to improve heat transfer between the CPU and the heatsink. This, when done correctly results in lower CPU temps, thereby prolonging CPU life and also improving Overclocking capabilities.

Polishing is loosely referred to as "Lapping", but let it be known that whereas polishing can be done at home on a flat work surface, lapping can only be done utilizing highly accurate, expensive, and precise Lapping Machines costing tens of thousands of dollars.

Flatness and an improvement in micro finish is the objective, not necessarily a mirror finish. Frequently, after polishing, the improved flatness and the fine micro finish will make the surface look more or less like a mirror finish.

Tools requited are 1200 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper, 2000 grit Silicon Carbide (wet or dry) paper (optional), elbow grease, and a few drops of water.

Here are the series of steps for polishing the base of a heatsink:

1. Find a flat surface to use as a base. A piece of 12" x 12" x 1/4" glass will work (glass top cocktail table, end table, breakfast table).

2. Lay a full sheet of 1200 grit Silicon Carbide paper flat on the glass surface and ensure that this sheet does not slip or slide during the polishing process. Put about 4 drops of water in the center of this sheet.

3. Place the heatsink base squarely over the center of the Silicon Carbide paper and gently start moving the heatsink base back and forth in about 2" strokes. The direction of the stroking must be towards you and away from you. Care must be taken not to tip the heatsink while you are doing this. Use a light downward force. Light force. Light force. Holding the heatsink closer to the base will help. Again, light downward force. (Practice doing this on a sheet of plain paper first if necessary - this will give you confidence).

4. Continue the stroking towards you and away from you, staying on the same central area of the Silicon Carbide sheet. Move your body (not the work piece) about 30 degrees and continue the stroking. Like dancing around a May pole. This will change the polishing direction on the heatsink base. Repeat for about 10 minutes.

5. By now, you will notice that the polishing residue on the Silicon Carbide paper is reddish - this is the color of the copper base under the Nickel plating film that is now polished away. Using the edge of a razor blade is an approximation of a straight edge. It is not a straight edge, but will give you ball park information that is close enough.

6. Continue for 10 more minutes on the same sheet of Silicon Carbide paper, and you are done. VIOLA!

7. Continuing Polishing with the 2000 grit paper is purely optional. Like icing (frosting) on the cake.


A note about the CPU: Leave the CPU alone. The heat spreader of the CPU is a sheet metal component made by the draw (see "deep drawing”) process. The thermal expansion characteristics of thin sheet metal drawn parts are hard to determine. I am reasonably sure (oxymoron?) that there will be some improvement in heat transfer if the high spots at the corners of the CPU are polished away, but the marginal gains may not be worth the efforts. Therefore, I am not recommending any polishing of the CPU. Another point to note would be that any alteration will void the warranty.
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June 5, 2011 5:40:40 AM

dude - first things first

I want to apologize for misspelling your call all this damn time!!!
"holy S*** batman your an imbecile!!"
"yeah, makes me wonder boy!"

dude i am not making excuses but i am on my mom's machine doing some tweaks, and am looking at a 21" monitor vs my usual 42" from my living room recliner - dude how the HELL did i miss that???

i apologize Ubrales (-e)

ok now that's said...

cool i copied your artricle AND added the author name (hmmm. LOL)

looks like I can get the Silicon Carbide wet or dry at Harbor Freight here in Las Vegas - COOL-aide!!!

i am willing to give this a shot - i like how you specifically mentioned to move your body, and NOT your hand... GOOD ONE, man. so I am all for this trick.

Thanks, man

EDIT:
hey, Ubrales check out this article:
http://forums.overclockersclub.com/index.php?showtopic=...

it says 600 grit is optimal for best thermal transfer.

here's a tweaktown review on OCZ Freeze:
http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/1265/ocz_freeze_therma...
(final result page)

and here is a top five of 33 thermal compounds test:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
(page 5 of 6)
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2011 1:20:25 PM

The right spelling is Uber Alles! LOL - I abbreviated it to 7 letters as that was all I could get on a licence plate. No need to apologize buddy! I have been called worse! LOL

BTW, I bought my silicon carbide at Harbor Freight in Chicago; some good products in a pile of junk! "Somewhere buried in all this horse crap there is a nice pony!"

Thank you, I read all 3 posts that you linked. Good info. Reminded me of my days with YAG lasers. When properly handled and with safety precautions, lasers are safer than the cars we drive around carrying about 100 pounds of explosive gasoline at the rear of the car. Another scary but safe situation is a furnace operating at 1850 degrees F with a Hydrogen reducing atmosphere! And the hydrogen was produced by cracking anhydrous Ammonia at 1750 degs. F.
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June 5, 2011 4:27:59 PM

yeah i always thin of the Dead Kennedys - California Uber Alles - LOL
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a b K Overclocking
June 5, 2011 4:41:33 PM

Majestic One said:
yeah i always thin of the Dead Kennedys - California Uber Alles - LOL

No wonder people waved out as I was driving on I-680 in the Bay Area!
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June 5, 2011 4:54:09 PM

guarantee it, man.
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a b K Overclocking
June 26, 2011 2:32:23 PM

What happened to the OP?
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a b K Overclocking
June 26, 2011 6:08:00 PM

On the request of the OP, the thread is being closed...
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!