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I7 920, i7 860, or i5 750?

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  • Intel i7
  • Intel i5
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September 12, 2009 7:35:57 PM

Tom's did a series meant to compare the newly-introduced i7 860 and i5 750 a few days ago. I'm only an intermediate user, so a little bit of it was techno rambling mumbo jumbo to me, but I understood most of it. Tom's is recommending the i5 750 outright, and seems to be favoring the i7 860 over the i7 920 last. I'm just not sure what makes the i5 750 "so much better" than the other two. I've asked around before, and I see opinions on completely polar opposite sides of the spectrum. Some are saying that the i5 750 exceeds the i7 920's performance, citing the 750- and 860's superior turbo boost tech. Others are saying there is no reason to choose a 750 over a 920, citing the i7's hyperthreading. I am at a lack for where to go next.

For a 750 cpu/mobo combo you will apparently spend notably less than a comparable 920/860 cpu/mobo combo. I do not know how true this is. Fry's is having a sale on i7 920's today for 225 dollars, and the best price I will find on an i5 is prob 199 dollars. For a mobo, will I be able to get a nice one at a good price for either of these? There really can't be THAT much price difference, and due to the roughly equal number of opinions favoring one side over the other, I tend to believe that there truly can't be that big of a difference if it is so arguable.

More about : 920 860 750

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September 12, 2009 7:57:08 PM

Trust me get the i7 920. x58 runs 2x 16x lanes, p55 runs 2x 8x lanes.:( 
x58 ddr3 triple channel
p55 ddr3 dual channel:( 
i5 has no hyperthreading:( 
p55 will not support 6 core 8 core cpus only socket 1366 will support them.
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September 13, 2009 8:33:12 AM

trepanation said:
I'm just not sure what makes the i5 750 "so much better" than the other two.

When you do, you will know. There are some absolutes, such as numerous bench testing results to compare, then there are the variables, such as current pricing, then the subjectives, such as personal taste or choice.

Some benchmark results may not impact on your choice of use. That is, the percentage or fps difference between two or more configuations may go unnoticed or their potential unused. An absurd example is someone with the latest and greatest machine just for checking emails.

What is your intended use?

trepanation said:
I've asked around before, and I see opinions on completely polar opposite sides of the spectrum. Some are saying that the i5 750 exceeds the i7 920's performance, citing the 750- and 860's superior turbo boost tech. Others are saying there is no reason to choose a 750 over a 920, citing the i7's hyperthreading. I am at a lack for where to go next.

Does it matter to you why one is better then the other? If so, you've not said in what way or capacity it needs to be better and why this is important to you.

Most will just say "I'm playing this game and I need X fps. Looking at these processors and motherboards, what's best?" or similar.

The i5-750 produces a certain result (pick your benchmark or application) and is priced at a certain priced, now assume the other platforms produce 10% and 20% more result and are 10% and 20% more expensive, respectively. Which will you buy?

You've asked around, been given opinions and have determined " There really can't be THAT much price difference".

Ok, assume all three are the same price. Which one will you buy? For what reason?

Of course, they're not exactly at the same price, so pick some benchmarks that reflect your intended use, then rank the three systems or processors based on that. Forget about opinions for now. Get some prices and put along side the rankings. Is the the highest rank the most expensive, the lowest the least?

If so, does your budget restrict the purchase? Yes - buy what you can afford. No - buy the highest and most expensive.

If the ranks and prices don't line up, then there is a buying opportunity there. One of them is providing better bang-for-buck. Probably go with that, unless budget restricts, then go with what you can afford (as before).

trepanation said:
...and due to the roughly equal number of opinions favoring one side over the other, I tend to believe that there truly can't be that big of a difference if it is so arguable.


If that is true, pick one at random. It won't matter. While ever you're basing you purchasing decision on a poll you are conducting consisting of other people's opinion that's producig a evenly split result, then any choice will be the right one.

Or will it?
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September 13, 2009 11:48:57 AM

get the 920 at microcenter
September 13, 2009 11:59:24 AM

Hi guys if i were you i would wait a bit with i7 920 cause i bought a i7 920 with intel dx58so and on stock cooling it has abbout 83C on load with prime 95 so if you are going to use a seperate cooler thermalright 120 ultra or something like that than you shuold buy the 920 because you can get him even faster than the i7 975 extreme ^^

hope this could help..if i also may ask what mobo are you going to buy
September 13, 2009 2:04:47 PM

It is true that that the i5 and new i7s are less expensive, and they DO have better turbo boost.... my main problem with them is that they DON'T support triple channel memory. Also, I have only seen a couple of 1156 mobos that have 6 RAM slots, while almost every 1366 I have seen has had 6 RAM slots, therefore allowing much greater amounts of memory.

