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Wireless network question

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Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 15, 2004 6:29:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Hi everyone,

I just bought a dell Cxp 500 piii/128/11gig hd for my wife. We
have two desktops routed to dsl by a wired Linksys ethernet router.
Initially I planned to add an ethernet card to the dell and simply
wire it to the network. Then I read about usb/ethernet adapters. Those
sounded good. But I see that Linksys offers wireless routers with
ports for wired links, and J & R sells a kit for $99 that includes a
wireless router and one wireless pcmcia with a max of 11 Mbps. That
sounded like an option, because I wouldn't have to alter the two
desktops--though it is slighly more costly than simply buying a usb
adapter and some cable.

Any comments on which would be better?

My wife plans to use the laptops in a couple different
locations, each pretty close to the router. But we have two open ports
on our existing setup, so running cable's not a problem.

I also wonder whether it's worth the investment to spend an
extra $50.00 to buy this wireless g router & card that boast a max of
54 mbps ... our internet provider is earthlink dsl. My wife does link
to her office computer via a website, so would the extra speed be
worthwhile?

The laptop will be running Win 98 SE.

TIA for any advice,

Andy Katz
***************************************************************
Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.

Paghat, the Rat Girl

amkatz@earthlink.net
andrewk271@aol.net
April 15, 2004 6:29:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Well, your DSL connection is probably 1 mbps, so the extra speed would
only be useful if you send large files between your computers
frequently. Any communication via the internet will still be limited
by the DSL speed.

I personally favor the wireless solution for the laptop. It gives you
much more freedom and flexibility than a wired connection. And I
personally don't care for the USB option. I have read mixed reviews
about quality, reliability, etc. of such devices. Someone else may
have first hand experience and could you better advice about that
option. Finally, $99 is not a bad price for a wireless/wired router
and a PCMCIA wireless adapter. Just make sure the kit is from one of
the name network equipment vendors. (Linksys, D-link, Netgear, etc.)

Regards and good luck, hawk

Andy Katz wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> I just bought a dell Cxp 500 piii/128/11gig hd for my wife. We
> have two desktops routed to dsl by a wired Linksys ethernet router.
> Initially I planned to add an ethernet card to the dell and simply
> wire it to the network. Then I read about usb/ethernet adapters. Those
> sounded good. But I see that Linksys offers wireless routers with
> ports for wired links, and J & R sells a kit for $99 that includes a
> wireless router and one wireless pcmcia with a max of 11 Mbps. That
> sounded like an option, because I wouldn't have to alter the two
> desktops--though it is slighly more costly than simply buying a usb
> adapter and some cable.
>
> Any comments on which would be better?
>
> My wife plans to use the laptops in a couple different
> locations, each pretty close to the router. But we have two open ports
> on our existing setup, so running cable's not a problem.
>
> I also wonder whether it's worth the investment to spend an
> extra $50.00 to buy this wireless g router & card that boast a max of
> 54 mbps ... our internet provider is earthlink dsl. My wife does link
> to her office computer via a website, so would the extra speed be
> worthwhile?
>
> The laptop will be running Win 98 SE.
>
> TIA for any advice,
>
> Andy Katz
> ***************************************************************
> Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
> while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
> that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
> the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.
>
> Paghat, the Rat Girl
>
> amkatz@earthlink.net
> andrewk271@aol.net
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 15, 2004 6:29:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

Andy Katz wrote:
> I just bought a dell Cxp 500 piii/128/11gig hd for my wife. We
> have two desktops routed to dsl by a wired Linksys ethernet router.
> Initially I planned to add an ethernet card to the dell and simply
> wire it to the network. Then I read about usb/ethernet adapters.
> Those sounded good. But I see that Linksys offers wireless routers
> with ports for wired links, and J & R sells a kit for $99 that includes
> a wireless router and one wireless pcmcia with a max of 11 Mbps.
> That sounded like an option, because I wouldn't have to alter the
> two desktops--though it is slighly more costly than simply buying a
> usb adapter and some cable.
>
> Any comments on which would be better?
>
> My wife plans to use the laptops in a couple different
> locations, each pretty close to the router. But we have two open ports
> on our existing setup, so running cable's not a problem.

Wireless would give your wife the option of using her notebook anywhere in
or around the house, not just in a couple of fixed locations. I really like
that flexibility, but only you can decide if it's worth the extra cost.

Note that most wireless routers let you disable the router function and use
them as straight access points. Then you could keep your existing wired
router in the loop. So it doesn't really matter if the wireless router has
Ethernet LAN ports or not. You can even get wireless access points that are
not routers, but they're generally no cheaper than wireless routers.

> I also wonder whether it's worth the investment to spend an
> extra $50.00 to buy this wireless g router & card that boast a max
> of 54 mbps ... our internet provider is earthlink dsl. My wife does
> link to her office computer via a website, so would the extra speed
> be worthwhile?

For Internet access (including your wife's connection to her office
network), it will make no difference at all. Your DSL line is slower than
either kind of wireless. Where the extra speed will help is when you copy
files from one of your computers to another across the wireless, or print to
a shared printer.

