Single / Dual / Triple Data Rate

I am working on an article for my computer hardware class and have decided to base it partially on single, dual, and triple data rate memory. I choose this topic because my knowledge is very limited here, so it would be a great way to further my knowledge in this area.

Why did I not do tons of research on the internet instead of posting here? Yes, I did do some research on my own for this topic, but it always helps to talk within someone who has extensive knowledge on the topic to help make things clear. Yes, I can tell you exactly what each type does, but I cannot explain to you how they work or the benefits, while understanding myself.

Please, post what each type does and how it works. Also, if you can please explain each one also to the greatest detail your knowledge and time will allow. Also if you know of a good article please send it to me, as I am willing to further my independent research.

Thanks
16 answers Last reply
More about single dual triple data rate
  1. Why not start by reading http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/167/1? Wikipedia also is a good place to get basic info.
  2. Thank you for your post.

    Would this be correct-

    Single Date Rate - SDRAM

    Double Date Rate - DDR and DDR2

    Triple Date Rate - DDR3

    Slightly confused in this topic.
  3. Please help me, I am at a lost with this topic! I have read that article several times and I am unable to find where it explains Single Date Rate. Above is just my guessing ( previous post by myself ).
  4. camstang said:
    Thank you for your post.

    Would this be correct-

    Single Date Rate - SDRAM

    Double Date Rate - DDR and DDR2

    Triple Date Rate - DDR3

    Slightly confused in this topic.


    SDRAM = Synchronous Dynamic Random Access memory
    DDR SDRAM = Double Data Rate (?) Synchronous Dynamic Random Access memory.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchronous_dynamic_random_access_memory <- Though I wouldn't use it as a source for academic purposes. It is a good starting point however for searching google on more reliable sources.
  5. camstang said:
    Thank you for your post.

    Would this be correct-

    Single Date Rate - SDRAM

    Double Date Rate - DDR and DDR2

    Triple Date Rate - DDR3

    Slightly confused in this topic.

    To make it simple, DDR means Double Data Rate. Therefore DDR, DDR2 and DDR3 are double data rate.
  6. Okay, thanks much. But what about TDR? Triple Date Rate?
  7. camstang said:
    Okay, thanks much. But what about TDR? Triple Date Rate?

    Where is it used? On mainframes?
  8. Same question, this is for my mid-term exam for my Computer Maintenance Course, so I need as much details on this TDR as possible. ( my instructor is giving us all first half of the year to write it, thank god. )
  9. Are you sure that you're not confusing triple channel and TDR (which doesn't seem to exist)?
  10. There is no triple data rate memory

    you have SDRAM which is synchronous dram.
    then DDR DDR2 and DDR3 are all double data rate.. (ddr2 and ddr3 support higher speed(mhz) is all)

    even memory like GDDR5 on high performance video cards is simply faster double data rate memory ..

    then of course you have single double and triple CHANNEL memory architectures.
  11. I know what you mean, where is this memory? The vocabulary section is the exact same this as that from CompTIA Strata Objectives list. So if its on CompTIA it must exist somewhere...

    The goal of my instructor is to have us all able to take this exam and pass it by the end of the course, as long as we all put some effort into this.
  12. Please help
  13. How can we help you? We can't convince you that TDR memory doesn't exist an you won't believe us. Why not ask your instructor where it can be found? After all you're paying him to teach you, aren't you?
  14. I definitely see the reference in the CompTIA Strata objectives, but that wouldn't be the first time their objectives came up wanting.
  15. Ok first of you know that all computer parts work with 1's and 0's. Power on = 1 and off = 0. Now RAM has a constant state of flux as well. Now first imagine a graft where you have ups and downs, tops and bottoms in perfect 90 degree angels and all line parts are the same length.
    SDRAM just processed info at the top part of the graph. Hens Single Data Rate.
    DDR processed info at the up and down parts (between tops and bottoms) of the graph. Hens Double Data Rate.
    QDR uses the ups, downs, tops and bottoms. Hens Quad Data Rate.
    Now the the way RAM stores that and processes it is very similar to HHD/SSD's. They also have sectors where data is stored and used.
    Now the command codes they use that I can not tell you.
  16. DRAM is DRAM is DRAM - DDR3 is the current revision and NO it doesn't mean Triple Data Rate --- DDR of it self stands for double data rate and 3 is the physical characteristics of the current model....By DOUBLE data rate this means the you take the TRUE FREQ of the DRAM say 800 times 2 to find the effective rate or 800 x2 = 1600 which is how the sticks are advertised 1333 (true 667 freq ), 1600 (800), 1866 (933), etc.....What you are prob thinking is channels a single stick (DIMM) is a 64bit device, when two sticks are set up in dual channel mode the MC (memory controller) sees it not as two individual 64 bit devices but as a single 128 bit device, hence dual channel and appr a 10-15% increase over single channel performance (with current Intel mobos the socket 1150 and 1155 are examples of dual channel mobos), Tri-channel goes up a step to 3 DIMMS/sticks being seen as a 192 bit device, this can be found on X58 chipset 1366 socket mobos, and finally you have quad channel which sees 4 sticks as a 256 bit device, this is found only in X79 chipset, socket 2011 mobos........hope this helps ;)
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