The two major pluses to the 1156 CPUs that I have seen are: 1. Substantially less expensive, and 2. have much greater turbo-boost abilities (allowing applications that only use 1-2 cores, which are the most abundant currently, to run faster. The only thing is that this won't help as much with applications that utilize all 4 cores.)

I think that if I had to choose between an i7 920 or a new i5 or i7s, I would choose the 920.

But yea.... could somebody direct me to the article on here with the i5 vs. i7 benchmarks? I saw it one time and have been unable to re-locate it.
September 13, 2009 2:10:00 PM

ok so ehm thats not true the i7 920 i am speaking about has a ability of tripple channel it is socket 1366.but ask your self a question how does it go a quad core with tripple channel!! it has no sence but is still faster . so if you want to buy something then buy the dx58so extreme mobo withj i7 920 it has just 4 ram slots but who cares do you need for gaming and such things more than 3 GB ddr3 on 32 bit NO! and do you need at 64bit system more than 6gb well yes if you run a server ^^ so 3gb on 32 bit are enaugh and 4 slots also beside you will just use 3 of them

hope this could help and sry for agressive writing a bit under stress^^

greets laluma22
September 13, 2009 2:31:26 PM

Well true, in some cases, but it really depends on what you are using it for. I use my computer for 3D rendering, so it helps to have as much RAM as possible.

But even if I was using a computer just for gaming, I would like to have as many RAM slots as possible so it would be more future-resistant, as well as being able to support more RAM for multitasking (I do quite a bit of that).
September 13, 2009 2:34:40 PM

well elekctrogoofy i dont think that someone will use more than 6gb because 5gb for games on 64 bit are still enaugh^^
well i also were wondering what system he is using 32bit or 64 bit because for 32 bit 3gb are enaugh.

greets laluma22
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September 13, 2009 2:50:29 PM

trepanation said:
Tom's did a series meant to compare the newly-introduced i7 860 and i5 750 a few days ago. I'm only an intermediate user, so a little bit of it was techno rambling mumbo jumbo to me, but I understood most of it. Tom's is recommending the i5 750 outright, and seems to be favoring the i7 860 over the i7 920 last. I'm just not sure what makes the i5 750 "so much better" than the other two. I've asked around before, and I see opinions on completely polar opposite sides of the spectrum. Some are saying that the i5 750 exceeds the i7 920's performance, citing the 750- and 860's superior turbo boost tech. Others are saying there is no reason to choose a 750 over a 920, citing the i7's hyperthreading. I am at a lack for where to go next.

For a 750 cpu/mobo combo you will apparently spend notably less than a comparable 920/860 cpu/mobo combo. I do not know how true this is. Fry's is having a sale on i7 920's today for 225 dollars, and the best price I will find on an i5 is prob 199 dollars. For a mobo, will I be able to get a nice one at a good price for either of these? There really can't be THAT much price difference, and due to the roughly equal number of opinions favoring one side over the other, I tend to believe that there truly can't be that big of a difference if it is so arguable.


Well it depends on what you'll use it for. If it just going to be used for email and web surfing then i would say I5. If it going to be gaming that only going to use 1 graphic card the the get the I7 8xx's. If your going to need 2 graphic cards for a game and/or need max ram bandwidth for memory intensive programs then the I7 9xx's cpu's.

Here's some pros and cons to each CPU series.

I5:
Pros:
Cheap cpu.
Great turbo
Will get the job done for most to all programs.
Runs cooler than the I7 9xx's
Can run faster 1333 MHZ ram than the I7 9xx's.

Cons:
No HT
No triple channel memory
Doesn't have full dual 16x bandwidth for 2 video cards.
Will not be upgradable with 6+ core cpus.

I7 8xx's
(pretty much the same as i5's)

Pro's:
HT
Can be cheaper than the 9xx's (depending on locations and store)

I7 9xx's:
Pro's:
Triple channel memory
HT
full Dual 16X video bandwidth.
upgrade option down the road to the Core i9 when you need 6 cores

Con's:
Can be expensive. (depeding on location and store)
can be very hot if not in a well ventilated case.
Can only run 1066 MHz ram unless over clock to fully use cheaper 1333 MHz.
not as powerful turbo as the i5 and i7 8xx's cpus.