-Mike
Related resources
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 15, 2004 9:38:32 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 09:12:15 -0700, "Michael Geary"
<Mike@DeleteThis.Geary.com> wrote:

>> My wife plans to use the laptops in a couple different
>> locations, each pretty close to the router. But we have two open ports
>> on our existing setup, so running cable's not a problem.
>
>Wireless would give your wife the option of using her notebook anywhere in
>or around the house, not just in a couple of fixed locations. I really like
>that flexibility, but only you can decide if it's worth the extra cost.

I'm thinking it probably is, because the alternative would be to set
up two cables--maybe total cost would only be half the router/card
set, but the convenience and impossibility of losing one cable end
outweigh that.

>Note that most wireless routers let you disable the router function and use
>them as straight access points. Then you could keep your existing wired
>router in the loop. So it doesn't really matter if the wireless router has
>Ethernet LAN ports or not. You can even get wireless access points that are
>not routers, but they're generally no cheaper than wireless routers.

So I would place the wireless router *between* the DSL modem and the
cabled router, using an additional standard phone line cable to
complete the link between wired and wireless router?

>> I also wonder whether it's worth the investment to spend an
>> extra $50.00 to buy this wireless g router & card that boast a max
>> of 54 mbps ... our internet provider is earthlink dsl. My wife does
>> link to her office computer via a website, so would the extra speed
>> be worthwhile?
>
>For Internet access (including your wife's connection to her office
>network), it will make no difference at all. Your DSL line is slower than
>either kind of wireless. Where the extra speed will help is when you copy
>files from one of your computers to another across the wireless, or print to
>a shared printer.

Thanks. I thought there might be a bottleneck somewhere along the line
that would make the extra speed irrelevant. I don't think we'll need
for local use, either.

Thanks for the advice, Mike:-)

Andy Katz
***************************************************************
Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.

Paghat, the Rat Girl

amkatz@earthlink.net
andrewk271@aol.net
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 15, 2004 9:38:33 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

> > Note that most wireless routers let you disable the router function
> > and use them as straight access points. Then you could keep your
> > existing wired router in the loop. So it doesn't really matter if the
> > wireless router has Ethernet LAN ports or not. You can even get
> > wireless access points that are not routers, but they're generally
> > no cheaper than wireless routers.
>
> So I would place the wireless router *between* the DSL modem
> and the cabled router, using an additional standard phone line
> cable to complete the link between wired and wireless router?

No, you would always connect a router (one router or another) to your DSL
modem (using an Ethernet cable, not a phone cable). Anything else you hook
up goes on the LAN side of that router.

Your wired DSL router is really two machines in one, connected internally:

router <--> hub/switch

A typical wireless router is three machines in one:

router <--> hub/switch <--> wireless access point

Now, you can always connect one hub/switch to another yourself:

hub/switch <--> hub/switch

All I was saying is that most wireless routers let you disable the router
function completely, giving you a machine like this:

hub/switch <--> wireless access point

This lets you connect the two boxes together, in effect giving you this
configuration:

router <--> hub/switch <--> another hub/switch <--> wireless access point

Sometimes it can be useful to do that. But for your purposes, it will
probably be simpler to forget everything I just said, unplug your existing
wired router, and use your new wireless router for the whole thing. I just
mentioned this other configuration as another option.

-Mike
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 15, 2004 9:40:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 08:18:06 -0700, hawk <hawk@spamex.com> wrote:

>Well, your DSL connection is probably 1 mbps, so the extra speed would
>only be useful if you send large files between your computers
>frequently. Any communication via the internet will still be limited
>by the DSL speed.
>
>I personally favor the wireless solution for the laptop. It gives you
>much more freedom and flexibility than a wired connection. And I
>personally don't care for the USB option. I have read mixed reviews
>about quality, reliability, etc. of such devices. Someone else may
>have first hand experience and could you better advice about that
>option. Finally, $99 is not a bad price for a wireless/wired router
>and a PCMCIA wireless adapter. Just make sure the kit is from one of
>the name network equipment vendors. (Linksys, D-link, Netgear, etc.)

Thanks for the advice, Hawk. Yeah, the router/adapter set is all
Linksys, which we're already using for the desktops.

Also, I suspected there might be a bottleneck somewhere that would
make the additional speed unnecessary.

Much appreciated....;-)

Andy Katz

***************************************************************
Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.

Paghat, the Rat Girl

amkatz@earthlink.net
andrewk271@aol.net
Anonymous
a b D Laptop
April 15, 2004 11:35:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.laptops (More info?)

On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 11:30:19 -0700, "Michael Geary"
<Mike@DeleteThis.Geary.com> wrote:

>No, you would always connect a router (one router or another) to your DSL
>modem (using an Ethernet cable, not a phone cable). Anything else you hook
>up goes on the LAN side of that router.

I see. I'd forgotten that the DSL modem used ethernet cable to connect
to the router.

>Sometimes it can be useful to do that. But for your purposes, it will
>probably be simpler to forget everything I just said, unplug your existing
>wired router, and use your new wireless router for the whole thing. I just
>mentioned this other configuration as another option.

Thanks for the diagramming. It does clarify things. And I think you're
right about simply replacing one unit with another;-)

Andy Katz
***************************************************************
Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.

Paghat, the Rat Girl

amkatz@earthlink.net
andrewk271@aol.net
!