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Regarding the EVGA 9600 GT Low Power Video Card, is the 300v power supply good e

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September 16, 2009 8:20:56 PM

I have a couple of questions regarding this recent purchase I just made. ( and I am by no means a computer techie! ) Its the EVGA Nvidia GeForce 9600 GT Low Power Edition card. I recently bought Champions Online and found the integrated card that went with my HP Pavillion was useless, so I purchased this spanking brand new one.

Two things cropped up in the course of playing the game : The game itself works GREAT! The graphics are awesome, and everything else seems to run just fine. There might be one or two things that might be a bit off, but it might not be the issue at hand.

I purchased the video card knowing that it requires a 350v Power supply, and I have a 300v Power supply. I have done some research and found that it CAN run with a 300v Power supply... I hope they are right about that.

The 2nd question at issue is I DLed Speedfan, to check the temperatures of the computer. The GPU while sitting idle or surfing the web is around 55-60c, and while playing the game its in the mid to high 70 range ( again, Celsius ). There's an icon next to the GPU temp that looks like a flame, im assuming it means the temp is running hot. Im concerned about this, and did some research on that as well. Ive had some mixed answers on this part.

What do you all think? Is my computer running too hot?? And is the 300v Power supply okay for the vid card im running?
September 16, 2009 8:26:23 PM

A GPU can handle 80C with ease, and it's nothing to worry about.

300W, or 350W it doesn't matter as long as the power supply has enough wattage on the 12V rail, but I need full system specs to tell you how much need.
September 16, 2009 8:36:17 PM

I have an AMD Phenom 9150 Quad Core Processor 1800 Mhz, its running a Windows Vista 64 Bit. Vid card is Geforce Nvidia 9600 GT Low Power. The motherboard is an ECS Nettle3 2.2. Other than opening up the case physically and looking, where can I look for how many wattages I have on the 12v Rail?
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September 16, 2009 8:44:35 PM

Acemeister said:
I have an AMD Phenom 9150 Quad Core Processor 1800 Mhz, its running a Windows Vista 64 Bit. Vid card is Geforce Nvidia 9600 GT Low Power. The motherboard is an ECS Nettle3 2.2. Other than opening up the case physically and looking, where can I look for how many wattages I have on the 12v Rail?


The only way to be sure is to open the case and looking at the label on the PSU, how many hard drives and DVD drives do you have?
September 16, 2009 8:47:39 PM

I just checked Speedfan, it listed a bunch of numbers.. is this what you may be looking for in regards to wattage?

Vcore1 : 0.99v
Vcore2: 2.50v
+3.3V : 1.76v
+5V : 5.56v
+12V : 12.10v
September 16, 2009 8:49:07 PM

I have 1 hard drive, and 2 dvd/cd rom drives. Checking on the power supply momentarily... ill respond in a few :)  and thanks btw
September 16, 2009 8:49:29 PM

Acemeister said:
I just checked Speedfan, it listed a bunch of numbers.. is this what you may be looking for in regards to wattage?

Vcore1 : 0.99v
Vcore2: 2.50v
+3.3V : 1.76v
+5V : 5.56v
+12V : 12.10v


No, that doesn't say much about the wattage.
September 16, 2009 8:54:17 PM

Whoa.. okay i have a bunch of numbers here. First off its a Bestec, from what I see.... it says +5v and +12v is 268 Watt Max. The output is 300W Max. Lots of numbers here that i cant make heads nor tails of. lol
September 16, 2009 8:57:28 PM

Acemeister said:
Whoa.. okay i have a bunch of numbers here. First off its a Bestec, from what I see.... it says +5v and +12v is 268 Watt Max. The output is 300W Max. Lots of numbers here that i cant make heads nor tails of. lol


268W on the 12V rail is plenty for your system + 9600GT Low Power, you're good to go.
September 16, 2009 9:01:39 PM

So I dont need to upgrade to a 350v Power supply then? Awesome, thanks. Just for my own info, how did you arrive at that conclusion? Is there a guideline for this sort of thing, or how much wattage there should be before you need to upgrade to a better power supply? That sort of thing... The more Ive been researching up all these things, the more im interested in knowing the details about how a computer works :) 
a c 126 ) Power supply
September 16, 2009 9:14:20 PM

Brand and model of the PSU will be useful too. A Chokemax PSU's label is a lie, since pulling 75% of it will blow it up.
September 16, 2009 9:21:49 PM

Acemeister said:
So I dont need to upgrade to a 350v Power supply then? Awesome, thanks. Just for my own info, how did you arrive at that conclusion? Is there a guideline for this sort of thing, or how much wattage there should be before you need to upgrade to a better power supply? That sort of thing... The more Ive been researching up all these things, the more im interested in knowing the details about how a computer works :) 


Well, here are some guidelines:

1) Most of a PC's power runs through the 12V rail (the two most demanding parts, the CPU and the video card run almost exclusively on 12V.)