Well i hope this helps.
September 13, 2009 2:54:15 PM

laluma22 said:
well elekctrogoofy i dont think that someone will use more than 6gb because 5gb for games on 64 bit are still enaugh^^
well i also were wondering what system he is using 32bit or 64 bit because for 32 bit 3gb are enaugh.

greets laluma22


This is true, currently 6 gigs is enough, but what I was meaning was that IMO I would prefer more slots to make it more future-resistant, but yea, I get where you're coming from :) 
September 13, 2009 3:04:53 PM

yep i hope that we could help that one who opened this thread^^

greets laluma22
September 13, 2009 9:58:07 PM

warmon6 said:
Well it depends on what you'll use it for. If it just going to be used for email and web surfing then i would say I5. If it going to be gaming that only going to use 1 graphic card the the get the I7 8xx's. If your going to need 2 graphic cards for a game and/or need max ram bandwidth for memory intensive programs then the I7 9xx's cpu's.

Here's some pros and cons to each CPU series.

I5:
Pros:
Cheap cpu.
Great turbo
Will get the job done for most to all programs.
Runs cooler than the I7 9xx's
Can run faster 1333 MHZ ram than the I7 9xx's.

Cons:
No HT
No triple channel memory
Doesn't have full dual 16x bandwidth for 2 video cards.
Will not be upgradable with 6+ core cpus.

I7 8xx's
(pretty much the same as i5's)

Pro's:
HT
Can be cheaper than the 9xx's (depending on locations and store)

I7 9xx's:
Pro's:
Triple channel memory
HT
full Dual 16X video bandwidth.
upgrade option down the road to the Core i9 when you need 6 cores

Con's:
Can be expensive. (depeding on location and store)
can be very hot if not in a well ventilated case.
Can only run 1066 MHz ram unless over clock to fully use cheaper 1333 MHz.
not as powerful turbo as the i5 and i7 8xx's cpus.

Well i hope this helps.


Thank you, this explained things to me very well. I am now leaning towards an i7 860 as opposed to an i7 920. What's this about the 920 being unable to run RAM faster than 1300MHz, though? Does that mean that 1600MHz RAM will be unusable? If not, does that mean there is absolutely no difference between 1300 and 1600 RAM? Does it make a difference to the motherboard or any other parts? Because I know I've read that some people are running RAM higher than 2100 MHz with their i7's and that confuses me a little bit.

So now I guess I'm going to change my build around to befit an i7 860 a little better. Is the transition of 1366 mobo - 1156 mobo a bad thing?
September 13, 2009 10:33:08 PM

ehm... if you buy a i7 920 than you will be able to use ram with 1066 133 1600 and 1800 and 2000 but their sped will be just on fsb 1066 cause the fsb of i7 920 is 1066 so in any case you will have to overclock the speed a bit if you want 1600 or 1333
September 14, 2009 12:07:54 AM

daship is right on the money, short and sweet. Get the i7 920.
September 14, 2009 12:17:00 AM

yobigd20 is rigt get the i7 920 with intel dx58so extreme series you wont have any probs the next years you can easily overclock to 4x3,0Ghz with stock and with a aftermarket like thermalright 120 ultra to 4x3,988Ghz
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September 14, 2009 1:11:59 AM

trepanation said:
Thank you, this explained things to me very well. I am now leaning towards an i7 860 as opposed to an i7 920. What's this about the 920 being unable to run RAM faster than 1300MHz, though? Does that mean that 1600MHz RAM will be unusable? If not, does that mean there is absolutely no difference between 1300 and 1600 RAM? Does it make a difference to the motherboard or any other parts? Because I know I've read that some people are running RAM higher than 2100 MHz with their i7's and that confuses me a little bit.

So now I guess I'm going to change my build around to befit an i7 860 a little better. Is the transition of 1366 mobo - 1156 mobo a bad thing?


You can get faster ram but the cpu will just underclock it to 1333 Mhz or 1066 mhz.


"Is the transition of 1366 mobo - 1156 mobo a bad thing?"

