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[GTX560 Superclocked DS Ti SLI] Newb here needs help

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  • Graphics Cards
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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June 1, 2011 11:16:35 PM

EDIT: Okay, so I switched out the Asrock p67 Extreme 4 for an Asus P8P67 Pro for $15 more, my question is, should I get a 16x/16x PCI-E MOBO if I want to be future proof? I want this computer to be very upgradeable

EDIT: Also, would it be unwise to try to overclock the Stock OC'ed GTX560 SC DS I will be getting in SLI?

Current build:

Computer case:
Cooler Master HAF X Full Tower w/ SuperSpeed USB 3.0 w/ Window w/ Black Interior ATX Case (RC-942-KKN1) ($200)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003S68Q0Y/ref=ox_sc_a...

CPU:
Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor ($225)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004EBUXHQ/ref=ox_sc_a...

CPU Fan:
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler, RR-B10-212P-G1 ($29)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002G1YPH0/ref=ox_sc_a...


GPU:
2 EVGA GeForce GTX 560 Ti DS Superclocked 1024 MB GDDR5 PCI-Express 2.0 Graphics Card 01G-P3-1567-KR ($500)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004XUCCRM



PSU:
Corsair Enthusiast Series 850-Watt 80 Plus Bronze Certified Power Supply compatible with Intel Core i3, i5, i7 and AMD platforms 850TX v2 ($135)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004MYFODS/ref=ox_sc_a...

RAM:
CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model ($90)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004QBUL1C/ref=ox_sc_a...

HardDrive:
Samsung Desktop Class Spinpoint F3 1 TB SATA 3.0 Gb-s 32 MB Cache 3.5-Inch Internal Bare-OEM Drives, HD103SJ ($60)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002MQC0P8/ref=ox_sc_a...


Motherboard:
ASUS P8P67 PRO LGA 1155 SATA 6Gbps and USB 3.0 Supported Intel P67 DDR3 2400 ATX Motherboard - ($175)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004QF0VD6

Monitor:
ASUS VH238H 23-Inch LED Monitor - Black

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004J6BIJ8


Operating System:
Windows 7 Home Premum 64 Bit System Builder 1pk [Old Version] ($100)

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002NGJO4M/ref=ox_sc_a...

More about : gtx560 superclocked sli newb

a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
June 2, 2011 1:17:52 AM

The bridge should be included with each GPU. To install the Hyper 212+, you'll need to remove the stock backplate under the CPU socket (bottom side of mobo). Also, since you'll need to have the mobo out of the case to install the HSF, you should do a breadboard. Doing a breadboard removes the common "case short" problem.

Before beginning your build, in or out of the case, make sure you touch bare metal to discharge any static electricity.

Breadboarding 101:

1. place mobo on a non-conductive surface (like the mobo box)
2. Connect the PSU (don't forget the P4/CPU connector)
3. Install just one stick of RAM (Check your manual for single stick placement)
4. Install just one GPU and connect the monitor
5. Install the CPU and the 212+
6. Jump the PWR_SW pins with a flathead screwdriver, or similar tool

This is the bare minimum setup. If the parts are all functional, you should see the Power On Self Test (POST) resulting with an error message regarding no boot device or no OS found. Ignore this message, and power off the system by jumping the PWR_SW pins again.

Remove the currently installed GPU, then install the other one in place of the first. Repeat step 6 above. If both GPUs showed POST, then add the second stick of RAM to enable dual channel. Repeat step 6.

If both sticks of RAM and both GPUs are functional, then proceed to build in the case, just don't remove the CPU/HSF and RAM.
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a b U Graphics card
a c 296 K Overclocking
June 2, 2011 1:47:18 PM

Solid rig.

The SLI Bridge comes with your mobo and not with the GPUs. Multi GPU bridges comes with mobos manufacturer, even, my current ASUS GPU doesn't came with that SLI bridge.
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June 3, 2011 1:12:22 AM

T_T said:
The bridge should be included with each GPU. To install the Hyper 212+, you'll need to remove the stock backplate under the CPU socket (bottom side of mobo). Also, since you'll need to have the mobo out of the case to install the HSF, you should do a breadboard. Doing a breadboard removes the common "case short" problem.

Before beginning your build, in or out of the case, make sure you touch bare metal to discharge any static electricity.

Breadboarding 101:

1. place mobo on a non-conductive surface (like the mobo box)
2. Connect the PSU (don't forget the P4/CPU connector)
3. Install just one stick of RAM (Check your manual for single stick placement)
4. Install just one GPU and connect the monitor
5. Install the CPU and the 212+
6. Jump the PWR_SW pins with a flathead screwdriver, or similar tool

This is the bare minimum setup. If the parts are all functional, you should see the Power On Self Test (POST) resulting with an error message regarding no boot device or no OS found. Ignore this message, and power off the system by jumping the PWR_SW pins again.

Remove the currently installed GPU, then install the other one in place of the first. Repeat step 6 above. If both GPUs showed POST, then add the second stick of RAM to enable dual channel. Repeat step 6.

If both sticks of RAM and both GPUs are functional, then proceed to build in the case, just don't remove the CPU/HSF and RAM.


What do you mean by "case short" you mean damaging my hardware with static electricity? I live in a dorm and my entire dorm is carpet, would it be okay to wear a anti-static wristband be okay standing on carpet? (I also wear a metal watch, would that help?)