2) You want the system to never use more than 80% of the PSU's 12V capacity (some cheap PSU's will fail beyond 80%, but in general you just want some headroom and your PSU will last longer.)

3) The 3V and 5V rails are insignificant, unless you have 20 USB devices connected at the same time.

4) A PSU's efficiency is the ratio between what the PSU supplies and what it draws from the wall: 75% efficiency means that when your PSU is supplying 300W to your system it draws 400W from the wall.

5) PSU's with an "80Plus" certificate (80%, or more efficiency) are the best: they can supply every watt the label promises and will cut your electricity bill.

6) Calculate the 12V rail needs of the system in the following manner: TDP (this is the max power a component draws at 100% use and at stock speeds, it is usually among the specs) of CPU + TDP of GPU + 10W for every hard drive + 20W for every DVD drive + 5W for system fans. Multiply the result of this calculation by 10/8 because you want to stay under 80% load.

7) Exceptions: When overclocking a component it is safest to increase the TDP linearly with the amount of overclocking (this is a safe approximation): for example: you overclock a 65W CPU by 10% --> new TDP = 72W.
Multiple GPU's increase power consumption but not linearly (2 cards may, for example, together consume 1.5 times the power 1 card consumes), there's no definite rule for this, so bet on the safe side.

8) Always make sure a PSU has all the cables you need: don't forget to compare the number of PCI-E connectors and SATA connectors the PSU has against the needs of your system.

9) Quality brands are really worth it: they include Antec, Seasonic, Corsair and Coolermaster, but alway check for the "80Plus" certificate to be sure.
September 16, 2009 9:23:13 PM

Onus said:
Brand and model of the PSU will be useful too. A Chokemax PSU's label is a lie, since pulling 75% of it will blow it up.


I already accounted for that: he'll be lucky to even hit 70% with everything at 100% load and the DVD drive spinning up.
a c 248 ) Power supply
September 16, 2009 10:55:13 PM

We just had several similar threads recently. You have an HP slimline pc with an FTX (slimline) power supply rated at 300 watts. That is the best you can do in the USA. There are no other FTX power supplies with a higher wattage available. According to HP the PCI-e slot does not support high end video cards. However, your 9600GT low power video card will work fine with the 300 watt psu. That's as good as it gets. Enjoy what you have.
a c 145 ) Power supply
September 17, 2009 2:03:14 PM

Acemeister said:
I have a couple of questions regarding this recent purchase I just made. ( and I am by no means a computer techie! ) Its the EVGA Nvidia GeForce 9600 GT Low Power Edition card. I recently bought Champions Online and found the integrated card that went with my HP Pavillion was useless, so I purchased this spanking brand new one.

Two things cropped up in the course of playing the game : The game itself works GREAT! The graphics are awesome, and everything else seems to run just fine. There might be one or two things that might be a bit off, but it might not be the issue at hand.

I purchased the video card knowing that it requires a 350v Power supply, and I have a 300v Power supply. I have done some research and found that it CAN run with a 300v Power supply... I hope they are right about that.

The 2nd question at issue is I DLed Speedfan, to check the temperatures of the computer. The GPU while sitting idle or surfing the web is around 55-60c, and while playing the game its in the mid to high 70 range ( again, Celsius ). There's an icon next to the GPU temp that looks like a flame, im assuming it means the temp is running hot. Im concerned about this, and did some research on that as well. Ive had some mixed answers on this part.

What do you all think? Is my computer running too hot?? And is the 300v Power supply okay for the vid card im running?


You might want to edit your post. You have a 300W(watt) power supply, not a 300V(volt) unit.

1) The fact that your system runs fine, is primary evidence that the PSU is at least adequate.

2) In speedfan, you can configure the heat warning thresholds to whatever you want to eliminate the disturbing flames warnings. Graphics cards run hot, but they are built to handle it. Your temperatures look nominal; 80c. maximum is OK.

3) I suspect that your psu is not of good quality. It may be inefficient, and may not have good longevity. Still, don't change it out unless you encounter problems. If you see random lockups or video anomalies, that might be the first signs of trouble. If the psu fan spins up to maximum speed, that might also be a precourser to trouble.
Here is a tiered list of quality psu's for future reference:
http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx
a c 248 ) Power supply
September 17, 2009 3:51:28 PM

geofelt - the problem with that list is that the smaller FTX (slimline) power supplies required for the narrow cases are not listed. Maximum wattage available in the USA is 300 watts. A lot of the HP, Dell, and Compaq slimline cases are only about 4.7 inches wide.
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