No. It not a bad thing. it just mean that the I7 860 will fill your need.
September 14, 2009 10:21:43 AM

yeah probably your right but as i saw right now the i7 860 is at 2320-262€ boxed or bulk^^

but the i7 920 is at 239 box so this 7€ would be worth taking a 920 it is faster but it has just 2,66ghz the 860 2,80ghz but who cares the i7 920 is still faster so if these 7 € are not a problem take it.

greets laluma22

wont be a prob to overclock
September 14, 2009 11:52:11 AM

Another pro and con


Power Consumption:

i7 920 130W TDP

i5-750 95 W TDP
i7-860 "
i7-870 "

Thats around 26.9% difference.
.......................................................................................................

When overclocking these cpu's by 1200 MHz , expected power consumption to go up by 45%.

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September 14, 2009 11:54:35 AM

ibnsina said:
Another pro and con


Power Consumption:

i7 920 130W TDP

i5-750 95 W TDP
i7-860 "
i7-870 "

Thats around 26.9% difference.
.......................................................................................................

When overclocking these cpu's by 1200 MHz , expected power consumption to go up by 45%.


nice catch.
September 14, 2009 12:18:37 PM

if you read warmon6 his tread it was about i7 860 and about my conclusion i7 920 never spoke about i5. i5 is in tread mentioned but not by me i just concludde that it is better to buy a i7 920 than a i7 860 (differenc 7€) of course i5 is better to overclock but also has not turboboost etc.

so he will always gett better oc with i5 but he will gain also with less oc on i7 920 better performance

greets laluma22
September 15, 2009 1:47:24 AM

Didn't see many i7 860 benchmarks, I'm still not sure if 920 or 860 is the best cpu to buy at this time! can't make my mind :) 
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September 15, 2009 1:58:33 AM

laluma22 said:
if you read warmon6 his tread it was about i7 860 and about my conclusion i7 920 never spoke about i5. i5 is in tread mentioned but not by me i just concludde that it is better to buy a i7 920 than a i7 860 (differenc 7€) of course i5 is better to overclock but also has not turboboost etc.

so he will always gett better oc with i5 but he will gain also with less oc on i7 920 better performance

greets laluma22


well the I5, i7 8xx's, and i7 9xx were all mentioned in the first post and in the title of the thread. so instead of saying 920 is the best option (which is what i would get if i was getting cpu atm) I just made a pro and cons list of each cpu and let him decide what is best for him.
September 15, 2009 3:35:11 AM

trepanation said:
Tom's did a series meant to compare the newly-introduced i7 860 and i5 750 a few days ago. I'm only an intermediate user, so a little bit of it was techno rambling mumbo jumbo to me, but I understood most of it. Tom's is recommending the i5 750 outright, and seems to be favoring the i7 860 over the i7 920 last. I'm just not sure what makes the i5 750 "so much better" than the other two. I've asked around before, and I see opinions on completely polar opposite sides of the spectrum. Some are saying that the i5 750 exceeds the i7 920's performance, citing the 750- and 860's superior turbo boost tech. Others are saying there is no reason to choose a 750 over a 920, citing the i7's hyperthreading. I am at a lack for where to go next.

For a 750 cpu/mobo combo you will apparently spend notably less than a comparable 920/860 cpu/mobo combo. I do not know how true this is. Fry's is having a sale on i7 920's today for 225 dollars, and the best price I will find on an i5 is prob 199 dollars. For a mobo, will I be able to get a nice one at a good price for either of these? There really can't be THAT much price difference, and due to the roughly equal number of opinions favoring one side over the other, I tend to believe that there truly can't be that big of a difference if it is so arguable.

Well like I have said in a ton of other threads it really comes down to what you plan on using your build for. Here's the things you need to to take into account man.

In the benchmarking testing that AnandTech Completed they had the Intel core i7 860 in first place and the Intel Core i7 920 in second place then the Intel core i5 750 in third place. In pretty much every single Video game benchmark they ran. Keep in mind though this is while they where using a single graphics card set-up.

Basically though for the most part in all the benchmarks they did neither of the processors was totally killing the other one. So I mean really the big advantage to using a 1156 socket type for your build is the fact that you will save money and still have a fast PC. But if it was up to me I would pick the i7 920 simply because it uses the 1366 socket type man, cause think about it when Intel comes out with 6 core stuff or when they finish gulf town and the i9 comes out and then the prices on their older i7 extremes drop because of the 6core's hitting the market you would end up being very happy you stuck with the i7 920 with the 1366 socket. I know you would. But heck that's just my two cents.