Wait, are you suggesting not to install the PSU in the case first? and just plug it in and use the breadboard method that way?

I am very impatient, is the breadboarding method necessary to check if all components are okay?? that way I save time if something doesn't work?

Thanks for the replies
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 1:56:57 AM

A case short is what happens when either the motherboard, or a component plugged into the motherboard, causes an electrical short circuit; not the same as static electricity.

Depending on the environment, the carpet could cause static build-up. The anti-static bands would certainly help, and are recommended.

Sometimes it is actually easier to leave the PSU out of the case when breadboarding, so that the power cables can reach the mobo easier. Breadboarding isn't necessary, but you leave on more possibility on the table if you don't rule out a short.

There are two ways to look at the new build scenario:

1. Gather up all your parts and install them in the case without testing them - you'll either get the system to POST or you won't. If you don't, breadboarding will be suggested as diagnostic procedure; or
2. Breadboard first to ensure your components work before installing them in the case - If you find that parts aren't working before putting them in the case, you won't have to go through the trouble of taking them out.

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June 3, 2011 2:04:32 AM

Oh okay, alright then, so setting the PSU ontop of a wooden table, have mobo ontop of a non-conductible surface, plug in 1 of the RAM, CPU, monitor, 1 of the GPU and then see if it works? Then do the same with different RAM and different GPU?

I can see how breadboarding is good for checking if my components are not broken, but I am afraid I will somehow make a mistake somewhere.

I have already ordered myself a anti-static wristband and branded "touch the chassis to discharge first before touching any hardware" into my brain, however, I cannot avoid carpet, I will be barefooted on carpet no matter where I go here since the kitchen is too small for the HAF X case.

Aside from all that I have a question about installing the CPU, do i need a cotton swab or something to apply the thermal paste? I'm thinking I'll *** my pants while installing the CPU cause that's how scared I am of messing up.

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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2011 5:06:05 PM

Installing the CPU is pretty simple. Be mindful of the instructions, as the CPU can seem like it installs in various orientations, but actually, it can only be installed in one direction. Installing the CPU incorrectly will cause the pins to bend.

You don't need anything to apply the thermal paste. If there isn't already a pre-applied batch of thermal paste on the 212+, just pick up some Artic Silver 5 (if no thermal paste was provided with the 212+). To apply the paste, just put a pea-sized amount on the CPU, then evenly spread it out.
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June 3, 2011 7:37:41 PM

T_T said:
Installing the CPU is pretty simple. Be mindful of the instructions, as the CPU can seem like it installs in various orientations, but actually, it can only be installed in one direction. Installing the CPU incorrectly will cause the pins to bend.

You don't need anything to apply the thermal paste. If there isn't already a pre-applied batch of thermal paste on the 212+, just pick up some Artic Silver 5 (if no thermal paste was provided with the 212+). To apply the paste, just put a pea-sized amount on the CPU, then evenly spread it out.


I have checked an the 212+ comes with thermal paste, hopefully it's good enough?

To apply the paste, and to spread it out evenly, how do I do this? with a cotton swab? cardboard?

Also, I am vary that the i5 2500k is very good for overclocking, and since this CPU cooler is good, how do I Overclock safely with my Asrock extreme4 p67 b3, I've read articles but I just get more confused on how to do it through the BIOS and checking stability and what not.. =[ sorry if I am troublesome.
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a b U Graphics card
a b K Overclocking
June 4, 2011 12:02:20 AM

No trouble - everyone had to start somewhere. Even I have asked for help on this forum. In regards to applying the thermal paste, you shouldn't have to if the 212+ comes with the paste pre-applied, which it typically does. For now, don't worry about how to apply it; cross that bridge when you get to it.

The i5 2500K is a nice CPU indeed. Before you start overclocking, grab a notepad and pen to write down some notes on the observations you'll make during your OC process. The next thing you'll want to do is read through your mobo manual to get an understanding of the standard and advanced features in the BIOS. Be able to identify the areas in the BIOS that will allow you to change the FSB, the CPU multiplier, DRAM: Frequency (speed), Timing (latency), and Voltage. Also learn where to turn off or disable power saving features, such as Speedstep and C1E.

Start your OC by first manually configuring your RAM settings to the specs shown on the stickers on the RAM sticks. Now, because you have the 2500k, your CPU multiplier is "unlocked". This means that you can either increase the base clock (bclk)-but you won't be able to go far- or the multiplier. With your CPU, you probably won't be able to raise the bclk by more than 5; this would put you at 105 MHz on the bclk. Rather, this CPU allows the multiplier to go as high as 57, bringing your OC to as high as around 6.0 GHz, but to OC at 6.0 everyday is kind of nuts.

Here is a link to a guide that will get you to 4.5 GHz, while explaining some of the things you may encounter in your BIOS:

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cpus/2011/01/07/how-to...

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June 4, 2011 1:55:29 AM

okay, I've read something similar too. So I have to increase voltage and cpu multiplier within my motherboard, I'm not looking for a 5+ghz clockspeed, something under 5ghz is fine, since I'm mostly gaming and watching movies.

Also, my motherboard won't ship in till end of june which sucks cause I have all the other parts, does anyone know where I can get the same board for the same price?
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