Read/Write speed vs. port speed

So intel just debuted thunderbolt the other day which to start, has a theoretical bandwidth of 10Gb/s using cable. This is great and all, but im wondering if that is necessary for anything other than streaming video. Say for instance reading/writing data onto a thumb drive.

USB3.0 has a bandwidth of 5Gb/s, however USB3.0 flash drives only can read/write data at 54Mb/s and 15Mb/s, respectively. So i guess my question is, why keep increasing the bandwidth of the connections when the media you are reading from and writing to can only do so at a fraction of the connections bandwidth.
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  1. snurp85 said:
    So intel just debuted thunderbolt the other day which to start, has a theoretical bandwidth of 10Gb/s using cable. This is great and all, but im wondering if that is necessary for anything other than streaming video. Say for instance reading/writing data onto a thumb drive.

    USB3.0 has a bandwidth of 5Gb/s, however USB3.0 flash drives only can read/write data at 54Mb/s and 15Mb/s, respectively. So i guess my question is, why keep increasing the bandwidth of the connections when the media you are reading from and writing to can only do so at a fraction of the connections bandwidth.


    54MBps is the USB2.0 limit... there are USB3.0 flash drives out there breaking the sound barrier at this point (370MBps+), like this one:
    http://thessdreview.com/latest-buzz/super-talent-usb-3-0-raiddrive%E2%84%A2-over-370-mbs/
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