Now yes the Intel core i5 750 is a very fast chip and the new turbo it has is great, but honestly man if I was you I would go with the Intel core i7 920. Simply because of the fact that it uses the 1366 socket, and with the 1366 socket you'll be able to run SLI or Crossfire graphics card set-ups and get the most out of it. Plus your system will have much more chance for updatability in the long run.
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September 16, 2009 5:56:49 PM

daship said:
Trust me get the i7 920. x58 runs 2x 16x lanes, p55 runs 2x 8x lanes.:( 
x58 ddr3 triple channel
p55 ddr3 dual channel:( 
i5 has no hyperthreading:( 
p55 will not support 6 core 8 core cpus only socket 1366 will support them.


hehe, like anyone is going to really need a 6/8 core CPU.... until there is actual software that can handle such cores, those CPU's will be worthless..... I see many peeps here on Toms that have the 920 and use it for surfing the net and casual gaming, so in all they spent more money then they really needed... And then you have a few peeps that actually take full advantage of the CPU.... The 920/x58 is a great platform if the OP is going to render, encode, try and break a record, etc..... If this is not the case then then he would be better off with i5 and the money saved....
September 16, 2009 7:39:10 PM

of course the 920 is the most futureproof, but something to really consider is when buying 1366 cpu, they run HOT; make sure you buy a better HSF than stock. I'm looking at a new build myself and the biggest turnoff for the 1366 for me is heat. This is mostly due to the fact that I like having a relatively small case for easy portability (mATX).

If I were to use a full size ATX, I'd consider 1366, but for now I'm leaning toward the 860.

Oh, BTW, I'm not one to buy sli/crossfire (mATX case issue again) so the x8 x8 limitation isn't an issue for me.
September 16, 2009 9:13:12 PM

860 offer better performance for now? and will still be very good in 1-2years, after that theres gonna be new sockets right! Why thinking upgrades? And who said LGA1156 wasn't getting more i7 or even a cheaper i9 in the futur?
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September 16, 2009 9:55:36 PM

You really cannot assume that the 1336 socket is more "future proof" than the 1156, the dam socket just came out and we will have it for several years to come.. Just cause the i9 will only work on 1336 does not mean that by purhasing the 1156 you will eventually hit a wall....Intel will eventualy release more CPU's to to the i5 and i7 line (1156).... Not everyone will have the cash nor really need an i9 regardless of what the fanboys say.....It's like buying a Lamborgini Gallardo when you live in the mountains, what you really need a HUMMER!!!!!
September 16, 2009 10:37:58 PM

OvrClkr said:
hehe, like anyone is going to really need a 6/8 core CPU.... until there is actual software that can handle such cores, those CPU's will be worthless..... I see many peeps here on Toms that have the 920 and use it for surfing the net and casual gaming, so in all they spent more money then they really needed... And then you have a few peeps that actually take full advantage of the CPU.... The 920/x58 is a great platform if the OP is going to render, encode, try and break a record, etc..... If this is not the case then then he would be better off with i5 and the money saved....

Very truthfull statement about most people not really even needing a Intel core i7 serious CPU. I know for myself personally my i7 920 system (Once I finish it and get to use it) will be much more power than I actually need. The reason I'm doing it though is for the times when I do actually get a break from college/work and get a chance to really just sit and game. I don't really play anything that requires a i7 920 though obviously so your for sure right about a lot of people buying them that really don't even need them, because like I said I know I won't even need mine but I just bought it simply because it was out.

I know a lot of people who often times buy and build new systems not because they actually need it, but simply because they love having the newest and or best technology out and are just simply into having high-tech stuff. My father is the perfect example of that.

Here's a example my dad's current system has a AMD Phenom II x4 955BE CPU with 4 gigs of RAM and he seriously does nothing besides use Mozilla firefox to check his email. But he has his friend build him a new system every year or so simply because he doesn't like using what he calls "slow computers like from his work" Lol...
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September 16, 2009 11:54:01 PM

That makes sense, but when I say go with a lesser CPU/platform what I try explain is the fact that it suits well to someone that is on a budget and will perform regular daily tasks as opposed to someone that really needs all that power for their computing needs. Here is another example, I have built and used several systems that smoke my PC in a split second.... Of course the cost of the PC was much higher, but my main focus was to see if I really needed that much power for my daily tasks... I came to the conclusion that I don't need a 920 or a 965 just cause there was no difference when both platforms were compared.. The quads are faster when you render, encode, cinibench, play poorly coded games like GTA4, etc... My PC is used for Monitoring the house, play Crysis, Warhead, L4D, CoD2/4 and soon 6, store music and movies, make cd's and dvd's, post on Tom's, etc.... My CPU lets me do all those things at 3.6Ghz+ and I am not complaining....
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September 17, 2009 12:22:39 AM

laluma22 said:
ehm... if you buy a i7 920 than you will be able to use ram with 1066 133 1600 and 1800 and 2000 but their sped will be just on fsb 1066 cause the fsb of i7 920 is 1066 so in any case you will have to overclock the speed a bit if you want 1600 or 1333

i7 has no front side bus. It will happily use RAM at whatever speed that RAM is rated for.
September 17, 2009 1:48:12 AM

Best cpu at this moment would be i7 860 , or i5 for low budget (-100$)
September 17, 2009 6:39:01 AM

Either those two or if you have a micro center near you can get the Intel Core i7'920 for just 199.99. Which is a killer deal.
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September 17, 2009 1:11:35 PM

I bought a Lynnfield chip for the following reasons:
1. The dual channel vs. triple channel memory has showed very little difference even in benchmarks (other than synthetic bandwidth tests)
2. I don't see the need (yet) to get more than a Quad core chip, especially when one could HT up to simulate 8 cores (i7 860 & 870)
3. The total cost of ownership is lower (i.e. power requirements are less for the 1156 chips, especially at idle)
4. The difference in SLI/Crossfire PCIe lanes running at x8, x8 vs. x16, x16 has not shown to be terribly significant except at highest resolutions - and more importantly for me I don't planning on running SLI/Crossfire
5. I felt like I could get more for my money - less RAM, less PSU therefore better components for same price or same relative components for cheaper price

I picked an i7 860 over the i5 750 because:
1. I wanted Hyper-Threading (not necessarily needed, but really wanted)
2. This is replacing my near 10 year old P4 1.5ghz machine and I want it to last / feel 'quick' as long as possible
3. I have access to a MicroCenter


But the most important factor in deciding which way to go is, what matters most to you?
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2009 2:36:09 PM

Exactly, that is a more detailed explanation for your decision....

Another thing I like about the new CPU's is the fact that you dont have to worry about getting the wrong stepping... I know a few here on Toms that complain about this issue and to be frank, if I pay almost 300.00$ for a CPU I would expect more than a guaranteed 3.5Ghz....

The 860 overclocks to 4.0Ghz without breaking a sweat...In my book that is a well priced CPU =)
September 17, 2009 3:50:37 PM

well guys about the memory think of it what is intel doing? a i7 with tripple channel does not make sence 4vs3???! well a quadcore with tripple channel does not make any sence they should have made the 900 series of i7 olso dual channel or wait to make a quadrichannel but 4cores and tripple channel ???!!

Think about it ^^
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2009 4:04:34 PM

ummm what?

re-phrase that please =)
September 17, 2009 5:01:57 PM

it's 4vs3 but the cpu and memory doesn't need to be coordinated on let's say 4vs4
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2009 6:22:55 PM

Still makes no sense..... normally this is called "non-sense"....lol
September 17, 2009 8:14:08 PM

OvrClkr said:
Still makes no sense..... normally this is called "non-sense"....lol

indeed
a b à CPUs
September 17, 2009 8:22:15 PM

must be cryptic :lol: 
September 18, 2009 2:21:24 PM

ehm i did not think about coordinating but on that that you could but faster memory like quadrichannel and sry from writing in crptic^^
September 18, 2009 11:07:50 PM

Okay I'm officially lost but to be honest my tech level is only above average and not anywhere near a lot of peoples so I'm not gonna question it lol...
September 19, 2009 7:42:35 PM

sry i was a bit ehm sleepy^^
a b à CPUs
September 19, 2009 8:59:45 PM

basically you want quad core cpu combined with quad channel memory.
October 4, 2009 11:41:24 AM

the i7's 9xx run tripple channel. 2 banks of 3.
6 slots in total.
the i7 8xx and the i5 run 2 banks of 2
4 slots total
hope i cleared this up for anyone
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